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Old 08-01-2012, 09:34 PM   #11
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I once read on a bottle of white wine that 20 minutes in an ice bucket = 2 hours in the fridge. It seems to be true. The water in the ice bucket carries away the heat much more efficiently than air does.
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Old 08-02-2012, 01:19 AM   #12
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almost any liquid helps heat energy flow much better than air, probably because of molecular proximity. that's why it's quicker to defrost a frozen solid turkey in a sink of water than it is to put it in the fridge or (unsafely) on a counter. technically speaking, air is an insulator.

steve and marge, have other types of woods been tried by coopers for wine barrels?

i'm thinking that like different smoke affects bbq, similar woods would affect wine.

also, marge, do you char the inside of your barrels, do you use sulphur? how would you recommend pre-treating the oak you posted about?
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Old 08-02-2012, 02:36 AM   #13
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almost any liquid helps heat energy flow much better than air, probably because of molecular proximity. that's why it's quicker to defrost a frozen solid turkey in a sink of water than it is to put it in the fridge or (unsafely) on a counter. technically speaking, air is an insulator.
This link may interest you Why wine found in shipwrecks really DOES taste better than the stuff stored in a chateau | Mail Online
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Old 08-02-2012, 03:10 AM   #14
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That's interesting. I wonder if adding a sprinkle of salt to a glass of wine would improve it.
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Old 08-02-2012, 03:21 AM   #15
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That's interesting. I wonder if adding a sprinkle of salt to a glass of wine would improve it.
don't know tax,but a mouthful of salty nuts works well
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:55 AM   #16
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T.U. Bolas: interesting article on ship wrecked wines

Thank you for your interesting contribution.

Have wonderful summer and hope you are up to par,
Margaux Cintrano.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:53 AM   #17
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I read somewhere that some used bourbon barrels are re-purposed for storage and/or aging of various wines and/or other potables, such as port. I often wondered where all them barrels went. Bourbon is required to be aged in new charred white oak barrels.
I wonder how one would find out if that is true and how to acquire a port or other consumable that had been aged in bourbon barrels?
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:27 AM   #18
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steve and marge, have other types of woods been tried by coopers for wine barrels?
Other types of woods have been used, including chestnut and cherry. The problem encountered with other types of woods is that they are too porous, or they contain volatile oils that impart bitterness.

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also, marge, do you char the inside of your barrels, do you use sulphur? how would you recommend pre-treating the oak you posted about?
Oak used for wine barrels is air dried for 24-36 months. When they are assembled, the inside is charred over a fire. There are different levels of "toast": light, medium, and heavy. Charring the barrel reduces the amount of tannins that the wood releases, so the heavier the char, the longer a wine can be aged in it. For this reason, full-bodied wines are usually aged in barrels with a heavier amount of char.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:31 AM   #19
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I read somewhere that some used bourbon barrels are re-purposed for storage and/or aging of various wines and/or other potables, such as port. I often wondered where all them barrels went. Bourbon is required to be aged in new charred white oak barrels.
I wonder how one would find out if that is true and how to acquire a port or other consumable that had been aged in bourbon barrels?
I'm not sure about wine, but sherry and port is sometimes aged in re-purposed barrels that previously held spirits - and vice versa. My wife and I recently visited a distillery in Missouri that ages all of their whiskey in used wine barrels.
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:37 PM   #20
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I'm not sure about wine, but sherry and port is sometimes aged in re-purposed barrels that previously held spirits - and vice versa. My wife and I recently visited a distillery in Missouri that ages all of their whiskey in used wine barrels.
one of my fav whiskey's is penderhyn single malt welsh(of course)whiskey,it's matured in madeira barrels & has that slight sweet edge that makers mark/woodford reserve bourbon has,which as hoot knows,are my fav bourbons,can't find wild turkey anywhere hoot!!
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