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Old 09-03-2016, 04:25 PM   #11
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One more thing: for the past two years I've been doing translation work for various oenologists commissioned in China to supervise mass planting of vineyards and building of wineries on a massive scale, the aim being to overtake the total production of France and Italy put together within the next 5 years. We'll have to wait and watch this space! This information was published in the papers more than 3 years ago, so they should be well on the way by now!

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I don't consider that good news at all. Doesn't China have enough of the world economy?
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Old 09-03-2016, 08:56 PM   #12
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It's very bad news, for more than one reason: competition between the world's various major producers could easily cause a vast drop in prices at the expense of quality, and also a downturn in the standards of production or else affect production techniques as well....or do we take the view that it's time to wake up?

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Old 09-04-2016, 10:03 AM   #13
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I don't consider that good news at all. Doesn't China have enough of the world economy?
Good grief, Addie. Give it a rest. The Chinese probably say the same thing about us.

As for Chinese competition in the global wine market, I say why not? They're probably tired of paying inflated prices for over-valued French Bordeaux. Europe has had a somewhat protectionist stance for far too long. By way of illustration, walk into a wine shop anywhere in Europe and try to find a good quality, artisanal American wine. About the only thing you'll see are Gallo and a few mass produced products that have been able to bully their way in. This is despite the fact that the US is the fourth largest wine producing country in the world. We've been more or less locked out of the EU market for decades now, mostly due to the French influence.
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Old 09-04-2016, 11:15 AM   #14
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I think that's absolutely true Steve. The price of wine seems definitely to be controlled by the founder countries within the EU as well. That means that the cost of very good wines (Hungary, etc) doesn't seem to get much attention even though there are very good wines, and good value ones too. I may be wrong. However, there are high quality wines around that are very good value as well being interesting for people who like to enjoy a good wine with the bonus of a good price. The sales of high prestige wines in Europe is always controlled by the brokers, and the chance of the ordinary guy getting a look in is slim. I'm not surprised that in many places there are wine appreciation societies who get together for tastings, and a good experience like that is educational and informative, and you form friendships as well. I reckon that the value stores do give value for money - you may get a wine that has 'off' aromas and flavours, but you learn to recognise a faulty wine. I always read the reports on the vintage each year - very educational stuff. China will plant its vineyards whatever we think. It'll take China proably a minimum of four to five years before they get a vintage off the new vines. I wonder will we really be swamped with what they produce, and will we be in for a nice surprise, i.e. something really good at a really good price that is accessible to most.

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Old 09-04-2016, 11:48 AM   #15
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China will plant its vineyards whatever we think. It'll take China proably a minimum of four to five years before they get a vintage off the new vines. I wonder will we really be swamped with what they produce, and will we be in for a nice surprise, i.e. something really good at a really good price that is accessible to most.
Are they doing this for domestic sales, i.e., for the growing Chinese middle class, or for sale internationally?
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Old 09-04-2016, 12:54 PM   #16
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Chinese society is becoming more affluent now. In some areas of the world there is climate change. Round here, one very prestigious producer is planting
new vineyards at a higher altitude because of this. In addition globalisation is a major factor in modern society, with vineyards and wineries being set up all over the place. We could take the view 'why there' - why not? I started out with this topic full of doubt, but if you think about it, as they say in China 'We live in interesting times'. I tell you what, though: it'll keep us all on our toes!

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Old 09-04-2016, 05:35 PM   #17
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With the track record of what comes out of China, I'd be a little wary of substances other than crushed grapes in the "wine".
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Old 09-04-2016, 09:50 PM   #18
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Well, yes, but that's also true of other areas where they produce wine. It's one of the reasons why there is 'Appellation Controlče', Denominazione di Origine Controllata, and so forth. Italy was once caught putting methanol in the Barbera, and when the scandal broke, the rivers ran red! But it remains to be seen. I haven't seen any articles yet about Chinese wine, but I think that, if you are interested further, you could read the article 'The globalisation of the wine industry: new world, old world and China, author Michael Thorpe, publication Chinese Agricultural Economic review, Publisher Emerald Group Publication Review Ltd Date 05/15/2009. I haven't read it. I've 'collected' my information on the basis of trade forecasts and what the local wine producers where we live say, and the other people engaged in the wine trade round here say.

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Old 09-04-2016, 11:37 PM   #19
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Situation in China seems analogous to the increase in demand for wine in the US post WW-II and the rise if Australian wines. I kind of think it will be good for wine culture.

The European wine industry has been whining about globalization of wine and wine demand since Phylorrexia. Good wine is good wine, and sounds like there are decent areas in China to grow. If I had capital amounts of money, instead of say hoping my landlord will accept muffins as a bribe to wait until next payday... I'd invest in one.

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Old 09-05-2016, 01:20 PM   #20
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Situation in China seems analogous to the increase in demand for wine in the US post WW-II and the rise if Australian wines. I kind of think it will be good for wine culture.

The European wine industry has been whining about globalization of wine and wine demand since Phylorrexia. Good wine is good wine, and sounds like there are decent areas in China to grow. If I had capital amounts of money, instead of say hoping my landlord will accept muffins as a bribe to wait until next payday... I'd invest in one.

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I dunno. The Chinese don't have a great reputation for ensuring safety and quality of foods and beverages.
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