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Old 08-02-2012, 11:34 AM   #1
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Italian wine bottle designs

I’m not a wine connoisseur, I just love wine, and I like tasting a god bottle once in a while: next in line, Valle dei Laghi Merlot, Castelfederer Müller Thurgau, Mons Feretris Bianchello del Metauro
I made some research for my own education and I decided to share them in this post, to illustrate the different bottles used for Italian wines. Bottles vary in color and thickness, and obviously in shape, but generally not in capacity, since wine in Italy is generally sold in 75 cl glass bottles, corresponding to 6 calici (a type of glass).
And since I like fiddling with Photoshop, I created an image, which shows you the different bottles listed in the following paragraphs (with one exception).



Wine bottle designs
Albeisa – This is an ancient bottle, made with thick and dark glass, which was redesigned in 1973 by Piedmontese winemakers for their more important red wines.
Alsaziana, Renana – Slender bottles, generally used for white or rosé wines. They can be colorless or green.
Anfora – Characteristic bottle, in green glass, designed in 1953 by the Italian architect Antonio Maiocchi for Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi wine.
Bordolese – Named after Bordeaux region in France, it can be colorless for white wines, green for red wines, brown for aged red wines. Bordolese piccola is a smaller bottle, while Bordolese a spalla alta is more stylish and used for some red wines.
Borgognotta, Borgognona – Cylindrical bottle, named after Burgundy French region. It is colorless for white wines, green and brown for red wines.
Champagne cuvèe – This cylindrical bottle, squatter toward the bottom, is mainly used for spumante wines. It is made with dark and thick glass.
Champagnotta, Sciampagnotta – Cylindrical bottle used for spumante wines. The glass is thicker then a standard wine bottle, due to the higher pressure applied by the sparkling content. The color is typically dark green. Champagnotta bottles may have different capacities, each one of them with a specific name (like piccolo, 0.1875 l, or melchisedec, 30 l).
Chiantigiana – Bottle with a 1.5 l capacity, mainly used for the wines from Chianti area (I couldn’t find any image for this bottle).
Fiasco – Ancient rounded bottle with the bottom half covered by a straw basket. Traditionally used for Tuscany wines, once was very diffused but today is rare due to high costs of production.
Marsalese, Marsala – Mainly used for fortified wines like Marsala, it is made with dark brown or black glass.
Porto – Squat cylindrical bottle, usually green or brown, mainly used for fortified wines like Port, Madeira or Sherry. I must admit these are not Italian wines; I need to find out if this bottle is also used for Italian wines, maybe on some future posts.
Pulcianella – Short, pot-bellied bottle original from the Tuscanian town of Montepulciano, mainly used for fine and rare wines.
Torino – Designed in 2008 for the finest Piedmontese wines from the town and province of Torino, it is an asymmetric bottle, green for white wines and brown for red wines.

If you spot any mistake, please tell me! I'm here to learn, friends.

That’s all, alla salute!

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Old 08-02-2012, 12:26 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
I’m not a wine connoisseur, I just love wine, and I like tasting a god bottle once in a while: next in line, Valle dei Laghi Merlot, Castelfederer Müller Thurgau, Mons Feretris Bianchello del Metauro
I made some research for my own education and I decided to share them in this post, to illustrate the different bottles used for Italian wines. Bottles vary in color and thickness, and obviously in shape, but generally not in capacity, since wine in Italy is generally sold in 75 cl glass bottles, corresponding to 6 calici (a type of glass).
And since I like fiddling with Photoshop, I created an image, which shows you the different bottles listed in the following paragraphs (with one exception).



Wine bottle designs
Albeisa – This is an ancient bottle, made with thick and dark glass, which was redesigned in 1973 by Piedmontese winemakers for their more important red wines.
Alsaziana, Renana – Slender bottles, generally used for white or rosé wines. They can be colorless or green.
Anfora – Characteristic bottle, in green glass, designed in 1953 by the Italian architect Antonio Maiocchi for Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi wine.
Bordolese – Named after Bordeaux region in France, it can be colorless for white wines, green for red wines, brown for aged red wines. Bordolese piccola is a smaller bottle, while Bordolese a spalla alta is more stylish and used for some red wines.
Borgognotta, Borgognona – Cylindrical bottle, named after Burgundy French region. It is colorless for white wines, green and brown for red wines.
Champagne cuvèe – This cylindrical bottle, squatter toward the bottom, is mainly used for spumante wines. It is made with dark and thick glass.
Champagnotta, Sciampagnotta – Cylindrical bottle used for spumante wines. The glass is thicker then a standard wine bottle, due to the higher pressure applied by the sparkling content. The color is typically dark green. Champagnotta bottles may have different capacities, each one of them with a specific name (like piccolo, 0.1875 l, or melchisedec, 30 l).
Chiantigiana – Bottle with a 1.5 l capacity, mainly used for the wines from Chianti area (I couldn’t find any image for this bottle).
Fiasco – Ancient rounded bottle with the bottom half covered by a straw basket. Traditionally used for Tuscany wines, once was very diffused but today is rare due to high costs of production.
Marsalese, Marsala – Mainly used for fortified wines like Marsala, it is made with dark brown or black glass.
Porto – Squat cylindrical bottle, usually green or brown, mainly used for fortified wines like Port, Madeira or Sherry. I must admit these are not Italian wines; I need to find out if this bottle is also used for Italian wines, maybe on some future posts.
Pulcianella – Short, pot-bellied bottle original from the Tuscanian town of Montepulciano, mainly used for fine and rare wines.
Torino – Designed in 2008 for the finest Piedmontese wines from the town and province of Torino, it is an asymmetric bottle, green for white wines and brown for red wines.

If you spot any mistake, please tell me! I'm here to learn, friends.

That’s all, alla salute!
interesting luca,the champagne cuvee is the same shape that aspalls cyder uses,the pulcianella is the same shape that mateus rosé comes in & in english fiasco means disaster!!
didn't realise there were so many shapes.guess that's the trouble with supermarkets,everything apart from the bubbly & mateus comes in the same shape bottle.cheers matey,interesting stuff
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:29 PM   #3
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Luca: Fab Post

Thank you for your valuable informative post on Italian Bottling.

The 1st glass bottles ( vessels ) date back to the 2nd century Roman viticulture. The Romans guarded the precious essences in glass recipients.

The Spanish wine bottles are fairly similar, each region having their own take on bottling and of course the Catalonia Province of Barcelona, The Cava Bottle looks alot like the Champagne bottle from France.

Have a fabulous summer.
Kind regards,
Margaux Cintrano
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:38 PM   #4
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interesting luca,the champagne cuvee is the same shape that aspalls cyder uses,the pulcianella is the same shape that mateus rosé comes in & in english fiasco means disaster!!
Same here for fiasco! And I was thinking that there is no bottle similar to that used for the Portuguese Lancer's wine, which was very very popular in Italy when I was younger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Cobean View Post
didn't realise there were so many shapes.guess that's the trouble with supermarkets,everything apart from the bubbly & mateus comes in the same shape bottle.cheers matey,interesting stuff
Me too, the wines I've been drinking all come in the same 2/3 kinds of bottle.

And thank you!
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:40 PM   #5
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...
The 1st glass bottles ( vessels ) date back to the 2nd century Roman viticulture. The Romans guarded the precious essences in glass recipients.
...
I haaate these know-it-all Romans...

Ciao Margi
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:43 PM   #6
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Same here for fiasco! And I was thinking that there is no bottle similar to that used for the Portuguese Lancer's wine, which was very very popular in Italy when I was younger.



Me too, the wines I've been drinking all come in the same 2/3 kinds of bottle.

And thank you!
pleasure luca....don't know about over there but,over here,once you had drunk your chianti out of the fiasco,well,a glass,but then again sometimes straight out of the fiasco!! & you had drunk your mateus you made a lamp out of the fiasco & stuck a candle in the mateus bottle.italian restaurants & the homes of the customers had one on every table!!
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:47 PM   #7
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I haaate these know-it-all Romans...

Ciao Margi
dunno mate,if it hadn't been for julius caesar & the roman invasion we wouldn't have roads or bathrooms over 'ere!!
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:51 PM   #8
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dunno mate,if it hadn't been for julius caesar & the roman invasion we wouldn't have roads or bathrooms over 'ere!!


Same reason why in Rome they cannot build a tube: every time they dig, some ancient Roman remains pop up, and they must stop until some egghead tells them what to do!
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:51 PM   #9
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In my younger days, I been known to be over-served and create a fiasco or two, myself.
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:52 PM   #10
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In my younger days, I been known to be over-served and create a fiasco or two, myself.
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