"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine > The Wine Cellar
View Poll Results: What matters more, terroir or market appeal?
Terroir 14 73.68%
Market Appeal 5 26.32%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-05-2009, 04:46 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,256
I only buy wines that have pictures of cute dogs on the label!
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 04:48 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I only buy wines that have pictures of cute dogs on the label!
That's great, jenny. When Buck and I had doggies, our method of purchasing dog food was choosing the package with the cutest dog on it. Seriously.
__________________

__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 04:51 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I only buy wines that have pictures of cute dogs on the label!
Unfortunately, Jenny, many Americans buy wine just that way. If the label catches their eye with a significant (for them) image, a favorite color or a name that has nothing to do with what is in the bottle, that's what they choose, even often when a salesperson tries to steer them to something they might like the taste of better..

Sadly, many plonky wines are designed that way, for just that reason.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 04:53 PM   #14
Sous Chef
 
Ken's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 725
If I don't drink wine, does that mean the terroir-ists win?
__________________
"Mmmmmm. Floor pie."
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:07 PM   #15
Cook
 
chefnaterock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Somewhere nice
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
Sorry, Nate, but the word is TERROIR and not "terrior." Please get it changed. It is a French word that really has no accurate translation into English. It means "the soil," but not only the soil, but also the microclimate of the place the specific grapes are grown AND the growing conditions of each specific vintage.

There is significant conflict between many French winemakers and their Californian counterparts, that the Americans manipulate the grapes to make the wines taste the same as wines from other places, and as well, taste exactly the same from year to year. Thus, many (and not only French) feel there is little if any "terroir" to many California wines.

For me terroir is very important to why I choose and like a wine. Never "market appeal."
Yup, you are right June, sorry about the misspell, spelling was never my strong suit (my French is admittedly very poor as well). I suppose I should download the spell-check thing.

I am a member of a tasting group (mostly wine makers, growers, and writers) in N.E. Ohio. Terroir is a hotly debated topic among the old world folks in the group and the neauvou wine makers (sp again?). The definition of the word seems to be the biggest area of debate, what does it cover and not cover?

So I asked Laurent Drouhin about it at a Burgundy tasting in Cleveland. He told me terroir is the sun, the rain, the soil, the subsoil, the temperature, the humidity, and the worker in the field. He was very clear in telling me that terroir CANNOT be influenced in the cellar - only taken away from or destroyed - which is the debate amongst my wine friends I was just talking about.

I ask the question based more of market appeal for flavor rather than labeling. The "American" taste for wine tends to be "Big". Big alcohol, big oak, big tannins, big mouthfeel, big finish. So the Cali. winemakers are giving people what they want. I don't think it's a problem, only a preference. I love the challenge of tasting a wine, without knowing what it is, and trying to figure out where it came from, what year it was made, what type of oak it was cast in. Elegant, bold, fruity, sweet, light, heavy, steel, oak, I just like the challenge. There is no right or wrong answer to the poll, I am just curious what others think.
__________________
Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work. - Aristotle
chefnaterock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:12 PM   #16
Cook
 
chefnaterock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Somewhere nice
Posts: 75
Sorry June, I changed the spelling where I could, but can't figure out how to edit the poll. Maybe an admin or moderator can help?
__________________
Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work. - Aristotle
chefnaterock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:13 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
It's an interesting topic. European children are raised on wine (watered down, to be sure, but wine, nonetheless) and American children are raised on milk and soda... both SWEET -- LOTS of sugar, and not the residual kind found in wine. As a result, many adults in America have the taste for sweet beverages, and most wine does not fall into that category.

Add to that, most folks want to slug their wine the way they would a coke or a beer, and when they do that, even the finest wine will taste NASTY!

Did you know some Aussie wines are made to be especially sweet to appeal to Americans' tastes? They make them different for themselves. Interesting, Godiva chocolate also has two different formulas -- one for Europeans, the other (sweeter) for Americans.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:27 PM   #18
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,349
Could someone please explain to me how wineries manipulate the grapes to make their wine taste different? Also, why is that a bad thing?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:31 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Glorie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 380
I guess wines could pick up a different flavor depending on where they grew, soil content etc.
I tend to buy local wines made here in Washington or California - they have a good flavor and a reasonable price. Sometimes I'll "go out on a limb" and get Australian, lol
__________________
Glorie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 05:32 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Could someone please explain to me how wineries manipulate the grapes to make their wine taste different? Also, why is that a bad thing?
Andy, there are myriad techniques used by winemakers to manipulate the grapes, and more than that, the wine itself. I am not an expert in that at all, but I do know some add oak chips, some add unfermented grape juice, some add sugar, itself. but it is not all about adding things to the wine. The trend these days is to let the grapes get overripe before picking. That will always result in a sweeter wine. I'm not good at this, and I don't want what I say to be taken as gospel...

and it is not necessarily a bad thing. especially if you like the results. It does, however, rob the wine of its sense of place, its terroir.
__________________

__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
terroir

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.