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Old 05-02-2012, 05:38 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I once saw how to taste wine on a PBS cooking show. We went to an upscale pizzeria and had the house wine. It had tasted perfectly drinkable on the first few sips, then we "tasted it". Suddenly we could taste all sorts of unpleasant off flavours. We don't do that with house wines any more.
"House wines" tend to put me off. I usually see them coming out of a tap along with soft drinks, or worse, there's a large bottle sitting open next to the hot refrigerator motor.

I do drink them sometimes, though. One of our local Italian eateries has pretty decent house wines. But every so often you get one that's been open a while and tastes a little "tired". I just tell the server. Nine times out of ten they'll open a fresh bottle.
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:02 PM   #32
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I had good luck in Italy drinking caraffe di vino della casa.
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:02 PM   #33
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Okay, I haven't been a fan of imbibing on a regular basis for a long time. However, I have had some good Australian Shiraz and Merlot. (Yellowtail)

For our Anniversary and New Year's we had Santos Moscato d'Asti that we got at Costco. We really liked it.

I'm happy with sweeter wines, like Mogen David and some Sangrias.

Truthfully, I am such a lightweight, that one glass of wine is all I can handle without falling over. I very rarely drink, the bottle of Moscato d'Asti is still half full and in the bottom of the fridge.

If you ask me to describe a wine, all I can say is if I like it or not.
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Old 05-02-2012, 11:38 PM   #34
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Mmm. Prosecco, my fave. Pinot Grigio. A nice Chablis. A rich Merlot. Cabs, Savignons, sherry, too many to mention, they're all good!
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Old 05-03-2012, 04:58 AM   #35
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@ Harry, Gravy Train & Vinos Tintos de Argentina

Good Morning,

@ Harry:

Firstly, the Jeréz de La Frontera wines that you have mentioned are Not Finos. These are Amontillados, which in fact, are fermented by the Solera System and thus, are actually more Brandies. ( ah mon ti ya dos )
Lustaú is one of the oldest producers of this amber aged grape based product. Gonzalez y Byass, Tío Pepe amongst others, all have their Bodegas ( wine cellars ) in the city centre, of Jeréz de La Frontera, which is an absolutely lovely place to spend a few days and learn about wine, horses ( The Equestrian School ) and Flamenco ...

@ Gravy Queen:

We have had this Prosecco conversation a few times ! It is my fave sparkling white ... Speaking of Red Velvet Malbec 100% Grape Mono Varietal Argentinian Wines, here are a few dynamic ones:

RED VELVETY HEAVENLY ARGENTINIAN WINE RECOMMENDATIONS:

1) Argento Malbec - Sainsbury Cellars: cacoa and spice finish

2) Terrazas de Los Andes Malbec Reserva: rich cherry, cacao and smoke notes

3) Concha y Toro: earthy and savoury however, a more commercial product

4) Finca Flichman Mistería: with a kiss of vanilla spice, gorgeous

5) Lurton Bodegas: Lurton Piedra Negra Malbec 100% is a stunnign black fruit velvety wine with a leatherish finish and a hint of refreshing mint and is wonderful. I have had many wines by this worldwide producer, including their RUEDA, Castilla León WHITE from the Verdejo 100% Grape and it was truly lovely, and perhaps, the best Rueda I have had !

Have a lovely day.

Margi Cintrano.
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:37 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Good Morning,

@ Harry:

Firstly, the Jeréz de La Frontera wines that you have mentioned are Not Finos. These are Amontillados, which in fact, are fermented by the Solera System and thus, are actually more Brandies. ( ah mon ti ya dos )
Lustaú is one of the oldest producers of this amber aged grape based product. Gonzalez y Byass, Tío Pepe amongst others, all have their Bodegas ( wine cellars ) in the city centre, of Jeréz de La Frontera, which is an absolutely lovely place to spend a few days and learn about wine, horses ( The Equestrian School ) and Flamenco ...


Have a lovely day.

Margi Cintrano.
fascinating but confusing margi,i thought fino was a pale dry sherry,but not as dry as a manzanilla(my fav) & thought the amontillados were medium/sweet(not a lover of sweet drinks).
guess i need to get myself off to jerez & do some studying,god it'll be hard work but someones gotta do it................!
harry
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:24 PM   #37
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@ Harry: Uncomplicating the 3 Jeréz Wine Types

Good Evening.

Firstly, let us begin with the following names and their English definitions:

1) SHERRY = FINO = a brut dry blonde Sherry ( IS ONLY PRODUCED IN JERÉZ DE LA FRONTERA in very dry and sunny vineyards, thus, the crispness. Always served WELL CHILLED and ice cold. PALE DRY, it is often called by the English who frequent this Region on holidays. The wineries employ American Oak in the ageing process.

2) AMONTILLADO VIEJO ( aged ) = Amber colored DRY wine made from grapes, and aged in a unique Solera System method. This wine is similar to a Brandy. They possess a nutty aroma and post gusto.

3) OLOROSO = the is a burnt sienna colored SWEET OR SEMI SWEET thick well rounded Jeréz brandy also made from grapes, and is aged in the Solera System. These are quite full bodied dessert wines. Great for those who wish to use with a dessert. It is common, in the Molecular end of Gastronomy to employ Oloroso with Foie Gras.

4) MANZANILLA = which is a LIGHT DRY ACIDIC SHERRY from Sanlucar de Barremeda and El Puerto de Santa Maria, Chiclana: the beach of the Dioses = Gods; AND the acid is due to the seashore so close to the bodegas = wineries. FINO ( my viewpoint ) is a much lovelier product.

5) SHERIS SACK = the name the Moorish gave this white wine AND sacar, the Spanish verb; means to go to the exterior or to take out or to remove.


STEP TWO: THE GRAPES GROWN IN THIS DESIGNATION OF ORIGIN = DENOMINACIÓN ORIGEN

The main white grape grown for winery Sherry or its related products numbered 1 to 4:

PALOMILLO = the predominate white grape ( blonde Fino Dry Sherry is made of this grape 100% ).

I hope this MINI MINI WINE TASTER´s LESSON has uncomplicated your state of confusion.

Have nice evening.
Margi.
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:28 PM   #38
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Mmm. Prosecco, my fave. Pinot Grigio. A nice Chablis. A rich Merlot. Cabs, Savignons, sherry, too many to mention, they're all good!
Someone after my own heart - those are my favorites as well. Although I do use dry sherry more for cooking than imbibing. But different brands of Prosecco (my husband LOVES experimenting), Pinot Grigio, & Chablis - along with various reds - are always in residence here.
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:46 PM   #39
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buenas noches margi
(please don't reply in spanish,those are the only two words i know!)
fantastic masterclass made all the more interesting by sipping an ice cold glass of hidalgo la gitana manza whilst reading...you really can taste the salt can't you?!
have a delicious evening margi
harry
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:05 PM   #40
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Dawgluver,

Thanks for feedback ... As always, it is nice to see you on my posts. Have a nice wkend.

What brands of Prosecco do you sip ?

Margi.
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