"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beverages and Wine > The Wine Cellar
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-02-2010, 11:26 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Part of 'the deal' with wine is the MADD mentality in this country (21 to drink 18 to vote). Wine is a somewhat acquired taste and at 21 years of age an American is 15 or 18 years behind the 8-ball.
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 11:37 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Part of 'the deal' with wine is the MADD mentality in this country (21 to drink 18 to vote). Wine is a somewhat acquired taste and at 21 years of age an American is 15 or 18 years behind the 8-ball.
This is taking the OP's intention to a different level. I KNOW we're not going to hijack the thread and we all know we won't turn this into a political discussion Let's keep this true to the basic question...thanks!
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:00 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,089
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
First, vintage does not go hand-in-hand with expensive. Most wines are vintage, with a few exceptions. It sounds like you simply haven't developed your palate yet...nothing wrong with that. Stick to either things like a Riesling or go to a wine shop where you can get some help. Tell them that you want a VERY fruit forward wine in maybe a pinot grigio or a chardonnay to start. Make sure the wine did NOT go through an oak fermentation process. You may like a Moscato d'Asti...it's an effervescent white wine from Italy with the sweetness that I think you like. Your palate will change over time...don't rush it. For starters try a more fruit forward red wine and add some tonic water. It will sweeten the wine and dilute the taste...spritzers may be a good way for you to ease into wine. You can do the same thing using a white wine. You can add an orange slice or a lemon/lime slice too. Good luck and let us know if any of the suggestions appeal to you or it's a total miss. We can go from there. Cheers!
These are some great ideas, I will surely give some of them a try! My sister brought a Moscato wine at christmas (not of the sparkling variety) and it was quite easy to drink.
__________________
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:08 PM   #14
Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
First, vintage does not go hand-in-hand with expensive.
We were at a store once and a wine demonstrator told us basically the same thing. When you find a wine you like, look at the label for the flavors of the wine and try to find similar in other ones. Price does not necessarily mean good. We go with what tastes good to us not by price.

Quote:
Make sure the wine did NOT go through an oak fermentation process.
Why is that with the 'oak fermentation'? Curious.

I have started to keep an excel spread sheet with the name of the wine, manufacturer, country/state, red/white/rose,etc., price, where bought, and a rating. We like to try different wines.

My SIL & BIL go to Wine Styles. They have a club you can join and go to their wine tastings. Might be good to try out to see what kind of wines you like.

Carol
__________________
sadievan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:11 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
FWIW, neither White Zinfandel nor White Merlot are Rosé wines. Both fall under the classification of "Blush" wines, as they are sweet, and Rosé wines are NOT sweet, although many have a lot of forward fruit.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:36 PM   #16
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 808
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
FWIW, neither White Zinfandel nor White Merlot are Rosé wines. Both fall under the classification of "Blush" wines, as they are sweet, and Rosé wines are NOT sweet, although many have a lot of forward fruit.
Per whose classification?
__________________
Ravings of an Amateur Foodie
jet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:40 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Hi sadievan,

I say to avoid Oak fermented wines because I think it takes a more experienced palate to appreciate/like them. She is looking for more fruit-forward wines. Also, the Oak fermented wines are more appreciated with certain foods.

Also, about the vintage. It is a fact (unfortunate sometimes) that a wine will be GREAT one vintage and not so great the next. The weather plays a huge factor. So...if you really like a wine see if you can google the production. If it's a low production you may want to stock up. See if your retailer provides a discount on a case purchase.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:52 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post
Per whose classification?
The terms are getting interchanged, but, a rosé is made from red-skinned grapes, which make red wine. The wine is bled off before it reaches the red color. A blush wine is historically made from white-skinned grapes with red wine added to it. If someone says "blush" wine I immediately think of residual sugar being added...if someone mentions roséI think of fruit-forward but bone dry.

That's the short of it, anyway. Per whose classification? The wine-making world.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 12:58 PM   #19
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 808
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf View Post
The terms are getting interchanged, but, a rosé is made from red-skinned grapes, which make red wine. The wine is bled off before it reaches the red color. A blush wine is historically made from white-skinned grapes with red wine added to it. If someone says "blush" wine I immediately think of residual sugar being added...if someone mentions roséI think of fruit-forward but bone dry.

That's the short of it, anyway. Per whose classification? The wine-making world.
I have two books in front of me, The Art and Science of Wine by Halliday and Johnson, and Wine for Dummies that disagree with the distinction between rosé and blush.
__________________
Ravings of an Amateur Foodie
jet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2010, 01:04 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Like I said, they are getting interchanged more frequently now.
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.