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Old 01-16-2010, 10:48 PM   #41
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why bother?

How much enjoyment are you hopeing to acheive by forcing yourself to drink something you dont like.It may just be that you dont like wine.I dont like wine either.
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Old 01-17-2010, 01:11 AM   #42
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coookies, I don't know where you live in MA but if you are near a Yankee Spirits store I suggest you pay them a visit. My nearby one has at least one person available to help you through wine selections. I've worked my way through some of the best of them (and some of the worst ) and am into full-blown dry reds now.

A "fun" wine that is mild on the tongue is a Prosecco (white); I've enjoyed a number of bottles by Mionetto - have not tried any other brand. It's a bit effervescent...like a little party in the mouth!

As "powerplant" stated, tannins will make the wine seem more astringent in your mouth. Think of it as swabbing your tongue with a cotton ball full of rubbing alcohol. Ick!

Half the fun of trying to find a wine/wines you like is the trying. The other half.....heck, I forgot! Busy sampling as I type.
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Old 01-17-2010, 02:13 AM   #43
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Start off with a sweet sparkling wine like Martini & Rossi Asti Spumante. It's sweet, bubbly, and has lot's of stone-fruit aromas that the alcohol and carbonation wisp about your senses. This is my favorite wine to introduce "non-wine drinkers" to. Very consistent in effect.

As someone else mentioned, try some German Rieslings next (which tend to be sweeter than American Rieslings).

Then slowly begin experimenting with other, more dry whites such as an excellent Californian Chardonnay that has been aged in oak to produce those rich buttery flavors. Drier wines benefit from richer fattier food pairings - such as cheese or butter sauces.

Despite what certain popular movies will tell you, I recommend Merlot as a first red. Quality varies considerably, so pick a few and have your own tasting. Most reds are dry, so again, pair accordingly.

Have fun!
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Old 01-19-2010, 05:44 PM   #44
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I tried a Pinot Noir called Cavit last weekend and really liked it, poured through an aerator and it was quite tasty and mild. Also recently tried some sweet white wines out at dinner and liking this trying stuff out business. :) Other than that one Pinot though I will stick to sweet whites for a little while.

:-D
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:48 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by coookies View Post
I tried a Pinot Noir called Cavit last weekend and really liked it, poured through an aerator and it was quite tasty and mild. Also recently tried some sweet white wines out at dinner and liking this trying stuff out business. :) Other than that one Pinot though I will stick to sweet whites for a little while. :-D
We tried the Cavit Pinot Noir and really liked it a lot too. Another red wine we recently tried and liked was called Menage a Trois bottled by Folie a Deux winery. It is a blend of 3 wines, Zinfandel, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Carol
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Old 01-20-2010, 02:09 PM   #46
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....can anyone give me a primer on good wines for a youngin' that hasn't developed a "palette" for it yet?
Try it all. Start sweet if you find it easier to drink. Chablis Blanc's are good...on the sweeter side I've found. Some Sauvignon Blancs are also...Bella Serra has a real nice Pinot Grigio...mild and affordable... I recently bought a Red Rose which was great. Kinda like fruit punch. ;) I have a Zinfindel at home now that is quite yummy... I think it's like beer, you just have to taste them.

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And where does one go from there (i.e., how do you tell a good wine from a bad one if you feel like being adventurous/expensive and trying a vintage wine?)
It helps to know people who know their wine. I'd never have discovered Moscato d'Asti if it weren't for my Aunt...

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Also - strange - recently at a liquor store that had a wine tasting one Friday night, I tried this pinot noir called "Hangtime"... in the store it was wonderful, much lighter than any other pinot I've tried, so I bought a bottle. Tried a glass at home and it was just horrible, couldn't even stomach getting a couple of sips down. Anybody know what gives?
Charles Shaw (aka Two Buck Chuck) sometimes has a really nice Pinot Grigio. Sometimes. Not all batches/bottles/shipments are going to taste the same.
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Old 01-20-2010, 02:12 PM   #47
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I don't like dry wines or a strong wine. I had a glass a wine at a friend house that was really good. It comes in a 5 liter box with a pour spout - It is Peter Vella's White Zinfandel. The color is actually a dark pink even tho it says white. I have used it cooking to with good results.
Yes. Beginners should stay away from Chardonnay. IMO.

Zin-Spritzers are deelish. 1 part 7UP 2 parts Zinfindel...thawed frozen strawberry with syrup stirred in. DEELISH.
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Old 01-20-2010, 03:26 PM   #48
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I like the dry reds and I never spend more than 6 or 7 bucks for a bottle. Trader Joe's is one of my favorite places to buy wine. Their parking sucks though....but that's for another thread.
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Old 01-20-2010, 03:42 PM   #49
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I like the dry reds and I never spend more than 6 or 7 bucks for a bottle. Trader Joe's is one of my favorite places to buy wine. Their parking sucks though....but that's for another thread.
Oh are you shopping at the one in Silverlake??? That one is horrifying....park at Gelsons and cross the street, is what I used to do. ;)

Dry red? Do tell.
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Old 01-20-2010, 05:52 PM   #50
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Oh are you shopping at the one in Silverlake??? That one is horrifying....park at Gelsons and cross the street, is what I used to do. ;)

Dry red? Do tell.
Yep, that one. Because of parking I only go there just a few minutes before they close...around 9pm, usually on my way home from work.

I like Syrah and Pinot Noir. Also, I can never tell the difference between a $10 bottle from a $100 bottle of wine so I settle for a $7 bottle for the most part. :D
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