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Old 06-17-2014, 09:42 AM   #21
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Yep turning the water on full blast to wash your bird can spread germs.

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Old 06-17-2014, 09:45 AM   #22
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I just take mine to the car wash...
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Old 06-17-2014, 09:58 AM   #23
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Yep turning the water on full blast to wash your bird can spread germs.

...and make sure you have the rest of the meal uncovered right next to the sink when you blast on the water.
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:16 AM   #24
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And, not uncommonly, there are the greens and other salad makings that will be eaten raw (and may already have been washed themselves). From a bacteriological view, the meat isn't important, as it will be cooked and the bacteria destroyed. But the greens will go into the salad with their newly acquired bacterial load. (Not to mention the dish drainer rack that's probably sitting right there getting contaminated.)

Washing chicken is a powerful habit, but it accomplished nothing in terms of food safety. It may, however, wash away bits of guts and such that you'd rather not see go into your meal, even if they are in no way harmful. I no longer wash chicken, simply because it mandates a more vigorous cleaning regimen for that end of the kitchen.

Besides, you know most people's idea of "washing" chicken is to rinse it under running water. But that's like pretending that rinsing your hands under running cold water is plenty fine following a trip to the toilet. If you're worried about anything on the chicken, it's fecal bacteria that was floating around the packing facility, so if you feel obliged to wash hands with soap and water after the toilet, why do you think rinsing chicken is enough? Even with soap, hand washing has to be far more vigorous than it usually is to do a decent job of removing bacteria. Hands are as bad as chicken. They both have millions of tiny places for bugs to hide and stick.

So, wash your chicken with soap and water? I won't. I'll wash my hands properly, because I'll be handling the salad. And I may well wash out a chicken cavity. But I'm always mindful that all operations to wash away bacteria also spread bacteria.

Probably as well that, even in our overly sanitized world, we have robust immune systems and rarely get into difficulty, despite ingestion of lots of potentially harmful bacteria daily. Just lay off the antibacterial products. don't be Mom the Bioterrorist.
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Old 06-17-2014, 10:22 AM   #25
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Oh, and the animation is just that, someone's notion, and in no way a reality image, although probably not too far off, other than the fact that the droplets are likely smaller than shown. I could, I suppose, test the theory by dosing a carcass with the appropriate substance, rinsing it under fast running water and checking the area with a forensic light, of which I have several. Actually, I'm not sure I want to know. Like scanning your motel room bed area for body fluids. Not for the squeamish.
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:13 PM   #26
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I do use a plastic cutting board for cutting up chicken and everything else. I got rid of my wooden ones quite a while ago.
Wooden cutting boards are actually safer than plastic: http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/fa...ttingboard.htm

And check this out: Cutting board - wood, acrylic or something else?
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:25 PM   #27
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Wooden cutting boards are actually safer than plastic: UC-Davis Food Safety Laboratory: Cutting Board Research

And check this out: Cutting board - wood, acrylic or something else?

Yes, but.

Then plastic boards go into the DW which sanitizes them by subjecting them to high temperature water.
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:42 PM   #28
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Yes, but.

Then plastic boards go into the DW which sanitizes them by subjecting them to high temperature water.
Maybe. Scarring on the plastic surface from knife cuts can harbor bacteria and I believe it's possible they may survive the dishwasher. You may reach a different conclusion
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Old 06-17-2014, 12:44 PM   #29
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Maybe. Scarring on the plastic surface from knife cuts can harbor bacteria and I believe it's possible they may survive the dishwasher. You may reach a different conclusion

I believe it's possible the sanitization process in the DW works just fine.
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Old 06-17-2014, 01:04 PM   #30
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I'm no a chicken or meat washer. I wash my cutting boards, but am not afraid to cut veggies on the same board that I cut the raw meat on, if the veggies are going to be cooked, especially with the meat. The veggies get at least as hot as the meat does, when the meat is considered safe, and usually much hotter.

I don't believe I've had a case of food poisoning in my life, and I even ate mostly raw bacon once, as a young teen on a camp out. I don't recommend it of course.

When processing veggies to be eaten raw, or lightly cooked, I wash them thoroughly, and process on a freshly washed cutting board. I don't bleach the boards but do wash in very hot, soapy water. The plastic ones also go into the dishwasher.

I am one of those who believe that if we live in a germ-free world, we never give ourselves the ability to develop a healthy, and strong immune system. I don't get infections, except one time. I've been playing in the natural world of dirt and germs all of my life. The only sicknesses I've gotten from micro-critters are colds, and flue's, oh, and chicken pox when I was a kid.

Eat healthy food, get lots of energetic exercise, sleep 7 to 8 hours a night, and keep stress low. These practices will keep you healthier than fretting over food-borne microbes excessively. Of course, use intelligence when handling food. But don't stress about it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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