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Old 03-11-2012, 07:29 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
You're probably right. Next time I visit a fast food joint I'm going to request an extra-large water and see what they do.
Most fast food places sell bottled water now, not from the dispenser. I know McD, BK, & Wendy's do.

I always order water or iced tea when we go out for lunch at a non-fast food place and tea at fast food places.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:11 AM   #32
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Most fast food places sell bottled water now, not from the dispenser. I know McD, BK, & Wendy's do.

I always order water or iced tea when we go out for lunch at a non-fast food place and tea at fast food places.
Me too, I only order soda once in a great while. When Mark and I go to BK (sorry people, I love the Whopper and have to pig-out now and then ), I always get iced tea. They have the best iced tea. Sometimes, I'll just go there for the iced tea.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:21 AM   #33
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Here's what the people who study the phenomenon say. Restaurants have very few business factors they can control. They cannot control rents, utilities, or the unit cost of food. Not can they really control salaries which become fairly standardized. Nor can they control the number of customers who come to eat.

What they can control is how much food they serve and charge for. In any sales business, the more you sell, the more money you make. You can't just charge more for the same food. You have to provide more food in a meal, if you want to charge more for the meal and make more profit. You cannot do it with two-for-one deals. People will not buy two hamburgers, just to get the second one at a lower price. But they will pay more for a bigger burger, if it's available and seems like a good deal. To do this, a restaurant must increase the plate size, too. That plate size becomes the standard. You want customer to want a full plate. Once all this begins, all the competing restaurants must follow, else they appear to be offering inferior value. And the restaurant plate becomes the home standard, also. If you happen to buy a 1940's home that has not been updated, you may well find that the kitchen cabinets will not accommodate a modern dinner plate.

Buffets, when they could be found, were once limited to plain "American" food. Now, the majority are Chinese. And such things as "endless pasta bowls" are featured at Italian chains. Chinese, Italian, and Mexican food are among the cheapest to produce and among the most profitable in very large portions.

Some notable examples. In 1972, the McDonald's "Quarter-Pounder" was considered a large hamburger. It was large. It's original 1955 burger was a "one point two ouncer."



A "large" pizza was once 10 or 12 inches. Pizza is still cut into the same eight slices. But a little geometry will reveal the way in which area increases as diameter increases, and the 1/8 pizza slice gets about 2/3 bigger. In my youth, Coke came in 8 ounce bottles or was served at a fountain in a glass that might barely hold 8 ounces. The standard dinner plate was ten inches. It is not 12 inches. A 10-inch plate has an area of 78.5 square inches. A 12-inch plate is 113 sq. in. And remember how you have to allow for the original coffee "cup" when you buy a coffee maker. People do fill the plate and the cup, and they tend to eat and drink it all.

Now, let's all go out for a Cheesecake Factory Ranch House Burger



Opps. Looks like that 1,900 calorie wonder was listed too many times on the worst hamburger lists. We'll just have to go on over to Chili's for the Chili's Southern Smokehouse Bacon Burger, only 2,290 calories with fries.

Addie is going to cringe (joking), but I have even made burgers like that. I'll have to go find a picture of a monster burger I made once.

As far as restaurant portions, it doesn't really bother me. Like someone said, if you can't eat it, take the rest home to have it for lunch the next day, etc. The only time I have not asked for a doggy bag/container is when Mark and I have been on the motorcycle.

I like all kinds of things. Sometimes I'm in the mood for big portions, sometimes I'm not. I will agree, though, that this country loves it's food... all cuisines!
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:27 AM   #34
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vb's blt has my stomach growling loudly....
thanks, one of my favorite sandwiches!... big or small
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:36 AM   #35
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Counting cups is old school and very inefficient.

Most fast food joints have computerized cash registers. The order taker presses a button labeled BIG MAC, FRIES, COKE and another for size and another for quantity of item and it's recorded in the sales category. An instant after the order is taken, they know at corporate what and how much was sold.
That tells them how many they received payment for. Counting stock and comparing it to what was supplied to the store is the only way to detect theft and sloppy destruction of supplies. It doesn't sound like a big deal, because you would think it would be hard to steal and destroy much in a fast food joint. But a sloppy cook and manager too inept to manage preparation and staff giving food away and taking it home happens enough that the total in a chain of stores is a lot of money. It is a huge problem at WalMart, and I made a fair number of criminal cases on their young checkers letting friends' purchases past the scanner or scanning a lesser price. They tended to be very large thefts, because they grew a large circle of "friends" who went through their line daily. They have good internal security. But not as good as Target. They have the best I'd ever seen and appeared to spend the most on good security and top technology.

A lifetime ago, I made pizzas. Corporate insisted that all failed and rejected pizzas be wrapped and returned to corporate to be credited. Computer analysis would invariably spot a heavy handed cook who used too much topping or a stingy one who was making an inferior product.

And another poster talked about a manager taking home extra toys that turned up in Happy Meals. In most corporation stores, that would get you fired instantly, if discovered. To corporate, minor theft is reason to suspect major theft. Another lifetime ago, I managed for Southland, the 7-Eleven operator. One store manager was increasing his store's profits (to lessen the impact of shoplifting) by going to the 5&10 store and buying small toys that he marked up three times and sold by the register. Instant termination, because money that's off the books is too easy to steal.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:52 AM   #36
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I'll have to go find a picture of a monster burger I made once.
There was no bacon on it though.


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Old 03-11-2012, 10:48 AM   #37
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vb--your bacon and msm's tomatoes--just image, blts beyond your wildest fantasies!
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