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Old 02-05-2012, 04:27 PM   #391
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My great Grandmother's cookbooks and recipe cards "disappeared." I'm not sure who got them and three of the possible suspects are now gone, too. I wish I had them, they were completely scribbled in.

Even in college, I didn't use highlighters in my books, but I did re-write all pertinent ideas and learning into spiral notebooks. Odd obsession, I agree, but it is my obsession and it doesn't matter to me if others write in their books. When I sold my textbooks back, I often got comments on if I had even opened them during the semester and I always got top dollar for them at buyback.

Best of all, the pertinent information from all of those books is still in my possession, my brain and spiral notebooks if and when I need it.
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Old 02-12-2012, 08:26 PM   #392
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I was just looking at this Cooking Shows on TV forum section and thinking about TV chefs I've admired...

I am amazed and awed by Bobby Flay. His recipes look so good and to me at least they look very complicated. I'm a pretty experienced cook and I'm intimidated by his recipes. I have his cookbook Bobby Flay's Mesa Grill Cookbook and all the recipes are "such and so" (main recipe) WITH "something" where the something is always some sort of complex salsa or chutney or relish. The last part alone is usually more complicated than most of the main recipes I generally cook. And worse, his recipes often include very specific sometimes difficult to get ingredients and I don't want to substitute or leave them out. One day I'm going to cook one or several of his recipes (well... not on the same day!) and then I'll know how good his recipe designs are, at least within my cooking abilities (and I usually give a pretty good rendition of most recipes I follow).

So I name Bobby Flay! The OP asked which TV chef is actually the best "ISOLATING COOKING ABILITIES ONLY." Bobby Flay is the best IMO, the best living TV chef.

Haha, you caught the last part. The best departed TV chef is Julia Child! I've cooked dozens of her recipes, have several of her cookbooks, and her style has influenced me for years and will continue to influence me for the rest of my life.

Flay is the best TV chef who I expect to explore in the future. Child is the best TV chef who has influenced me from the past. Nobody expected any agreement in this topic, right? The question in the OP is impossible to answer except by expressing opinions.

So I'm curious what other forum members think about Bobby Flay, his ability, his creativity and his recipes. As I said I haven't tested his recipes but when I do I expect to be thrilled.
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Old 02-12-2012, 08:53 PM   #393
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Understand the Flay love but isn't his cuisine all southwestern? Isn't kinda limiting your choices? I'm tempted to buy his book but I'm not a big fan of spicy food (it steals away from the other flavors). Can you share any recipe that doesn't involve spicy( peppers , cumin, curry n such)?
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:28 PM   #394
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I always wonder if Flay could cook without chilies. Even when he does those Throwdown shows he seems to want to add chilies to everything. I actually can't think of a single thing that I have learned from him although I have learned a lot from many of the other TV personality chefs/cooks. But then he is also very into grilling (or so it appears) and for some reason I am not much interested in that.
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Old 02-12-2012, 09:53 PM   #395
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DCG I think you're mistaken about Flay's recipes all being spicy. I presume you mean hot or very strong taste. There may be many of his recipes that are but I'm pretty sure there many that have much milder taste. I can't quote any of his recipes because (1) they are copyrighted, and (2) my Flay cookbook is in storage at present time and I don't even have access within reason.

Yes his recipes are all either Southwestern, or at least in the cookbook I've mentioned. Myself, I probably cook at least as much Asian food as Southwestern food. Both can be hot, both can be spicy, both can be mild. You can cook all kinds of food.

I don't see how Flay can be limiting. Each night you have to cook (or at least eat) something from some kind of cuisine. If you pick Southwestern then you are limiting yourself, just the same as if you pick French, Scandinavian, Basque, Brazilian or New England. That doesn't mean you can't have some different cuisine the next night.

The best reason I can't share any of Flay's recipes is because I've been too intimidated to try them. They're complicated, they require ingredients that demand advance preparation.

I can't share his recipes because they are his, not mine. Buy the cookbook. Even better, get it from your local public library and try some of them before buying. You can find it in the library at 641.5978 F592.

As I researched the above I discovered that Flay has a large array of cookbooks, focusing on grilling, hamburgers, and American regional recipes. Including what I think is his TV show "Throwdown" on Food Network.

And finally, Google "Bobby Flay recipes." I can't quote his recipes but you can surely read them from his own pen.

Here's a few:

Grilled Chicken Pailard WITH Lemon and Black Pepper and Arugula-Tomato Salad

Chinese Chicken Salad WITH Red Chile Peanut Dressing

Shredded Chicken and Tomatillo Tacos WITH Queso Fresco

Grilled Chicken Wings WITH Spicy Chipotle Hot Sauce and Blue Cheese

Grilled Jerk Chicken WITH Mango Cilantro Salsa

Tandoori Spiced Chicken Breast WITH Grilled Tomato Jam and Herbed Yogurt Sauce


I'll admit I quoted all the above links to support my point that his are always WITH. I suspect that most if not all of the links above are spicy. Maybe a few of them aren't. I went solely by the titles. I bet at least 3/4 of the links I picked at random are delicious!

I am not even going to argue the point that Bobby Flay's recipes are spicy, or too spicy. Everybody must decide for themselves.


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Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
But then he is also very into grilling (or so it appears) and for some reason I am not much interested in that.
I don't know what anybody could say to that. If you don't like grilling, then don't. If you aren't into grilling, or like DCG you aren't into Southwestern, or aren't into spicy food, then you will probably not like Bobby Flay recipes. Particularly if you don't like hamburgers. And evidently you don't and won't.

Nothing wrong with that. It takes all kinds to float the boat!
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Old 02-13-2012, 12:13 AM   #396
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Did you folks know that during 911 Bobby and his restaurants fed the firefighters, cops and other rescue workers around the clock free of charge? My son the P.A. went there with three of his buddies for one week. He said the smell was almost overcoming. It clung to their clothes and yet Bobby's staff never said a word when one would come in to eat.
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Old 02-13-2012, 12:18 AM   #397
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I say Robert Irvine or Anne Burrell. :)
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Old 02-13-2012, 06:24 AM   #398
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European Celebrity Chefs

Good Morning,

Since I reside between Madrid Capital on the Iberian Peninsula and Italia´s Adriatic, I shall mention only European Celebrity Chefs, as I only make an annual trip over the Blue Pond.

In Spain:

With Michelin:

Carme Ruscadella
Ferrán and Albert Ariá
Joan Roca
Pedro Subijana
Juan Mari Arzak
Paco Roncero

Without Stars:

Joaquin Felipe
Ángel León
Karlos Arguiñano

In Italy:

Cracco

In France:

Michel Bras
Joel Rubachan

In the USA: In NYC, I like Wylie D. and Tom Keller ( Per Se ). I have not eaten at Grant Achatz´s restaurants because I have not been in Chicago recently, however, I have the highest regards for his work and health battles.

Norman Van Aken is interesting ( Florida ) and in Mexico ( Acapulco ) I have enjoyed Susanna Palazuelos, and in Lima, Perú: Gastón Acurio. Last year I travelled to Sao Paulo, Brazil, and I absolutely flipped over the cuisine of Chef Alex Atala, at D.O.M. He is brilliant.

MC.
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Old 02-13-2012, 07:53 AM   #399
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Greg, I don't understand your feelings about Flay's recipes being complicated. Have you ever seen him prepare any of them? In one respect he's very Asian in approach, in that many of his dishes require a lot of prep time, but relatively little cooking time.

Most of his actual cooking is straight forward. He grills, or frys, or sautes. Nothing much to it after the prep work is done.

To me, "complex" has to do not only with the prep but with the cooking as well. My own Seafood Lollipops With Peach Gastrique, for instance, which requires making a puree, poaching, batter-dipping and deep frying, plus preparation of the gastrique, would be a complex dish; whereas something like Shrimp & Cantaloupe With Mayonaisse Charles would not.

As to his X with Y approach. He's a chef, after all. And most chef-written cookbooks are about the dishes they prepare. By and large, chef's do not produce recipe lists, in the sense that each is isolated. Rather, they write recipes for complete dishes, just as they would serve them. I don't see how Flay is different in this than most chefs.

If you find this too complex you can always break down the dishes into their component parts, and make only those parts that appeal. You can usually tell the components because they're separated by "ands" and "withs" in the title. Keep in mind, though, that those "ands" and "withs" are often what differentiate the dish.

To demonstrate, I grabbed a chef-written book at random, and opened it to whatever recipe appeared. Happened to be Ana Sortun's book Spice, and the recipe is Veal Tagine with Moroccan Spices and Almond Couscous.

The title tells us that veal in some form will be cooked as a tagine, flavored with Moroccan spices in either straight or mixed form, accompanied by an almond couscous. In effect, the couscous is a second dish.

To reduce what you find complex, we could immediately eliminate the couscous. Then take a look at the Moroccan spices. In this case, with one exception, they happen to be used in their dry stage. The exception is harissa, which is a very hot paste common to Moroccan cooking. If you did a lot of this style cooking you would always have it on hand. If not, you would have to mix it up just for this recipe---exactly the way Flay mixes up flavored oils, and barbecue sauces, etc.

While it's easy to conclude that Flay puts chilies into everything, it's not really true. But he does like assertive flavors; it's what marks his style. If you like that sort of thing, then his dishes are right for you. If not, not.

Along those lines, though, many of us have taken to using the term "bold" instead of "spicy." It's more than a matter of semantics. Many, perhaps most, people connote "spicy" with "heat." And that's not always true. Assertive flavors come from many sources, and "spicy" foods are not always hot.
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Old 02-13-2012, 12:08 PM   #400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Did you folks know that during 911 Bobby and his restaurants fed the firefighters, cops and other rescue workers...
I did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Greg, I don't understand your feelings about Flay's recipes being complicated. Have you ever seen him prepare any of them?....

As to his X with Y approach. He's a chef, after all. And most chef-written cookbooks are about the dishes they prepare.....

If you find this too complex you can always ....

Along those lines, though, many of us have taken to using the term "bold" instead of "spicy." It's more than a matter of semantics. Many, perhaps most, people connote "spicy" with "heat." And that's not always true. Assertive flavors come from many sources, and "spicy" foods are not always hot.
You evidently misunderstood me. I totally admire Bobby Flay and I'm a big fan. I don't think his recipes are too complicated, I was just saying that at present they are complicated enough that I need to build my skills and focus on my planning before I attempt any of Flay's recipes. You're probably a better chef than I and maybe you can just whip out Flay recipes with no particular effort. I'm going to need more preparation than that.

His recipes don't look spicy to me. I was simply debating that with another DC member above in the topic. I agree that spicy and heat are different. I like both. In fact I like both a lot, although it's certainly not necessary to have both in every recipe. Some of Flay's recipes look somewhat spicy, some of them look somewhat hot. But all I know is from reading the ingredients and method. I'll have to cook them and see for myself, or eat at one of his restaurants (which is unlikely).

I think Bobby Flay is a great chef. His recipes are usually a bit more complicated than put 5 things in a pot, simmer for an hour and eat it. That's fine with me. I'm up for trying his recipes when I have the necessary skills and the time for advance planning and preparation necessary to cook his recipes.

The topic was "who would you want to cook for you if you were having an important dinner." It doesn't matter if I can cook it or not. I pick Bobby Flay!

I might have picked Julia Child but she isn't available anymore.
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