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Old 04-06-2013, 01:45 AM   #1
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Question Dehydrating Liquid Heavy Cream

Hi everyone out there!
I am having a very difficult time I have an Open Country 700-Watt FD-75SK Dehydrator that I am trying to use to make powdered creamer from liquid heavy cream. But over 26 hours later and it's it looks like yellow vanilla pudding. I began at 115 degrees then changed it to 135 degrees 17 hours later. Now it's gone rancid. I have no idea what temp to use nor how long and there are no instructions on heavy cream. Any help appreciated. Thank you!

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Old 04-06-2013, 07:33 AM   #2
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No advice as I've never attempted this before .. just wondering why you would want to do this with the risk of spoilage so high with cream?

Have you done any searches as to whether or not this will even work ?

I've seen where they can do milk foam but it requires the addition of glucose.

My understanding is that you can't dehydrate fats .. someone will correct me if I am mistaken on this.
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Old 04-06-2013, 12:40 PM   #3
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Thanks MrsLMB,
Back in the 50's they use to make powdered creamer the way it was suppose to be. Then next thing you know, their adding so much processed crap in it it's no longer really food or anything like actual creamer. So how did they do it then I wonder? Also, powdered whole milk is sold, how do they do it? Because I bet I would have had the same trouble with whole milk if i tried.

I found 2 products that are actual powdered creamer, the problem with one is they added sugar. I love sugar but sugar inside heavy whip and whip cream disgusts me so much. The other one does not have sugar....but, is expensive. I would have bought it despite the expense if it wasn't then for the crazy shipping.

I don't know anything about this stuff, but you mentioned not being able to dehydrate fats. I know that creamer is 100% fat, but nuts are 70% and they get dehydrated. But I guess with nuts you're not dealing with the curdling factor.

I really gotta get this right and it's so frustrating when you buy the machine, test it, and it doesn't work. I really hope it can be figured out. Finding a dehydrator locally was so hard, then having to find one that takes liquids was even harder.
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Old 04-06-2013, 01:02 PM   #4
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There's more to making dried milk than just "dehydrating", it's quite the process.

Also, before there was dry powdered milk, looks like the product used by some cultures (done before fancy factories were around) resulted in a paste like substance:
Quote:
While Marco Polo wrote of Mongolian Tatar troops in the time of Kublai Khan who carried sun-dried skimmed milk as "a kind of paste",[1] the first usable commercial production process for dried milk was invented by the Russian chemist M. Dirchoff in 1832. In 1855, T.S. Grimwade took a patent on a dried milk procedure,[2] though a William Newton had patented a vacuum drying process as early as 1837.[3]
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Old 04-06-2013, 02:43 PM   #5
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Thanks Zereh, too bad they don't sell powdered creamer I could just buy. And it's of course crazy hard to find powdered creamer that is just that. When doing a search online, you got all the coffee mate and other junk products or no results at all, even when you type preservative free heavy cream, or dehydrated heavy cream to narrow it down from the commercial products.

Anyway, that was a very useful link in learning how it's done. But isn't there more than one way to do something too? I hope anyway. I guess because everyday people also dehydrate their fruit and jerky, but a business for instance, may have a more complicated method with added advantages because they have the equipment. And while both work, one may taste much different and there may be advantages/disadvantages to either method. Or is there just no way this would ever work with a dehydrator or anything else for the average Joe?
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Old 04-06-2013, 03:22 PM   #6
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It's a long a winding road today trying to help you with your project.

I did find this about sour cream though How to Safely Dehydrate Sour Cream - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com

That was interesting for me. Not sure I would dehydrate any dairy due to the safety issues. I would freeze it though .. knowing you can't whip it once thawed, but it would still be good for everything else.

Well you have a dehydrator so at least you are ready to dehydrate all the upcoming fruits and vegies !

Living in the Pacific NW you are lucky to have good access to those Hood River Cherries and the super fresh salmon as well. I miss those since moving away from that area.
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Old 04-06-2013, 03:41 PM   #7
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[QUOTE=MrsLMB;1256083]It's a long a winding road today trying to help you with your project.

Oh no! Sorry it wasn't my intention to inconvenience anyone. I thought maybe if someone knew off hand...I saw someone had indicated they made their own dehydrated creamer, but they haven't been here since 2010

I did find this about sour cream though How to Safely Dehydrate Sour Cream - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com

That was interesting for me. Not sure I would dehydrate any dairy due to the safety issues. I would freeze it though .. knowing you can't whip it once thawed, but it would still be good for everything else.

Thanks for sharing that interesting link, wish they indicated how they did it, so I could potentially apply it to my cause. I guess that's where the companies that make powdered milk have an edge over what we can do to preserve even if I could make it into powder. I need to not only make it but be able to keep it fresh.

Well you have a dehydrator so at least you are ready to dehydrate all the upcoming fruits and vegies !

Yes and I look forward to that... but just as soon as I figure out this creamer thing because I need it so bad.
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Old 04-06-2013, 04:07 PM   #8
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I found this: Homemade Powdered Coffee Creamer - http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf23570283.tip.html

It uses powdered milk, a bit of sugar, since natural cream is somewhat sweet, and coconut oil. You can decrease the amount of sugar to suit your taste.

There are a lot of commercial processes that are impractical or unsafe for home cooks. Hth.
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Old 04-06-2013, 07:03 PM   #9
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Does your particular piece of equipment have instructions for dehydrating heavy cream? Maybe it's not a process meant for a Open Country 700-Watt FD-75SK.
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Old 04-06-2013, 10:08 PM   #10
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Thank you Got Garlic & OldVine.

OldVine, there are no instructions on heavy cream, but it does liquids which many machines don't, I figured they wouldn't list every liquid out there, but the most popular (ie spagetti sauce) and since milk can be dehydrated I figured why not?

Got Garlic, thank you for the link. I need everything to be in powder form, like a dry clean mix, rather than what the coconut will do when mixed. I just need to make sure it's vacuum sealed and that it's dehydrated properly. Because the nonfat powdered milk at the store does not look like it will have issues of any kind for a loooong time. That is what I seek to make, but in cream form.

I can't taste any sugar in heavy cream. Per the label, heavy cream has 0 grams of sugar. It's not sweet like milk at all. It's only creamy and super rich. Perfect for diabetics in my family and god knows we hate the taste of sweet whip cream.
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