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Old 11-11-2006, 12:19 PM   #1
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Another Brining Experiment...

in preparation for the LSU vs Alabama game, my father is brining some chicken for the bbq... here's the recipe handed to him from a buddy:

1/3 cup kosher salt
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup myer's dark rum
2 minced jalapeno peppers
1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 T hickory smoke flavoring
2 T whole allspice
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 T sweet, dehydrated bell peppers
Durkee all-purpose seasoning (no salt)

1. dissolve the sugar, salt, and syrup in hot water and quickly cool the mixture down by dumping-in about a tray of ice cubes.
2. prep the remaining ingredients and add to an 8-10 quart SST bowl-making sure the water temperature is COLD.
3. clean the chicken and add to the bowl and fill with COLD water to completely cover the chicken.
4. add a few more ice cubes on top to help keep the chicken under water.
5. refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours and up to 6 hours.

he's using this brine for 2 whole chickens cut into quarters. i'll let y'all know how it turns out later.

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Old 11-11-2006, 12:59 PM   #2
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I just "came to" from fainting over this one! YUMMMMMMY - thanks for posting this - it sounds absolutely.....what's the best word you can think of?
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Old 11-11-2006, 02:49 PM   #3
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But you know, that isn't technically a "brine". It is a marinade and therefore sounds REALLY great to me, the one of 8 people in the world that does not brine poultry!!!
It does sound good.
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Old 11-11-2006, 02:52 PM   #4
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Gretchen I am not sure I agree that this is a marinade. Where is the acid?

This sounds like another interesting one black chef. I can't wait to hear how it turned out.
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:02 PM   #5
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Marinades don't always have to have acid in them. There are marinades that use enzymatic action, primarily, too.

This is supposed to be a brine because of the salt, though it doesn't say how much water is used. In the correct proportion, it will act like a brine, drawing the liquid into the cells, infusing the meat. But you need to use a suffieient amount of salt for that to happen.

If no water is used it might have too much salt.

Brines work differently than marinades.

But still way too much sugar for me.
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:08 PM   #6
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What would define a marinade then?

The enzymatic action you are talking about is for tenderizing I am assuming. A marinade does not need always need to be for that purpose though does it? Can't it just be for flavor?

Just doing some quick research, and that that this site is totally right, but it looks like this says that your are right Jenny in that it does not always have to have acid.
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Marinades don't always have to have acid in them. There are marinades that use enzymatic action, primarily, too.

This is supposed to be a brine because of the salt, though it doesn't say how much water is used. In the correct proportion, it will act like a brine, drawing the liquid into the cells, infusing the meat. But you need to use a suffieient amount of salt for that to happen.

If no water is used it might have too much salt.

Brines work differently than marinades.

But still way too much sugar for me.
well, he used 2 cups of hot water to dissolve the salt and sugar... then, he quickly cooled that down with a tray of ice cubes. after cleaning the chicken, he added it to a stainless steel bowl, filled it with enough water to cover the chicken, and then, dumped about half of an ice tray of ice cubes on top to submerge the chicken.

it's been in the fridge since this a.m... I'm about to remove it; it's been in the brine for about 4 hours.
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:43 PM   #8
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I just meant it isn't a "brine" as it is usually done--1C salt to 1 gallon liquid, etc. There isn't any water--that was the point of saying it isn't a brine.

And marinade could be something as simple as a soy sauce mixture--no acid there.

And I don't call the salt alone a brine here either because usually when a "dry brine" is being used, it is that--dry, without any liquid--as in liberally salting the chicken and letting sit (which is what I do and have done for 30 years).
A marinade can be just about anything you want.
I think it sounds like a sticky gooey good mess to put on chicken!
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:47 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
I just meant it isn't a "brine" as it is usually done--1C salt to 1 gallon liquid, etc. There isn't any water--that was the point of saying it isn't a brine.

And marinade could be something as simple as a soy sauce mixture--no acid there.

And I don't call the salt alone a brine here either because usually when a "dry brine" is being used, it is that--dry, without any liquid--as in liberally salting the chicken and letting sit (which is what I do and have done for 30 years).
A marinade can be just about anything you want.
I think it sounds like a sticky gooey good mess to put on chicken!
Gretchen, let me clarify... and i should have made this clear upfront.

when i brine poultry or fish, i completely submerge it in a cold water bath... complete with all the seasonings mentioned above.

sorry for the confusion... but this was not to be taken as a rub or "marinade."
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Old 11-11-2006, 03:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by black chef
Gretchen, let me clarify... and i should have made this clear upfront.

when i brine poultry or fish, i completely submerge it in a cold water bath... complete with all the seasonings mentioned above.

sorry for the confusion... but this was not to be taken as a rub or "marinade."
Yeah, I kind of got hung out. ;o) It is a brine.
Edited to say, you posted while I was posting--then I deleted one message (perhaps the one you quoted) and I re-posted another--all in the twinkling of an eye. I'm gone. I would use it as a marinade, and may do so.
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