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Old 03-02-2008, 09:57 AM   #11
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I have cooked capon and , frankly, not a big fan. A Capon is a castrated male chicken. By castrating, the bird becomes much more lazy and non-aggressive. The meat becomes more tender and much milder in flavor. Now, for the last 20 years or so I have been trying to find chicken that had more flavor rather than the bland commercially produced birds that are far more common. Thus, the mildness of the capon just doesn't do anything for me. Just my opinion.
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Old 03-02-2008, 04:56 PM   #12
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Hola de Panamá, Bubba.
The larger breast meat is not to my preference either. But I like the size for a nice meal of fowl more than a chicken and less than a turkey.
So if you do not like capon, do you have another bird that you enjoy eating. And, for my selfish reasons, one with more dark meat, as well as white?
Also, for me, the question of whether to brine fowl or not is an important one to me. What do you think, Bubba?
Thanks, Martín
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Old 03-02-2008, 05:15 PM   #13
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My grandma used to cook a capon sometimes for the holiday. She always cooked her birds too long, though, I think. I remember them being dry, even though she covered the breast with cheesecloth and kept it basted with butter.
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Old 03-02-2008, 07:57 PM   #14
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mbasiszta;
If I am going to roast a bird whether in my indoor oven or on my grill. I am going to brine it. The difference in moisture level of the brined as opposed to unbrined bird is so obvious that it just doesn't make much sense to me not to. In addition, I just can't pass up the opportunity to add more flavor.
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Old 03-02-2008, 08:29 PM   #15
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Hi Bubba,
Thank you for your opinion on the use of the brine procedure. You comment makes sense to me so I am going to follow your advice.
Much appreciated.
Marty
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Old 03-28-2008, 09:23 AM   #16
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Yikes! I just discovered that Capon is $4.65 a pound here in Panama.
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Old 04-19-2008, 02:10 AM   #17
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Capopn is very popular in France. I just cook as for chicken & make sure I let it rest before serving. I always stuff 2 halved lemons in the cavity & perhaps fresh bay & garlic. I like it because the chickens here are so tiny!!
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Old 04-19-2008, 08:26 AM   #18
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lol, m!

the bird could run from sniper fire and amorous ex-presidents much more quickly.
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Old 04-19-2008, 12:25 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbaGourmet View Post
mbasiszta;
If I am going to roast a bird whether in my indoor oven or on my grill. I am going to brine it. The difference in moisture level of the brined as opposed to unbrined bird is so obvious that it just doesn't make much sense to me not to. In addition, I just can't pass up the opportunity to add more flavor.
Yo, Bubba! You are right. I brined a small turkey and the meat turned out more moist than I have ever been able to cook. Thanks a bunch.

Guess your suggestion was a no-briner. RO LOL
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