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Old 09-13-2004, 09:19 PM   #1
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Anyone ever cook a Capon?

In an earlier thread, I noticed where one of the regulars likes to cook a 10# chicken. I commented on where the heck could you find a bird that big? Well, today, I found one. Actually, several. Right next to the frozen turkeys, were a bunch of frozen Capons. They're a little pricey, though, running about $2.54/#. A 10# bird cost $26.00. I can buy a slightly bigger turkey for cheaper than that!

My question is, though, how does a Capon rate, quality-wise, compared to your basic, run-of-the-mill chicken?

BTW, for those that don't know, a Capon is a young castrated rooster.

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Old 09-14-2004, 08:01 AM   #2
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I had it once in a restaurant and it was good, but everything in that restaurant was good - I don't know if I'd have similar results at home. I do know turkey is on sale for 68 cents a pound this week, and I'm always happy with the results, so I'll be going that route.
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Old 09-14-2004, 10:03 AM   #3
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Quality wise, I think it's a little more flavorful than chicken; there's obviously more meat to it, and bigger white meat portions.

Roast it as you would a chicken, and just adjust your cooking times.
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Old 09-19-2004, 10:22 AM   #4
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For those of you who like white meat..a Capon would be your choice..as they have more white meat than your everyday chicken. Therefore cooking and keeping moist is the challange..brining would be the thing to do.
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Old 09-20-2004, 05:53 PM   #5
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Capon by its' nature is a tougher bird, and lends itself better to moist heat then it would to open roasting. I rinse out the cavity well and then season it with kosher salt and black pepper. The I brush the entire bird on the outside with butter and olive oil mixed together. I place it on a rack inside a large roasting pan then pour an entire bottle of champagne over it. (I use a cheaper Andre or Cooks will do nicely). I then season the bird with salt pepper, granular garlic, poultry seasoning, and paprika. Then I cover the roaster with the lid or an aluminum tent. It goes into a 350 degree oven at 25 minutes per pound or until a thermometer inserted into the thigh leg region reads 160. I take off the foil or lid, then place it back in for another 30 minutes or so to brown nicely. I make a great sauce from the drippings.
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Old 09-27-2004, 02:19 PM   #6
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When my grandma was alive, all she would cook for Thanksgiving were capons. It was for all of the reasons mentioned already--quantity of white meat, flavor, etc. She roasted hers just as you would a turkey. It seemed to always turn out well. And as doctorfood mentioned, the drippings do make a wonderfully flavorful gravy. (doctorfood, where in the UP are you from--my family's in Escanaba).
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Old 10-12-2004, 10:57 PM   #7
 
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LOL!

To understand "Capon", you must understand the males of any species...

One only the "pecker" at the top end works, this bird bulks up with the increased feeding (think of eunuchs!) and muscle tone, and arrives to market oversized, over muscled and strongly flavoured...

A premium "chicken", with some costs involved in sorting out, plus the clinical "procedure" involved (would there be mortality rates?) a capon is well worth the extra nickles in cost...I mean like eating is probably the biggest joy that God arranged for us to have on a thrice daily basis, and good cooking is what its all about after that!

Compared with a 12 lb turkey (which carries a lot of bone weight!) a capon is a relative bargain...

I have to somewhat disagree with "doctorfood" in that I think the doc' is overcooking with that extra 30 minutes, and that's where the 'toughness" is coming from...with all the extra white meat, the challenge is to keep the white meat to a finished temp of 160, and get the dark to the 180 level; thus the various strategies of brining and "flipping" (if "flipped", you'd want it left inverted longer!)(and the finishing temperature raised?)
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Old 03-01-2008, 03:19 PM   #8
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Capons: to brine or not?

In 'Shogun' the capon was regaled as a wonderful fowl meal. My question is whether members here recommend brineing (sp?) this bird, as one usually does with a turkey?
My personal preferance is for the dark meat of bird, but to keep my better half happy, I have to cook her lots of white meat. <grin>
Thank you for any suggestions.
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Old 03-01-2008, 03:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chez suz View Post
For those of you who like white meat..a Capon would be your choice..as they have more white meat than your everyday chicken. Therefore cooking and keeping moist is the challange..brining would be the thing to do.
I tend to favor dark meat.
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Old 03-01-2008, 03:33 PM   #10
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Dark meat it is!

We agree on the dark meat being the tastiest and juciest.

If they can castrate a male chicken and get huge breasts,
can't they sterilize a female chicken and get huge thighs?
(Like Hillary?) hahaha
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