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Old 09-03-2012, 03:43 PM   #21
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Old 09-03-2012, 04:08 PM   #22
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Well I did this in the oven on my stand. It was lovely! I used Kokanee beer, tossed in a couple cloves of garlic and a pile of sage and thyme. Rubbed the outside with lemon and salt. It was DELISH! I don't remember who said the beer doesn't flavor the chicken, but just as a note, the beer might not flavor the chicken, but the herbs inside the beer definitely were noticeable.

My family want to try Cerise's recipe next time, so that's going to be our next chicken dinner.
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:35 PM   #23
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Well I did this in the oven on my stand. It was lovely! I used Kokanee beer, tossed in a couple cloves of garlic and a pile of sage and thyme. Rubbed the outside with lemon and salt. It was DELISH! I don't remember who said the beer doesn't flavor the chicken, but just as a note, the beer might not flavor the chicken, but the herbs inside the beer definitely were noticeable.

My family want to try Cerise's recipe next time, so that's going to be our next chicken dinner.
Just messing with you, but the other flavorings coming from putting stuff in the beer can ? I suppose so...especially for convenience , but wouldn't coating the inside of the cavity with flavorings do even better, thus leaving only the liquid in the can to keep it moist.

Also..I mentioned using a 16 oz. beer can for full sized chickens. For even better stand placement, most stores now sell bigger 24 oz. single beer cans.
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:49 AM   #24
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Caslon, I've roasted a LOT of chickens using a lot of different methods of "flavoring". I've found that brining just imparts moisture, not flavor so any flavoring in the brine is useless.

Rubbing stuff in the cavity or stuffing things in the cavity imparts delicate flavor to the chicken, but the aroma is the biggest thing. We taste with our noses first I have heard. I don't find the taste to be significantly different between rubbing stuff in there or just dumping it in the beer.

I've only done a couple of beer can chickens, and I find them to be moist and tender without brining. Since I have largish hands, going the lazy way and dumping stuff into the beer to flavor this little chicken was far more appealing than attempting to cram my hand inside the chicken to rub herbs in there.

So, my conclusion is that if I don't have the time to brine a bird to make it tender and juicy, I'll cram a can up its rear end and roast it that way. I'll continue to use various herbs for flavoring (in the beer) cuz I'm a lazy bum!

One thing I sure do miss are the farm chickens I used to get. They were the size of small turkeys and sooooo tasty. Ah well, c'est la vie.
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Old 09-10-2012, 03:33 PM   #25
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I'm wondering if you could do that upside down. That way the dark meat would be the most exposed to heat and cook faster. It would also mean that the juices inside the chicken would drain towards the white meat.
I got a chicken and a beer, so I tried to do it this way. The neck area was too tight, so I clipped either side of the backbone... too big. I settled on pouring the beer over and under the chicken along with sage, tarragon, thyme, garlic powder and some dried minced onions.

I put the chicken breast side down in the liquid and am braising it (covered) in a stew pot. I'll turn the chicken over in an hour.

I'm not going to get crispy skin, but it is there for the flavoring.

I'm wondering if those chicken stands can work upside down.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:34 AM   #26
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alix, i have to disagree about brining only adding moisture, not flavour.

i've been working on a copycat brine for pork chops that's specific reason is to add flavour (garlic and bay) as well as moisture.

the secret my be that alcohol is added to the brine, so the flavours may be carried along into the meat tissue as alcohol soluble. i'm not sure, though. just a thought.
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:45 AM   #27
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If you've ever used the Good Eats recipe for Thanksgiving turkey, you'll see that brining delivers flavor to the bird. It's all about what you put in the brine. I've never used alcohol in a brine.
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:55 AM   #28
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If you've ever used the Good Eats recipe for Thanksgiving turkey, you'll see that brining delivers flavor to the bird. It's all about what you put in the brine. I've never used alcohol in a brine.
Isn't it also a question of how long you brine?
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:05 AM   #29
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Isn't it also a question of how long you brine?

If you brine long enough for the brine to be effective, it will deliver. "Long enough" depends on the size and shape of the meat. Flat pieces like chops take less time while thicker pieces like poultry or roasts take longer.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:07 AM   #30
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The beer can chicken, without the can, was incredibly tender and moist.

I've never brined chicken (high blood pressure), and after making it this way, I probably never will.

I got 3+ cups of broth, plus enough to mix with a packet of chicken gravy mix. Really rich and yummy. No salt was used in this dish except for whatever might have been in the beer.
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