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Old 10-03-2006, 05:12 PM   #11
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Sorry you don't like chicken. Try rubbing down the chicken with the herbs de provence. If the chicken has skin, try to get the herbs under the skin, and then bake it in white wine until juices run clear. Garlic and lemon are good with chicken. Rosemary is good with chicken.
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Old 10-03-2006, 07:49 PM   #12
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I always, always, ALWAYS have a one or two packages of boneless skinless chicken thighs in the freezer. For stirfries, curries, & braises they stay so much more moist & tender. And skinless, they're really not higher in fat than the pricier breasts.

Although I'm not a fan of processed foods, I have to admit that I do love cutting up a package of boneless skinless thighs & adding them to a Zatarains rice mix (any of them) & serving it with a green salad. Dinner can be on the table in about 20-25 minutes.

Another quickie would be to cut them into bite-size pieces, saute them in a little olive oil, & then toss in a bag of mixed frozen vegetables & continue stirfrying until everything is cooked through.

You can also look into other poultry options like baking chicken drumsticks with various herbs & vegetable sides, or another big favorite in our household are the flavored chicken & turkey sausages available in most markets these days. One package gives my husband & two or three nice size sausages apiece, & those & a salad are quite a filling meal.
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Old 10-03-2006, 08:41 PM   #13
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Breast meat contains 1.24 grams of total fat per 100 grams of raw meat. Dark meat contains 4.31 grams of total fat per 100 grams of raw meat. While neither is a huge amount, one is about three and a half times the other.
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Old 10-03-2006, 09:22 PM   #14
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What I did
I took about 2 tbsp of jerk seasoning and ground it up and whisked it with about a quarter cup of olive oil. I poured that into a baking dish and then rubbed it into the chicken well. Then I vac sealed a couple pieces and let sit for 10 mins and then 1 piece went into the George foreman.
George cooks slow. DW says flavor was good but needed to sit longer. So I re vac sealed the other 4 pieces. Will either pan brown with vege's tomorrow or will saute the vege's and pan grill the chicken and then bake to 185 and then serve with the veges over rice.
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Old 10-04-2006, 01:26 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
You can try Chinese restaurant-style Lemon Chicken. I normally use skinless boneless thighs. Also, please omit the ginger. This dish tastes much better without it.

Vilasman, very nice of you to cook for your wife and to care about her diet.
Chopstix,

your recipe says marinate in custard powder and ginger overnight. here you say omit the ginger, and what is this custard powder - what does it do? thanks.
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Old 10-04-2006, 08:12 AM   #16
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Personally, I think chicken is one of those foods where it's underdone, underdone, underdone, DONE, overdone, overdone, overdone...

There is a very narrow range between gristle and sawdust where it tastes fantastic, juicy, and memorable. I also grew up with people who cooked food until it resembled either solid polypropylene or carbon.

Nice thing about chicken is that you can cook it with almost every method available and it goes with almost everything too. Just be careful about cooking it to the right temps!
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Old 10-04-2006, 08:36 AM   #17
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Whats the right temp. I have a food thermometer here that says 185F and I heard on TV today it was 165F. What is it?
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Old 10-04-2006, 09:58 AM   #18
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Salmonella (if present in your chicken) is killed instantly at 160F. That's the minimum for safety. 165-170 is what I shoot for.

IMO, 185 will yield dry chicken.
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Old 10-04-2006, 10:37 AM   #19
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Quote:
I also have the following herb blends
Herbs de Provence
Oh so Garlic
Cajun Bayou
Pepper blend
South of the Border
Jamaican Jerk
and Garlic Seasoning and rub
each of these will be good with chicken, depending upon what flavors you're going for!

Happy Cooking!
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Old 10-04-2006, 02:37 PM   #20
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I like theighs/legs cooked to 180F throughout, and breastmeat cooked to 165F throughout. The dark meat is much more flexible, as it has more fat that melts and coats the muscle fibers and can mask a slightly overcooked piece. The breastmeat is extremely lean, and I find that 180F is sawdust, whereas 160F is a bit too underdone. Shoot for 165F-169F - keep it under 170 for breastmeat. The result will be relaxed/tender muscles that haven't seized up and squeezed all the moisture out.

Thus is the quandary of a whole roasted bird where two different temps are desired...

So long as the entire piece of meat/bone has reached 160F, there will be no salmonella worries.
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