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Old 08-06-2006, 04:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
1. Does it have a really "beery" flavour?
Nope, it is just mosit and delicious, but not beery tasting at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
2. Do you brine your chicken first?
I like to brine my chicken no matter how I am preparing it, but it is certainly not necessary with beer butt chicken. The end result is so juicy even without a brine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
3. What herbs do you put in the beer?
I actually just use beer and nothing else, but anything you have on hand could work.
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Old 08-06-2006, 04:43 PM   #12
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Alix,

I rarely brine anything, including beer butt chicken. But there are a lot of brining proponents out there, since you need to cook the thigh to 180 and the breast is best at 160 - brining keeps the breast moist while the dark meat is getting up to temp.

I don't find it necessary with beer butt.

No, it does not taste beery. And don't bother putting anything in the half can of beer - you won't be able to taste it in the chicken. If you want herbs, then place some under the skin before you cook it.

Make sure you oil it and sprinkle a tasty rub on it (or at least S & P with garlic powder and a little paprika for color)

I just sit the chicken on it's legs and it's can (so to speak) and try not to lift the lid of the grill very often. I have not had one tip over yet.

Lee
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Old 08-07-2006, 01:23 AM   #13
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OK folks here is the final shakedown. We ended up with guests coming over for dinner so I had to stretch things a bit. I couldn't fit the dang chicken in the oven with the beer up its behind, ditto the BBQ. So...I ended up just roasting that sucker and tossing a couple of extra breasts in just in case. Sigh. I will have to get a smaller chicken to try the beer thing I guess. My oven won't handle the farm chickens that way.

Gretchen, where I come from I get farm fresh chickens twice a year that vary from 7-13lbs. They are young, tender and delicious no matter how I cook them. Never had a bad one yet. They really are huge though. They easily feed 8 people with leftovers. This was one of our smallish ones so when I invited our company over I decided I needed to cook extra just in case they were extra hungry after their travels. LOL.

Thanks to you all for answering all my questions. When I get a small chicken I am going to just shove the beer can up there and not worry about flavoring the beer at all. And I am going to try it first without brining, just to see if it is really all that moist and tender.
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Old 08-07-2006, 08:06 AM   #14
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With respect to brining, I am in the "I don't like what it does to poultry" camp so obviously, I don't. The only thing I brine is frozen shrimp--for about 30 minutes. It does restore them nicely to nice plumpness and juiciness.

I am amazed by Alix's chickens and glad they are so good. That would definitely not be the case in the US.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:13 AM   #15
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OK, at the risk of sounding stupid... What do you mean by Brining, And what is it's benefit? Also is this only for chicken or is it for Turkey, and other poultry as well?
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:19 AM   #16
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Brining involves soaking meat in a salty brine solution. typically, salt, sugar and seasonings in water.

The brining adds flavor and moisture to the meat and you end up with a jucier end result.

Typically, you would brine turkey, chicken and pork. Beef and lamb do not need brining. It worls best with very lean meats.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:28 AM   #17
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Brining is soaking the meat in a salty sugar solution. I've done it with pork and poultry. I makes the meat moister. You can also add flavors of choice with the water. That's it in a nutshell. CJS does alot of brining if I remember correctly. I'm sure she'll find the thread.

Alton Brown has a good show on brining, if you check foodtv.com.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:32 AM   #18
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The trick to brining is getting the right mix of salt to water (and anything else you add in like sugar or spices) and to getting the timing right. If you brine too long then the texture of the meat will suffer. It is not hard to figure out how to do it right though. I am a HUGE fan of brining.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:33 AM   #19
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Fryers are best for beer can chicken. No need to brine them...and no, they don't taste like beer.

Beer Can Chicken with Memphis Rub
Melts in your mouth...

Ingredients:
whole chickens
1 beer per chicken

Memphis Rub:
1/4 cup paprika
1 tbl brown sugar, frimly packed
1 tbl granulated sugar
2 tsp salt
1 tsp celery salt
1 tsp black pepper, fresh ground
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1-3 tsp cayenne pepper

Directions:
Mix ingredients for Memphis Rub. (Make extra...it's good on lots of things.)
Preheat grill to medium (about 375 degrees). Rub chicken liberally, inside and out, with seasoning mix.
Drink half the beer, then insert the can up the chicken's butt. Set on grill using legs and can as a tripod. Close the grill and leave it closed for about 1 hour, or until the juices run clear when chicken is pricked with fork. I always check to see if the thigh wiggles loose.
The can will be hot, so wrap a towel around it when you pull it out of the chicken.

I always do two chickens while we're at it, and then I have some extra cooked chicken for another meal.
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Old 08-07-2006, 10:35 AM   #20
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Gretchen, come on up and have a chicken dinner with us sometime. Sorry you can't get the same birds there.

As to the brining, I have found that I really don't need to brine my chickens as they are usually tender, flavourful and moist without it. Turkey on the other hand really requires it. I have also come around to the pork brining camp. WOW that makes a difference.

GB maybe you can help here. I read a snippet somewhere that brining was originally done in making food kosher. Is that right?
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