"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-19-2009, 03:44 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Able Hands's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Garner, NC
Posts: 38
Buttermilk Brine for Fried Chicken

I'm going to try fried chicken for the first time tonight. I've read through a bunch of posts, and many of them call for a one hour soak in a butter milk brine.

Hopefully I can get a quick answer to a noob question...

How much salt, etc. do you add? Does anyone have basic proportions?

I've seen it said for a water brine to make it taste like sea water, a taste I have made myself forget. Not to mention that I have never tasted buttermilk seawater.

I love the site, and I have already gained a lot from it. I just wish it were easier to find recipes. A search for buttermilk brine results in 265 hits on this site. Searching for buttermilk brine recipes gives me 283 hits. I don't plan far enough ahead to look through that many posts to see if I can find what I am looking for. Perhaps I need to plan a little better, but you know how it is when you get an idea in your head. And I don't have enough skill yet to just wing it.

HELP!!!

Matt

__________________

__________________
Able Hands is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2009, 04:11 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,408
Matt, you don't have to salt the buttermilk as you would water. Just use enough buttermilk to cover the chicken and add whatever seasonings you want. Try some garlic and onion powders and black pepper. You can mix the same seasonings into the coating as well. You'll want to season the buttermilk fairly heavily as most of the seasonings will stay behind in the buttermilk after you take out the chicken.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2009, 05:00 PM   #3
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I think part of the confusion is coming from the terms you are using. I have seen brines using water and I have seen buttermilksoaks for chicken, but never a buttermilk brine. That is not to say that you can't do that of course.

Like Andy suggested, don't try to season the buttermilk like you are making a water brine. Don't think of the buttermilk as a brine and you will be better off. Chicken soaking in buttermilk usually stays submerged for 24-48 hours. Chicken in a brine usually soaks for around 2 hours (for pieces). Each technique qill give you different results.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2009, 05:39 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Able Hands's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Garner, NC
Posts: 38
Confusion...

My confusion actually comes from this forum... Along with a healthy dose of ignorance.

In post #19 of "My Ex used to make the best fried chicken..." (can't post links yet)

User Bacardi made mention of adding salt to the buttermilk to make a brine.

I also saw it mentioned in a few other posts, and on other sites as well.

I tried to post this once before, and had a lot more information, but lost it. Sorry for the brevity. I have something in the works right now, and if it works, I'll let you all know.

Matt

[EDIT - here is the link: My Ex used to make the best fried chicken ... - Michael in FtW]
__________________
Able Hands is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2009, 09:40 PM   #5
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Able Hands, one tsp of salt to a cup or so of buttermilk is perfect. I add some chile flakes to mine too. Yummy.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2009, 07:06 AM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Able Hands's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Garner, NC
Posts: 38
Way undercooked

Well,

I did the buttermilk brine:

Buttermilk, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, nutmeg.

That set in the fridge for about an hour and a half.

I used Paula Deans Southern Fried Chicken recipe, and cooked per those instructions. I used a 13" cast iron pan filled about 2/3 with crisco. Heated to 350*-375*. I was cooking legs and thighs, so I went with the longer time of 14 minutes. Because I could not fully submerge the pieces, I started at 7-minutes per side. Wife took one of the early pieces and it was extremely undercooked. I upped the time by about three minutes and all it accomplished was burning the breading. I put all of the pieces into a 350* oven for 30 minutes, and they were done... FINALLY!!

I checked my thermometer in boiling water before I started and calibrated it accordingly, so I know my temp was within a few degrees. I only put 4 pieces in the pan to make sure I wasn't crowding. But the chicken was still undercooked.

So how can I fry chicken without having to go to the oven? Not that I mind going into the oven, I'm just curious. Since we both gagged at the site of the underdone food, I had leftover twice baked spuds, and I don't think she ate at all. Another first time recipe that didn't quite work. The breading was great, nice and crunchy with tons of flavor. We'll have it for dinner tonight.
__________________
Able Hands is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2009, 08:09 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,394
Matt you will notice that the recipe you went by called for a 2 1/2 Lb. Chicken...If your chicken was larger....Say 3 1/2 to 4 lbs. then the 14 minute frying time would not work. Obviously it would take longer...

Suggest you invest in an instant read thermometer and cook your chicken pieces to a minimum of 165* F... (Not By minutes on a clock)...The USDA says that some consumers, "for reasons of personal preference, may chose to cook poultry to higher temperatures." --- I personally will eat 160*/165* Chicken breast, but I want dark meat...thighs and legs cooked to around 180*....Again, until you gain experience frying chicken use a thermometer... not a clock....HTH

Have Fun & Enjoy!!!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2009, 11:43 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 8,545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Matt you will notice that the recipe you went by called for a 2 1/2 Lb. Chicken...If your chicken was larger....Say 3 1/2 to 4 lbs. then the 14 minute frying time would not work. Obviously it would take longer...

Suggest you invest in an instant read thermometer and cook your chicken pieces to a minimum of 165* F... (Not By minutes on a clock)...The USDA says that some consumers, "for reasons of personal preference, may chose to cook poultry to higher temperatures." --- I personally will eat 160*/165* Chicken breast, but I want dark meat...thighs and legs cooked to around 180*....Again, until you gain experience frying chicken use a thermometer... not a clock....HTH

Have Fun & Enjoy!!!
i agree!! i cook breasts and wings to 170F, i watch the color for turning and most of all i LISTEN. when the spitting and sizzling slows it's a good sign that the chicken is done or almost done (sort of like when you pop corn in the micro, when the popping soumds slows down it time to take it out). then i take it's temp.


btw i like to soak chicken with salt for 2 reasons 1 - to give deep flavor and 2 - it pulls most of the blood out. i hate biting into chicken and find cooked blood!! i don't do blood very well

i almost passed out when i was a teenage candy stripper at the hospital and a nurse handed me a bag of warm blood to take somewhere.
__________________

__________________
Your hand and your mouth agreed many years ago that, as far as chocolate is concerned, there is no need to involve your brain. -Dave Barry
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.