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Old 12-28-2006, 04:18 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Yes.

Meat temperature is what matters.
Thank you!

It's not just me. I just know that when I show my sister this article from the USDA, she'll want to cross reference it and she'll point out that it says "pink meat" not "pink juices".
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:30 PM   #32
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For such a long time, people have been bombarded with the statement that poultry MUST BE COOKED WELL DONE! Instructions often say to cook until the juices run clear.

That's a lot of indoctrination to overcome! Good luck.

My SO will cannot accept pink juices or even the purple stains on and around bones. It just freaks her out and she runs to the microwave with her portion to "finish cooking it".
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:33 PM   #33
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My mother cooks her turkey for like an hour a pound till it has a hard crust. SHe repeatedly tells me that she doesn't like "rare" poultry. To her, if it isn't hard on the outside, it's rare.
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:36 PM   #34
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Here is the email response from Butterball:

__________________________________________________ ____________

Thank you for contacting the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line via the Internet!
I am sorry you felt you weren't handled professionally during your call to Customer Service. Did you speak to Customer Service or to the Butterball Turkey-Talk-Line? Regardless, I will forward your e-mail to the Talk-Line Director. We have received calls regarding the USDA guidelines and I can provide you with Butterball's response at this time.

Yes, the USDA recommends 165 degrees F as a safe end point temperature for cooked turkey. This is particularly important for stuffed turkey. When the stuffing reaches 165 degrees F the turkey is done.

Use a meat thermometer to determine doneness-especially important with fast cook methods such as a convection oven, high temperature foil wrap or "oven cooking bag" and for very large turkeys where the thigh may be done before the stuffing or breast.

For both safety and eating quality, Butterball recommends an end point temperature of 180 degrees F taken deep in the lower inner thigh of the turkey (close to the joint where the thigh attaches to the carcass); the thickest part of the breast reaches 170 degrees F; and the center of the stuffing reaches 165 degrees F.


It is not unusual to see clear pink juices inside the turkey, especially when roasted unstuffed. Frozen turkeys (with added basting) tend to have more juices and if the turkey was not completely thawed a greater amount of liquid could accumulate in the cavity.

Butterball turkeys are young turkeys and the bones are not completely hardened. The bone marrow contains the pigment (myoglobin) that colors blood. As the turkey cooks, this pigment can accumulate into the juices of the turkey collecting in the body cavity or next to the bone. This is more likely with fast cook methods (e.g. oven cooking bag and convection oven) due to incomplete denaturation of the myoglobin during the shorter cook time. Juices in the cavity should be at least 165 degrees F when the turkey is done.

NOTE: Use a meat thermometer to determine turkey doneness -- especially important with fast cook methods such as convection oven or "oven cooking bag" and for very large turkeys where thigh may be done before stuffing or breast. When done, the turkey thigh (joint where thigh joins carcass) should register 180-185 degrees F., thickest part of breast 170 -175 degrees F. and center of stuffing 165 degrees F.


Don't hesitate to contact us again for additional information or advice. If you would like to speak with one of our Butterball Turkey Talk-Line experts, call the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line at 1-800-BUTTERBALL (1-800-288-8372). When calling be sure to ask for a set of "Butterball Recipe Cards," a brand new collection of delicious holiday dishes from the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line.
Enjoy the best of all from Butterball!
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:38 PM   #35
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I'd have asked for a free turkey!!!
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Old 12-28-2006, 04:42 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
I'd have asked for a free turkey!!!


The email is from the Turkey hotline...I spoke to Customer Service...maybe they're sick of hearing people ask this...but with the USDA changing the required temperature and all this year...they should have something up on their website's FAQS or something to address it. But what do I know?
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