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Old 03-30-2008, 09:00 PM   #31
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I can see why LT would not want to stuff chicken with Ekte Gjetost cheese now that I know what it is.
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Old 03-31-2008, 10:04 AM   #32
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I can see why LT would not want to stuff chicken with Ekte Gjetost cheese now that I know what it is.
yeah that stuff is nasty. Cheese should not have a fudge like texture and taste like carmeled milk. Its more of a texture like fudge mixed with peanut butter.

Whenever i hear goat cheese, this is the first cheese that comes to me mind.
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Old 04-02-2008, 12:34 AM   #33
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For chicken marsalla I don't use a tenderizing hammer. A basic french rolling pin straight round no handles it is like a 2' diameter wooden dowel or a mini baseball bat. Slice open a heavy grade 1 gallon freezer bag along the seams. then put the boneless chicken breast on half fold the other half over and start swating. The rounded pin helps spread the meat out not just crush. The heavy weight of the plastic survives all the pounding and you can move pieces in the plastic easily as they don't stick to it. Found that the end can equal the face of a mallet if you have to work a firmer spot. It is easy to spin a piece in the plastic to hit from all directions. I pound on a cutting board close to the edge of the counter to avoid having my fingers between the pin and counter top.
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Old 04-02-2008, 08:09 AM   #34
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oneoffour I am curious, why do you slice the bag open? Why not just put the chicken in the bag without sealing it?
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Old 04-02-2008, 02:56 PM   #35
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oneoffour I am curious, why do you slice the bag open? Why not just put the chicken in the bag without sealing it?
Thanks for asking GB,
As it thins out it sticks to the plastic as I learned the first time I did it. On that first time I tried to pull the chicken out of the bag it was so thin it pulled apart. Now I slice the freezer bag open along the seams so I can separate the plastic from the chicken as one would the back of contact paper. Handling by the plastic the chicken can be gently placed either in flour or onto a piece of wax paper for easy further handling.
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:09 PM   #36
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For chicken marsalla I don't use a tenderizing hammer. A basic french rolling pin straight round no handles it is like a 2' diameter wooden dowel or a mini baseball bat. Slice open a heavy grade 1 gallon freezer bag along the seams. then put the boneless chicken breast on half fold the other half over and start swating. The rounded pin helps spread the meat out not just crush. The heavy weight of the plastic survives all the pounding and you can move pieces in the plastic easily as they don't stick to it. Found that the end can equal the face of a mallet if you have to work a firmer spot. It is easy to spin a piece in the plastic to hit from all directions. I pound on a cutting board close to the edge of the counter to avoid having my fingers between the pin and counter top.
so how do you prevent all the juices and water from splashing out the cut seems?
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:10 PM   #37
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Thanks for asking GB,
As it thins out it sticks to the plastic as I learned the first time I did it. On that first time I tried to pull the chicken out of the bag it was so thin it pulled apart. Now I slice the freezer bag open along the seams so I can separate the plastic from the chicken as one would the back of contact paper. Handling by the plastic the chicken can be gently placed either in flour or onto a piece of wax paper for easy further handling.
That makes perfect sense!
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:42 PM   #38
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so how do you prevent all the juices and water from splashing out the cut seems?
Wow you have me on that! Maybe I just haven't had liquidy chicken breasts? The source I have is a local farm. The chickens are free range birds. I place an order for 20 lbs of either breasts or legs and two weeks later they are killed and butcherd and I pickup that afternoon.
Fresh or thawed they are't splashing juices. Hmm the bag does get a little wet but the plastic so extends beyond the meat that it is moistend shut enough that it won't squirt.

Before I found out about the farm I was using breasts from the local Giant supermarket. I am thinking by having them on a plate by the board I just never thought about the juices on the plate being the excess that you maybe asking about.
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Old 04-02-2008, 03:46 PM   #39
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so how do you prevent all the juices and water from splashing out the cut seems?
I think you're still hitting it too hard!!! Lighten up. You don't need to do this to the poor chicken:
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