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Old 07-23-2012, 04:37 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I'm surprised by all the positive comments for Patak's. Blecch! Patak's is the Indian equivalent of hamburger helper or Prego pasta sauce.

Do all of you really find fresh spices to be so much trouble? I cook Indian 2 or 3 times a month. Once you buy your spices, they last quite awhile and are cheaper and vastly better tasting than buying sauce that comes in a jar.
no,not at all steve like most on here i enjoy the prep/real stuff etc that's why i post the pics as well as the finished article.it's just a question of time sometimes.i work from 8am til 7pm 6 days a week during the property "season".i tend to use the pastes rather than the sauces & the pastes are excellent imo.is it the sauces that are "blecch" or the pastes or both?
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:50 PM   #22
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is it the sauces that are "blecch" or the pastes or both?
Sauces mostly. I've bought the pastes before and they're passable in a pinch. But the sauces all have a stale flavor that reminds me of leftovers.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:55 PM   #23
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Sauces mostly. I've bought the pastes before and they're passable in a pinch. But the sauces all have a stale flavor that reminds me of leftovers.
hmmmm,wonder if the stuff you get over there is made under licence elsewhere & not a uk import? i like my food(as you know!) & i've never noticed anything unpleasant like a stale flavour....wouldn't use it if there was.
mystery eh?
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:21 PM   #24
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hmmmm,wonder if the stuff you get over there is made under licence elsewhere & not a uk import? i like my food(as you know!) & i've never noticed anything unpleasant like a stale flavour....wouldn't use it if there was.
mystery eh?
Not a much curry consumed in this country, so it very well could be because they sit on the shelf longer over here.

In any case, the missus and I used to have curry night once a week. I bought a cookbook of 50 curry recipes and made a different recipe from the book every week for a year (well, a couple weeks short of a year I reckon ). There was enough variation in the recipes that we never grew tired of it. I only had to buy about a dozen or so different spices that covered almost every recipe. It's amazing all the different flavors you can get by switching up just a handful of spices.
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Old 07-24-2012, 04:06 AM   #25
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Not a much curry consumed in this country, so it very well could be because they sit on the shelf longer over here.

In any case, the missus and I used to have curry night once a week. I bought a cookbook of 50 curry recipes and made a different recipe from the book every week for a year (well, a couple weeks short of a year I reckon ). There was enough variation in the recipes that we never grew tired of it. I only had to buy about a dozen or so different spices that covered almost every recipe. It's amazing all the different flavors you can get by switching up just a handful of spices.
that's the point i was trying to make earlier in the thread about peppers in jalfrezi.you know as well as i do steve that no indian restaurant in the world has 20-30 minutes to cook a dish unless it is a specialist dish that requires on the ticket prep/cook & service.they have 3 or 4 basic stock "gravies" kept warm on the back burners to which the chef adds the ingredients that make that gravy into the dish ordered.usually in less than 5 mins.
indian food is a wonderfully diverse cuisine with very subtle flavours,it's a shame that some less than good restaurants either colour people's judgement or put them off the food altogether with rip off imitations,same with mexican food too,well,over here it is anyway.
talking about mexican grub i was on holiday in cancun years ago & we hired a jeep & drove down to tulum,chichen itza & xelha to visit the mayan ruins & do some snorkelling @ the lagoon.ate some "proper" mexican food whilst driving around....unbelievable stuff!in one bar/restaurant the owner who was quite rightly proud of his country's cuisine/history told us that one of the mayan rulers(forget which) had 3 meals a day throughout his very long reign & no two dishes were the same.now that is diverse cuisine.reckon he was telling the truth steve? i'd like to think he was
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:49 AM   #26
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Steve,

Thanks for your feedback.

How did your salmon and balsamic floral vinegar turn out ?

Ciao,
Margi.
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:53 AM   #27
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i don't see any peppers in the recipe margi.one of the basic ingredients for a jalfrezi is peppers.sometimes green sometimes red or both.without the peppers what you have is a basic curry.also no indian or pakistani chef(both have their own version of jalfrezi) would use chilli flakes.green finger chillies would be used.
This is a good version H and the chef gives a good reason why its called
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:53 AM   #28
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talking about mexican grub i was on holiday in cancun years ago & we hired a jeep & drove down to tulum,chichen itza & xelha to visit the mayan ruins & do some snorkelling @ the lagoon.ate some "proper" mexican food whilst driving around....unbelievable stuff!in one bar/restaurant the owner who was quite rightly proud of his country's cuisine/history told us that one of the mayan rulers(forget which) had 3 meals a day throughout his very long reign & no two dishes were the same.now that is diverse cuisine.reckon he was telling the truth steve? i'd like to think he was
Wouldn't surprise me a bit, Harry. People sometimes forget that so many ingredients now considered integral to European and Asian cultures originally came from this continent. Mayans had been cooking with tomatoes, chilis, chocolate, corn, and beans for a thousand years before the first European explorers set foot here.

Unless you're in a state that borders it, Most Mexican restaurant food in the US tends to be limited to street food like tacos, enchiladas, tamales, and burritos. But as you found out, there's much more out there.

You've reminded me that I have a couple of Mexican cookbooks that I haven't dug into for awhile.
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:57 AM   #29
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How did your salmon and balsamic floral vinegar turn out ?
Very nice, thank you, Margi. Two of our guests couldn't (or wouldn't) eat fish, so I made an alternate meal of chicken. The balsamic reduction worked just as well for the poultry.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:52 PM   #30
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Bolas,

Thank you for posting your video for viewers of this recipe.

Ciao, Have Nice Tuesday,
Hope that you are feeling better,
Margaux.
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chicken, chicken breast, curry, ethnic, recipe

Chicken: Jalfrezi, Jalfreji, Jalfresi :chef: Buon Giorno, Ladies & Gentlemen, For enthusiasts of curry and the piquant, this aromatic sensational dish is sure to please. Of course, it can be adjusted to your own palate and tolerance for piquantness. *** Photo to follow ... CHICKEN JALFREZI or jalfreji or jalfresi ... Regular olive oil 1 grated large onion 2 minced garlic cloves 750 grams of skinless chicken breasts and/or thighs 3 Teaspoons cúrcuma powder 1 tsp. red cayenne piquant flakes or powder 1 1/2 tsps. salt 500g of ripe red juicy tomatoes 30g clarified butter or 2 tblsps. olive oil 3 tsps. cumin powder 3 tsps. coriander powder 2 tblsps. freshly grated peeled ginger 30g fresh cilantro chopped finely salt and freshly ground rose, green & black peppercorns 1. heat 2 tblps.of oil in deep skillet and sauté the onion and then the garlic until tender. 2. add the chicken pieces of choice ( I only eat the breast meat ), cúrcuma, red cayenne chili pepper, and the salt. Stir and sauté 10 mins. until golden and then, turn over the chicken pieces and sauté until golden. 3. add the tomatoes ( coulis blended peeled and de-seeded ) and cover the skillet and simmer 20 to 25 minutes. 4. then remove lid & continue simmering 10 mins. more for sauce to thicken. 5. then add the clarified butter or oil, the cumin, the coriander, the ginger and the fresh cilantro minced and simmer 7 minutes 6. salt and pepper to taste 7. serve with Basmati Rice and Naan or crusty hot bread of choice +++ serve with Rosé Cava or dry Rosé wine of choice with a drizzle of lime ... Enjoy, Margaux Cintrano 3 stars 1 reviews
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