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Old 08-04-2012, 08:24 AM   #1
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Chicken Parmigiano question

also called Parmigiana di melanzane

I've been trying to make this for some years..

could Y'all Critique my recipe?

1. meat.. I like to use boneless and skinless chicken thighs, pounded thin, with Italian Style Progreso bread crumbs, then fried, and left to rest..

2. Sauce.. I cook for two, so I usually buy a good bottled sauce, just tomato and basil.

3. Cheese..I can get Real Mozzerela, but I don't normally have it here, so I do have sliced Provelone..

then to top I always buy Real Parmessan, though it is in the grocery Isle and I think it comes from Australia..

methode.. stack two cutlets, with sauce and cheese, then top with more sauce and Parma and a few torn Basil Leaves..

This is darn good, but please Wow me with this dish...

Am I missing something here?

Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 08-04-2012, 08:43 AM   #2
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This is my recipe. I always start with plain crumbs and add my own herbs and spices that way I know exactly whats in there and can control the amounts.
I bread, fry, drain, top each cutlet with sauce, grated romano and parmesan cheeses and mozzarella. Then I place under broiler to melt and brown the cheese.
I have never used provolone but if thats what you have give it a try.

Breaded cutlets

Dredge flour: AP flour (or a combo of AP and several other. I use AP, peanut flour, flaxseed meal), sea salt, ground peppercorn blend

Egg wash: Egg, milk (or buttermilk), sea salt, ground peppercorn blend

Crumbs: Panko Unseasoned bread crumbs, Oregano, Garlic powder, Onion powder, Goya Adobo Seasoning, Accent, Sea Salt, Ground peppercorns, Cayenne, Paprika, Thyme, Rosemary, grated romano and parmesan cheeses

(cauliflower pictured below)






Chicken cutlets fried in canola oil (in cast iron pan)



Fried chicken is draining on brown paper bag.


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Old 08-04-2012, 08:51 AM   #3
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"Parmigiana di melanzane" is eggplant parmigana. Pollo is chicken in Italian and pronounced Po lo, it is also the same spelling in Spanish but pronounced Poy yo.

We prefer panko crumbs for the coating. We set up a dredging station and the flour (AP) gets a little salt, pepper and parm. So in the flour first then shaken to remove excess flour, then egg wash and last panko.
Browned in saute pan. Individually sauced in oven proof serving dish, cheesed and finised in the oven at 350F. More cheese on the side.
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Old 08-04-2012, 09:00 AM   #4
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eric, chicken parm is one of my most favourite things to eat. i remember when i was a teenager and i had my wisdom teeth out, my mom happened to make her fantastic chicken parm that night. so undeterred, i put some in a blender with a lot of sauce and some water, and i had a chicken parm shake.

i like your version of the dish. using brown meat chicken and provolone are interesting twists. i've also made it with other meats such as pork (sirloin cutlets), turkey breasts, and veal, of course.

i do it the "classic" italian american way, using boneless chicken breasts that are pounded to an even (roughly 1/2") thickness. the key, imo, is to not pound them too thin or you end up eating as much breading as you do chicken.
you should be able to taste the chicken through everything else going on: breading, sauce, and cheeses.

i pan fry the italian seasoned breaded breasts (progresso is a good brand) in either evoo or grapeseed oil until just golden and barely cooked through, wven a little less.

they are put aside on paper towels, then i spoon a half inch or so thick layer of sauce (again, a simple tomato basil is good) into a deep 13 x 9 glass baking dish. the breaded/fried chicken is placed on top of the sauce with edges overlapping a bit. spoon just a little sauce from the pan on top of the chicken, but the breasts shouldn't be sumberged in sauce.

next, some grated parmesan cheese goes over the chicken, then shredded mozarella is sprinkled generously over top, and the dish is placed in a pre-heated 375 degree oven until the cheese melts and the sauce around the edges is bubbling.

i also like your touch of adding fresh basil at the end. you can do that just before you sprinkle on the cheese, and a final bit for garnish.

ok, that's it. that's how mom made it from how she was taught by all of our italian american neighbors in both brooklyn and jersey.
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Old 08-04-2012, 09:06 AM   #5
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- Thin layer of sauce
- Layer of floured fried cutlets
- Layer of fresh mozzarella
- Sprinkling of grated Parmigiano & Locatelli
- Layer of floured fried cutlets
- Layer of fresh mozzarella
- Layer of sauce
- Heavy sprinkling of grated Parmigiano & Locatelli and red pepper flakes
- Drizzling of olive oil.
In winter, bake in preheated 375F oven for 20 - 30 minutes
In summer, bake in Dutch oven over medium heat for ~30 minutes (after pot cover gets too hot to touch).
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Old 08-04-2012, 09:52 AM   #6
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While living in Italy I was introduced to a dish called Bistecca alla Bolognese. It was a slice of beef fillet served like chicken parm, with the sauce and cheese. But the difference here was they had a layer of pepperoni or salami on top of the meat and under the sauce and cheese. I have taken this and incorporated it into my Chicken Parm recipe. I get some thinly sliced pepperoni, and using the bumpy side of my mallet I pound it into my chicken breast, then continue with the three step breading procedure. It is a nice combination.
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Old 08-04-2012, 01:11 PM   #7
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Giggler,

Since I had not seen your thread until a few minutes ago, what I have planned to mention, had already been mentioned by Rock Lobster and Craig:

Melanzane is Eggplant in English, not Parmigiano ( melted cheese ).

Pollo is chicken in Italian ( po lo ) and Pollo in Spanish is: poi yo in pronounciation ( double L is Yo ).


I also prepare my bistecca like Rock Lobster, with proscuitto di parma ...

All my best for a great summer,
Margaux.
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Old 08-04-2012, 01:26 PM   #8
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Your recipe sounds good, Eric, as does everyone else's!

I use Pioneer Woman's, without the pasta:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/r...ipe/index.html
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Old 08-04-2012, 01:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
also called Parmigiana di melanzane

I've been trying to make this for some years..

could Y'all Critique my recipe?

1. meat.. I like to use boneless and skinless chicken thighs, pounded thin, with Italian Style Progreso bread crumbs, then fried, and left to rest..

2. Sauce.. I cook for two, so I usually buy a good bottled sauce, just tomato and basil.

3. Cheese..I can get Real Mozzerela, but I don't normally have it here, so I do have sliced Provelone..

then to top I always buy Real Parmessan, though it is in the grocery Isle and I think it comes from Australia..

methode.. stack two cutlets, with sauce and cheese, then top with more sauce and Parma and a few torn Basil Leaves..

This is darn good, but please Wow me with this dish...

Am I missing something here?

Eric, Austin Tx.
It's a pretty simplistic dish, but I think you can add more flavor, or try a different approach. Use the freshest ingredients i.e. homemade tomato sauce, or try a tomato vodka sauce. Salt the chicken first, add grated parmesan cheese and/or lemon zest to the crumbs. Cut a pocket and add prosciutto. Try a rollatini-style - add a little tomato sauce or fresh diced tomato, fresh basil & some shredded mozzarella, roll up & secure w/ picks, & dip. Fry or bake. Top w/ more sauce & cheese, if desired.
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:33 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
It's a pretty simplistic dish, but I think you can add more flavor, or try a different approach. Use the freshest ingredients i.e. homemade tomato sauce, or try a tomato vodka sauce. Salt the chicken first, add grated parmesan cheese and/or lemon zest to the crumbs. Cut a pocket and add prosciutto. Try a rollatini-style - add a little tomato sauce or fresh diced tomato, fresh basil & some shredded mozzarella, roll up & secure w/ picks, & dip. Fry or bake. Top w/ more sauce & cheese, if desired.
Stuffed w/ cream cheese, spinach, mozzarella & parmesan cheese:

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