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Old 01-08-2012, 12:41 PM   #1
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Chicken-Soup-with-Ginger-and-Shiitake-Mushrooms

Chicken soup doesn't need to take hours to make. This is a simple, light chicken soup that is richly flavored with shiitake mushrooms, and brightened with fresh ginger and soy sauce.
This recipe is featured on my own site as a thread in the "Recipe Box".

Chicken-Soup-with-Ginger-and-Shiitake-Mushrooms

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Old 01-08-2012, 02:08 PM   #2
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I can't see the recipe. It tells me I'm not logged in.
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:16 PM   #3
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I can't see the recipe. It tells me I'm not logged in.
I'm so sorry, I had forgotten that I have that forum blocked to non-members.

here's the page from where I get the RSS feed for that forum:
Chicken Soup with Ginger and Shiitake Mushrooms Recipe | Simply Recipes
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:20 PM   #4
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Looks yummy, though I will have to leave out the soy (I'm not supposed to eat soy).

It says, "The stock is very light, and comes just from the cooking of the ingredients for less than half an hour." Technically, that's not stock. It is "court bouillon" (French for short boil).
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Old 01-09-2012, 12:50 PM   #5
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I would say the soup would come out better without soy sauce. Soy sauce is great when you make stir-fry, or stew. But in soup - not so great. The soy flavour is too strong and it overwhelms the chicken and shitake's flavours.

And I don't think corn starch marinade is necessary. From this recipe, I think it calls for corn starch for marinade so it helps the chicken to absorb the soy flavour. But again, this is more for stir-fry type dish.

In stir-fry, since you cook quickly over short time, you want to marinade meat in advance so it's more flavourful.

However for soups in Chinese cooking, marinade is uncommon.

You can still make a chicken soup within half an hour as long as you break the chicken into smaller pieces. And using shitake definitely helps.

Besides ginger, you can also pour a tablespoon of cooking wine to the soup to add flavour.
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Old 01-09-2012, 12:56 PM   #6
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I see soy sauce used in other Asian soup recipes along with the use of corn starch to prepare the meat to be used in the soup.

If the soy isn't overdone, it shouldn't overpower the other flavors.
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:13 AM   #7
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I like adding a little lemon grass when I make chicken stock with ginger and shitake mushrooms. Because I use dehydrated mushrooms, I will also add some of the water from rehydrating the mushrooms.
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:31 AM   #8
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I would say the soup would come out better without soy sauce. Soy sauce is great when you make stir-fry, or stew. But in soup - not so great. The soy flavour is too strong and it overwhelms the chicken and shitake's flavours.
With 3 cups of water and a pound and a half of meat, I don't see two tablespoons of soy sauce as being overwhelming in any way. Of course, it all depends on what soy sauce you use. I have a dark, mushroom flavored soy sauce that would be overpowering in as little as one teaspoon of it in that recipe. Two tablespoons of light soy sauce shouldn't hardly even be noticed. There are soy sauces that range from very, very light, (Touchou), all the way to something akin to black mud. Some of the dark soys are outrageous! I've used one that was so thick, it was like paste, and a quarter teaspoon of it would flavor a gallon of broth.

Tuchōu; The light soy sauce made from the first pressing of the soybeans, which can be loosely translated as first soy sauce or referred to as premium light soy sauce. Touchōu is sold at a premium because, like extra virgin olive oil, the flavor of the first pressing is considered superior. Due to its delicate flavour it is used primarily for dipping.
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Old 01-10-2012, 02:32 PM   #9
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With 3 cups of water and a pound and a half of meat, I don't see two tablespoons of soy sauce as being overwhelming in any way. Of course, it all depends on what soy sauce you use. I have a dark, mushroom flavored soy sauce that would be overpowering in as little as one teaspoon of it in that recipe. Two tablespoons of light soy sauce shouldn't hardly even be noticed. There are soy sauces that range from very, very light, (Touchou), all the way to something akin to black mud. Some of the dark soys are outrageous! I've used one that was so thick, it was like paste, and a quarter teaspoon of it would flavor a gallon of broth.

Tuchōu; The light soy sauce made from the first pressing of the soybeans, which can be loosely translated as first soy sauce or referred to as premium light soy sauce. Touchōu is sold at a premium because, like extra virgin olive oil, the flavor of the first pressing is considered superior. Due to its delicate flavour it is used primarily for dipping.
Tim - your comments about soy sauce is very thorough!

I would like to add a few lines about soy sauce.

Light soy sauce, as the name suggests, is lighter in color and milder in taste. However, it is actually more salty than the Dark one.

Light soy sauce is commonly used in stir-fry. It can also be used in dressing or as a dipping sauce as well.

Tuchōu, the "premium soy sauce" from the first pressing, is not necessarily the lightest in flavour. It simply means it comes from the first pressing through fermentation of soybean and wheat flour. It is a good choice for dipping, and equally good for stir-fry.

Other variations of light soy sauce include "Seasoned Soy Sauce for Seafood", which is used in steamed fish; and "Shrimp Soy Sauce", which contains shrimp essence.

Dark (thick) soy sauce is darker and thicker because it contains molasses and sugar. Dark soy sauce is used more commonly for darkening the colour of dish. In fact, Dark soy sauce is not necessarily more salty than the light one.

Dark soy sauce is more commonly found in stew recipe due to its capability of darkening the colour.

As you said, a common variation of Dark soy sauce is the one with shitake mushroom flavour.


Back to the chicken soup recipe, I agree the soy sauce may not overpower others' flavour as long as it's not overused.

But I still say, from my very own experience of cooking chicken soup in the Chinese way for many many years, the soup does not need soy sauce to boost its flavour. It would turn out equally good without it, if not better than with it. The soup's flavour mainly comes from chicken, shitake mushroom, and ginger.
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Old 01-10-2012, 02:42 PM   #10
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I love soy sauce in asian stule soups, love it. It works really well, it add an amazing flavor, of course you have to make sure to use a good soy sauce. Try Lee Kum Kee brand, they have many differen flavor varieties of soy sauce. it is by far one of the best redily available soy sauces on the market.
Thank for this recipe.
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