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Old 11-09-2009, 09:00 AM   #11
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I recomend using dark meat and dark meat bones for stock. Neither white meat or the bones from the same area have much of a flavor. As far as seasonong goes for the stock, I'd use only salt and black pepper.
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Old 11-09-2009, 04:32 PM   #12
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Here is a link to Alton Brown's Chicken Stock recipe. It's fairly standard (although I don't use leeks all of the time - just when I remember to get some, and I crack the peppercorns) and points out a couple of things:

  1. Start with COLD water
  2. Bring it up just to the point the pot is about to boil but NEVER let it reach the boiling point. Any boiling will emulsify the fats and make your stock cloudy and give it greasy mouth feel.
  3. DO skim the scum (coagulated proteins) off the top of the liquid and keep it skimmed off - it will add a funky taste if you don't.
  4. DO NOT EVER add salt to your stock while you are making it - add salt when you make the dish you are using the stock in.
  5. COOL QUICKLY after straining your stock and refrigerate promptly unless you are going to be using the stock immediately.

Yes, use the entire carcass (all of the bones) because the joints contain collagen which is what gives a good stock that unctuous "mouth feel" and jelly quality when it cools, a little meat is okay - do use the wing tips, neck, back, legs, etc.

I've probably left something out - but this is the basic idea.
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Old 11-09-2009, 04:45 PM   #13
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I could go on argue with Alton Brown, but not with Michael , so go ahead and do what he says even though I don't completely agree.
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:19 PM   #14
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Go ahead and discuss what you don't agree with, Charlie! I only used Alton Brown's recipe because it's just about as basic and standard as they get - and I didn't have to dig out one of my books and type all that stuff in.

I didn't mention that I also use the skin and if you are fortunate to get the feet you definitely want to add them to the stock because they are loaded with collagen.
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Old 11-09-2009, 05:33 PM   #15
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I don't really disagree, it just I do some things diferently. Doesn't mean I am right or wrong.
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Old 11-10-2009, 01:15 AM   #16
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How do you get it not to boil?

I tried yesterday with the recipe but it was impossible to not boil it.

Now I have a stock that is greasy and contains to much fat (my gut can not digest to much fat). So I can't use it.
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Old 11-10-2009, 07:32 AM   #17
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Pretty much just the way Alton stated:

Cook on high heat until you begin to see bubbles break through the surface of the liquid. Turn heat down to medium low so that stock maintains low, gentle simmer.

Depending on how high medium low is on your stove you may need to drop down a notch more toward low ...

Also - once you have cooled your stock and refrigerated it overnight the fat will rise to the top and solidify - you can then scoop it out fairly easily.
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Old 11-11-2009, 10:44 AM   #18
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Yeah, what Michael said, and also don't forget that if you are making soup to eat it straight it is different than when you are making stock that you will use for further cooking.
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Old 11-14-2009, 10:27 AM   #19
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A few years back was cleaning out the freezer and came upon a chicken that had to be in there at least 6 mos. or more. I started to throw it out, but decided to make stock out of the bird instead. I let it thaw out in the frig. checked for freezer burn, all ok, removed the enerds. rinsed off the bird and chucked it in my stock pot. threw in one onion sliced in half, 4 sticks of celery course chop , a whole garlic blub cut in half Paper and all and two bay leaves. added enough water to cover plus two inches. Skimmed when needed, shimmered for two - three hours. One thing I forgot mention was during this shimmering process I used my perforated spaghetti strainer to push down on the poor little chicken and crush the little bugger into a pile of bones . This worked very well. I strained the stock through a fine wire strainer and skimmed off the fat. After the gallon of stock started to cool down a little, the stock started to become a solid . I poured the stock in zip lock bags to freeze. The reason for the bags are after the stock freeze I'll use my vacuum sealer for long time storage. This was the best stock I have ever made. What about the poor little flat chicken you ask? Chicken salad sandwiches to die for.
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Old 11-14-2009, 02:34 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
Chicken stock is chicken-vegetable soup with all of the bones and vegetable solids sifted out after it's finished cooking. From beginning to end I make mine in one to two hours. Any longer than that and the flavor begins to go funky. Within the first hour or so the vegetable flavors still taste fresh and the chicken flavor is distinct.
Who can sort out this conundrum for me? I just read something very similar to the above in the "JOY" cookbook; but Alton Brown's recipe says to simmer for 6-8 hours. So who is correct??

Two hours or eight hours???
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