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Old 10-22-2017, 06:51 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
It's the sheet pan. That's what we use, for that and many other things!


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I would make a huge mess with a sheet pan. The rendered fats and vegetable juices would be all over the inside of my oven -- mostly from me trying to remove the pan of cooked food from the oven.

Is there some reason this could not be made in a roasting pan? Something with higher sides than a sheet pan, for those of us who are not particularly graceful?

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Old 10-22-2017, 08:54 PM   #12
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Is there some reason this could not be made in a roasting pan? Something with higher sides than a sheet pan, for those of us who are not particularly graceful?
You can make it in a roasting pan, but what you're missing is that the sheet pan, with the low sides, allows for more evaporation. So there will be less liquid to spill and the food will have more caramelization. It will also cook faster because there's more exposed surface area.
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:01 PM   #13
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Also, there are lots of possibilities other than chicken, which does release a lot of liquid during roasting. Here are some examples: http://www.cookinglight.com/recipe-f...et-pan-dinners
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Old 10-22-2017, 10:36 PM   #14
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But, I'm still trying to understand the browning of the meat and the sweating of the onions part. Is that done in a skillet or is it done on that sheet pan. If on the sheet pan, how?
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Old 10-23-2017, 01:28 AM   #15
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It's easy, taxy - cut things up, toss them together, put them on the sheet pan, stick them in the oven. Wait. Remove - and stuff your face!
I've been sheet-roasting vegetables in the oven for a long time now, and sometimes add in the meat. For cut-up chicken, sometimes the onions will get a little caramelized by the time the chicken is done, but they're good that way. Maybe the edges of some veggies might char, but they're good that way. However, if you don't want crispy broccoli florets by the time the chicken would be done, toss them into the pan part-way through the roasting process. Or you could par-roast the chicken, then add the veggies to the tray.

I do toss my ingredients with a bit of oil before I put them on the tray, but that's what works for me.

Casey, dont' worry, you won't slop. I'm clumsy and I do sheet pan dinners. There really isn't enough juice in the pan to have it spill all over. In fact, IF you would want to make a gravy, you would need to add water or broth to the pan after you take the food off, scrape it up, and pour it into a pan to cook/thicken.
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Old 10-23-2017, 01:31 AM   #16
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Oh, and I don't chop my onions, I slice them into quarters or eighths, depending on the size. I cut them vertically, top to bottom. If you want more char, or more fully cooked onion, you can probably cut the onion in 12 or 16 pieces. I also toss in all the usual veggies: carrots, a bit of celery, etc. All in two-bite pieces.
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Old 10-23-2017, 02:38 AM   #17
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It's easy, taxy - cut things up, toss them together, put them on the sheet pan, stick them in the oven. Wait. Remove - and stuff your face!
I've been sheet-roasting vegetables in the oven for a long time now, and sometimes add in the meat. For cut-up chicken, sometimes the onions will get a little caramelized by the time the chicken is done, but they're good that way. Maybe the edges of some veggies might char, but they're good that way. However, if you don't want crispy broccoli florets by the time the chicken would be done, toss them into the pan part-way through the roasting process. Or you could par-roast the chicken, then add the veggies to the tray.

I do toss my ingredients with a bit of oil before I put them on the tray, but that's what works for me. ...
No, I meant this specific recipe, not sheet roasting in general.
"The method is pretty standard:
sweat off the chopped onions and then add the chicken pieces, ..."

Okay, I guess it doesn't say to brown the chicken, but it does say to sweat the onions and that's usually done in a skillet with some oil or fat. I wouldn't consider it "sweating" if I just threw the onion pieces on a sheet and roasted them.
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Old 10-23-2017, 04:00 AM   #18
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Oops, taxy, I guess I went off track. I guess you'll need to wait for di to answer that question.
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Old 10-23-2017, 08:37 AM   #19
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The way I was taught to do a sheet pan was as follows: have meat like chicken, or something on the bone, cut up into small sizes - about 4"x4", or a little bit larger. Cut the onions into strips vertically so they look like crescent moons, width about 1/4 inch. Cut your potatoes, and other vegetables into sizes suitable to be ready at the same time as everything else. If you'r using toms, don't use toms in juice, just plum tomatoes. Scatter these over the top. If you're going to deglaze with wine, don't use too much, just enough to give a zing to the dish, but nothing to make it sloppy or too liquid, remembering all the time - and I know perfectly well that you all would have got that in one by now. The juices from the meat will ooze out and flavour the rest of the ingredients. If you're going to do a dusting of Parmesan or toasted breadcrumbs, do it just before the end, to allow the cheese to melt and the breadcrumbs a little something crunchy. The shallowness of the tray will keep the level of liquid down. The sheet pan I did was as follows: Chicken, cut into pieces of about the volume of a chicken drumstick, and set out on the pan. Add your seasoning and herbs what you use is for you to decide. It's great to get creative! I added wild mushrooms to my sheet pan because they're now in season, and the liquids seep out. The onions will soften. If you want, you can add a little white wine, but only a drop, so as not to make the bake too liquid with the mushroom juice, but give a nice zing.

That's just about it! I first came across these when I went to Rome for 3 years to the University. All the trattorie did them. Back then, working folk would go to their favourite trattoria for lunch everyday, and I remember the trays of different types of tray bake and how colourful they were. While I remember, oven temperatures: about 80C until you can see that it's done - that's an eyeball job!

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Old 10-24-2017, 07:50 AM   #20
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While I remember, oven temperatures: about 80C until you can see that it's done - that's an eyeball job!
I think you lost a digit. Do you mean 180 C (or 356 F for us Yanks)?
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