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Old 10-23-2007, 11:10 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
I thought I missed something, as well. Didn't see a pic of UB's other than the BBQ. Can someone share a link? TIA
I don't have a particular technique, per se, I just adapted Miss Katie's (Cathy Cox's) recipe to "Campfire" cooking! See pictures at Kalbi? Short Rib? Ever cook them? thread.
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Old 10-23-2007, 11:28 PM   #32
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I have made 40 cloves of chicken and it was wonderful! I even wrapped my casserole dish with foil and then put the lid on to keep all that lovely steam in there. I dotted with butter. The butter, chicken fat and garlic made a wonderful dipper for bread!!!!! Does anyone know why I can't lose any weight?
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Old 10-24-2007, 12:33 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
See pictures at Kalbi? Short Rib? Ever cook them? thread.
Thank you UB.
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Old 10-24-2007, 01:55 AM   #34
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Here is my version of Chicken With 40 cloves of Garlic. It's perfect for this time of year, because most of us still have fresh herbs, but there is (or should be!) a bit of chill in the air.

(Caveat: it's okay for me to post this recipe from my book, I hold the copyright.)

Provençal Chicken in the Pot

The French would call this dish "Le Plat Unique," because it is a whole meal in one pot. Although its execution is realistic for a twelve-year-old, the results are impressive enough for even your most discriminating guests. And, to top it off, it's incredibly low in fat because the chicken steams atop the garlic, herbs and liquid.

makes 4 to 6+ servings -- depends on what else you're serving, and how hungry your guests are

1 4-pound frying chicken
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Bouquet garni (include thyme, parsley stems, rosemary, marjoram, bay leaf)
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
40 unpeeled cloves of garlic
Bed of fresh herbs for the pot (should include: 1 bay leaf, the leafy top of a whole bunch of celery, a whole bunch of flat-leaf parsley, several sprigs each of marjoram, rosemary, sage and thyme -- and summer savory and lavender greens, if you can find them)
1 cup dry white wine
12 small all-purpose potatoes (about the size of a silver dollar)
12 - 16 small white onions
4 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
1 pound fresh peas, shelled (or 1 10-ounce package frozen)
2 tablespoons flour and 1 tablespoon water paste to seal the lid
Crôutes for serving

1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Make a mixture of salt and pepper in a small bowl. Use this to generously season the interior and exterior of a 4-pound fryer. Tie a bouquet garni together with string and put it inside.
2. Pour 1 cup of olive oil into a large (about 9 quarts) Dutch oven with a lid. Add the bed of herbs and all of the garlic.
3. Set the prepared chicken on this bed and turn it over and over in the already perfumed oil. Add the dry white wine. Scatter the vegetables around on top of the bed of herbs.
4. Then with all the oil, wine and aromatics below and the chicken and vegetables on top, put the lid on and seal it “hermetically” with a band of flour and water paste. Bake 1 hour and 30 minutes in the preheated oven.
5. Remove from oven and allow the Dutch oven to sit undisturbed for 15 to 20 minutes. Do not lift the lid!
6. In preparation for serving, put a small serving bowl (for the garlic) and a slotted spoon on the table. A pair of poultry shears is the easiest tool to use for cutting the hot chicken into serving pieces. A sturdy wooden spoon will help you hold the chicken still for cutting without burning your fingers.
7. Carry the Dutch oven to the table and lift off the lid at the moment of serving, and take a deep breath. The aroma is incredible!
8. Serve with toasted slices of bread, which each diner will spread with the incomparable garlic purée. Don't be surprised. The chicken will not be browned.

Teacher’s Tip: When you have eaten all the chicken, vegetables and garlic, you will find yourself with a large pot of herbs and a chickeny, garlicky wine-flavored stock. You can make a wonderful soup the next day (or several days hence) using this as a base. Here's how:

Provençal Herbed Bean and Pasta Soup
1. Remove the herbs and discard them. Pour the wine/olive oil stock into a storage container, cover tightly and refrigerate overnight. When you are ready to make the soup, remove most of the oil that has risen to the top. Also overnight, soak 1 pound of small white beans in enough cold water to cover by 2 inches. The next day, drain the beans and put them back in the pot with enough water to cover by 2 inches, 6 black peppercorns and 1 bay leaf. Bring the beans to a boil and simmer for about 1 hour, until the beans are not quite tender. Drain the beans and reserve the water.
2. Return the beans to the pot and now add the reserved wine/olive oil stock from the chicken to the beans. Also add several fresh sprigs of the same herbs you used in last night's pot, and at least five of the following:
1/2 pound lima beans or fava beans, shelled and peeled
6 potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1/2 pound green beans, ends trimmed
5 carrots, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch chunks
5 red onions, peeled and thickly sliced
5 zucchini, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
3 white turnips, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 leeks, well washed, dried and sliced

Teacher’s Tip: The more of the above ingredients you add to your soup, the more delicious it will be.
3. Add 1 teaspoon sea salt and stir the mixture. Bring the soup to a boil and simmer for 40 to 50 minutes more. Some tubular pasta added during the last 15 minutes of cooking will add substance to this second one-dish meal. Serve the soup in large bowls with freshly grated Parmesan cheese on top and crusty bread on the side.
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Old 10-24-2007, 02:01 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
K

Katie's recpie is not posted that I can find, neither is Bob's technique (other than that killer outdoor BBQ).

My point is that the utilization of a "huge" amont of garlic is a pretty common technique and is adaptable to a variety of ingredients and cooking techniques.
They've been doing it in France for hundreds of years!
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Old 10-24-2007, 08:40 AM   #36
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I cook well-seasoned chicken with 2 heads of garlic (peeled), carrots, potatoes, onions, leeks, white wine, chix broth. No recipe really. Just brown the chix and put everything into a dutch oven or large saute pan or other appropriate cooking vessel.

I did this before i heard about the 40 cloves recipe. Seriously. Cooking garlic like this mellows it considerably.

The idea of using a relatively lot of garlic (like a head rather than a clove or two) is a technique used in lots of recipes from difft. cultures. Garlic-loving cultures!
Miss Jenny....

Are you calliing for a "cut up" chicken or a whole bird? I'm guessing cut up per your suggestion of a large saute pan. With your recipe and Miss June's
recipe, my mind is spinning to Uncle Bob's Outdoor Kitchen adaptations.
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Old 10-24-2007, 12:08 PM   #37
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Oh boy, am I late on this thread.

I make this using leg-and-thigh quarters, cut apart. I brown them in a pan, then bake them in a big turkey-roaster with the garlic cloves, and sprinkle thyme, rosemary, salt, and pepper over the top. When it's done, I usually remove the garlic cloves, and mash them for roasted garlic mashers. The drippings get poured off into a pan so I can caramelize them to a deep nut-brown, then deglaze with a good homemade chicken stock for an absolutely amazing gravy.

Whenever I make this, it DISSAPPEARS! My kids go nuts on it.

Great. Now I'm going to have to make this soon.
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Old 10-24-2007, 12:13 PM   #38
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The drippings get poured off into a pan so I can caramelize them to a deep nut-brown, then deglaze with a good homemade chicken stock for an absolutely amazing gravy.
That sounds so good AllenOK. Can you indulge a beginner and tell me how you caramelize the drippings? I know how to deglaze but do you add anything to caramelize or just brown the drippings up in a pan?
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Old 10-24-2007, 04:15 PM   #39
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I wonder, do you serve the veggies that are cooked with the chicken? What sides do you use? I'd love to make this for friends sometime soon.
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Old 10-24-2007, 04:27 PM   #40
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I like this one. The fewer fresher ingredients the better

Alton's Version
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