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Old 08-30-2016, 04:32 PM   #11
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have a good time and enjoy!
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Old 09-01-2016, 12:39 PM   #12
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We use precooked chicken from the store when we do coronation chicken, my Scottish father in law gave me the recipe he uses and it very basic, does have mango chutney in it and no lemon juice ( due do my allergies) and it really yummy.
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Old 09-01-2016, 05:03 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Hi, BML. I've never heard of Coronation Chicken until you brought it up, but among other choices I found a recipe on the New York Times. I find their recipes to be clearly explained and easy to follow, so you might want to add this version to the recipes you are considering. Good luck with the event, and if you remember, tell us how it all turned out.

Coronation Chicken Salad
Can't get any clearer instructions than this recipe. Good find CG.
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:00 PM   #14
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Coronation was 'designed' (!) to provide a third course of one of the coronation banquets of Queen Elizabeth II, where etiquette required a cold third course, which in those days, not only at Buckingham Palace's state banquets but also the banquets of the upper aristocracy on State occasions. It had to be poultry. The first course would be soup in the French style - and, back then, the chefs would all have trained at the Cordon Bleu School of Cookery in Paris - so the menu would have been designed to conform with the formalities of the time - then fish, then poultry, not game, then two main courses, red meat or fish like turbot, followed by English strawberries, which have a wonderful taste. Etiquette required, then as it is today, something that the majority of guests were happy and yet suitable for an occasion of high state like the coronation of the queen of the Commonwealth countries. Of course, these things of State are slightly less formal these, but back then, Coronation Chicken was an amazingly impressive surprise - who would have seen the Queen eating curry back then! I think it went quickly out of fashion because of the pale imitations and cheap versions that suddenly appeared, first because the British weren't used to that kind, and secondly because the cheap versions didn't taste very good! Any way, here is the recipe:

2 young roasting chickens, poached in homemade stock
1 bouquet garni
salt and pepper
Cream of curry sauce:

1 tbs canola
20z onion finely chopped
1 dessertful curry powder, like the one you used to get
1 tsp tomato puree
1 wineglass dry red wine
3/4 glass water
1 bay leaf
salt, sugar, pepper to taste
lemon juice to taste (fresh)
1 - apricot purče
34 pint mayonnaise (Helmann's is perfect)
2-3 lightly whipped cream
A little extra cream
Cook the chicken, take the meat off the bones and shred
Make up the sauce in the order of the ingredients, but heat the curry powder in hot oil first. Check everything for taste as you go. Combine the chicken with the sauce. Serve on a bed of lettuce leaves.

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Old 09-02-2016, 01:35 AM   #15
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OK, maybe this is a dumb question, but in every recipe here, it's called for a small amount of "tomato puree". What exactly is that in "American English"?

Is it tomato paste like in the tube or can, or maybe tomato sauce? What the heck is "tomato puree"?
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:57 AM   #16
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It is tomato paste, it is a much thicker more condensed form of tomatoes then tomato sauce.

I have learned a lot of difference between UK and USA cooking terms by using the wrong things.
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Old 09-02-2016, 03:43 AM   #17
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Also described as 'tomato concentrate', and it comes in tubes, like 'tomato paste paste'. I sent what the recipe said, but going back to those days, it would have actually been 'tomato paste', and a little goes a long way. You're quite right, though, it's easy to trip up over terms!

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Old 09-02-2016, 11:33 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by BML View Post
Probably against my better judgement I have agreed to a Birthday Bash in the form of a Buffett and one of the dishes I suggested is Coronation chicken. As the event will be in October we thought it best to spread it over two days and there will be about twenty people each day.

I need answers to the following questions as I have never cooked this:
Do I buy a couple of chickens, cook them and pull them to bits or what?
Is it possible to actually buy coronation chicken already made up and if so from where?
There are so many recipes on the internet could any one offer a nice one?
Many thanks.
I've been making coronation chicken for years. It was originally made for a "do" to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II's coronation by (NOT as frequently stated, for the actual coronation feast) by Constance Spry and Rosemary Hume, principals of the Cordon Bleu Cookery School in London

It's simple to make. Personally I'd buy whole chickens and cook them myself (you could buy ready cooked chicken but it's more expensive and you'd have to be sure of the quality). Some recipes demand the breast only but as it is coated in a curry sauce it's unlikely that anyone would notice the presence of meat from the rest of the bird. Ideally the chicken is poached but if you prefer you could roast it.

OK - The recipe. I can't find my recipe as the books are still in store but this is as near as ******. I don't think I use tomato puree but it's up to you.

INGREDIENTS


SERVINGS 8 UNITS US
4 cooked chicken breasts (Cooked and cut into bite-sized chunks)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon curry powder
1⁄4 pint chicken stock
1 teaspoon tomato puree
1⁄2 lemon, juice of (I think I use lime juice - fresh of course - and the zest goes into the mayo mixture)
2 tablespoons mango chutney (or Apricot Jam)
1⁄2 pint mayonnaise
3 tablespoons double cream (Thick)

*** (called tomato paste in the US, I think. It's a concentrated form of cooked tomatoes with (sometimes) salt. NOT canned tomatoes or passata which are too wet)***

DIRECTIONS

Heat oil in saucepan, add the chopped onion, cover and saute gently for 5 minutes until the onion is soft but not brown.

Stir in the curry powder and cook for another two minutes, this will help bring out the flavour.

Add the stock, tomato puree, lemon juice and chutney.

Stir until bubbling, then cook for 5 minutes and the mixture reduces and thickens.

Allow to cool completely, then stir in the mayonnaise and cream.

Add chicken (which should be cut into reasonable sized chunks not "shredded") and mix throughly.

Keep chilled until ready to put out on the buffet table for service.


Enjoy.

Coronation chicken can be very nasty when you buy it in a pot for making sandwiches but home-made with care it is very good.

Bon Appetit!
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Old 09-02-2016, 11:41 AM   #19
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NB Di Reston's versions uses red wine which I wouldn't recommend as it will discolour the sauce. If using wine use white.
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Old 09-02-2016, 11:55 AM   #20
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My submission is the version I found (I'm afraid I'm not very good at putting text on the computer). I have to say, that the red wine was in the recipe I found, and I thought it seemed a bit strange. Would you actually put in white wine, or would you change a thing or to to make the recipe more appealing?

Do let me know how you get along with it, what you did, and how it worked. I'd be interested to know. An Italian would put a recipe like that in the trash bin!

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