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Old 10-03-2010, 07:07 PM   #11
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I put my oven to 400 degrees and when i put the bird in, I changed my mind and put it to 450 degrees and put the timer for 20 minutes. Than I turned it down to 350. it actually took awhile for the oven to come back down, which was strange because i could of sworn in the past it happened quite quickly.

when i decided to take it's temperature - it appeared as if it was well done, but after taking it out and letting it rest - it wasn't well done at all. actually some red spots here and there and the closer to the bone, the redder it was. luckily a lot of it was done enough to eat. I used two different thermometers too and they both soared to at least 170/180

it came out nice and juicy though. i basically put apple slices and garlic in the cavity and did salt, pepper and melted butter all over. i put it on a rack and on the bottom of the rack i put carrots and onions and I also CUt the two wings off the chicken and put that down on the bottom of the pan. I put maybe a 1/4 cup of water in with the veggies.

i think my biggest problem was the gravy. i didn't have much juices down on the bottom at the end and it was all just bits and pieces plus the veggies. I took all the big pieces and charred bits out. I put the pan on the oven and added flour. 2 tablespoons. cooked a little and than cup and 1/2 of chicken stock that I had in my refrigerator. whisked and cooked. very tasty. but it was more like pan juices and very thin. Served with mashed potatoes fresh and some left over butternut squash soup.
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:15 AM   #12
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When cooking to 170-180 degrees there will be some redness near the bone, those won't go away until the bird has stayed at that temp for a while or cooked to around 200, by then the bird is way over cooked. As long as the temp is right (and make sure that your thermometer is correct) and the juices run clear, you will be OK.
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Old 10-04-2010, 07:35 AM   #13
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I use lil chicken broth in the bottom add in celery, carrots, onion, a clove or 2 of garlic, I put few peices of butter under the skin salt and pepper lil thyme. I cover to start with, last 1/2 under cover and bast , comes out very moist, crispy golden skin. and flavored juices for gravy. mmm Our local market has Whole chicken on sale for 79 cent a lb - think I better go get a few. This made me hungry for one
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Old 10-05-2010, 05:48 AM   #14
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I do not cover a chicken, and I want a bit of a browned sauce, so do not put water in the pot (as some have mentioned, if you put water in the bottom, you're braising, not roasting). As for basting, I keep a cruet of olive oil or stick of butter near by, and if it looks dry, I brush or just take the stick of butter and run it over the breast. I also stick a pierced lemon, branch of thyme when in season, and head of garlic in the cavity.
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Old 10-05-2010, 10:09 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4meandthem View Post
No cover-No water here.
That wouldn't be "Roast chicken." but I often baste the chicken while roasting. Not too often, but the white wine I usually use (or dry vermouth) mixes with the juices that emanate from the bird tomake "pan juices" that make a great sauce or gravy later.

If I am doing roast vegetables also, they go on a sheet pan on the shelf under the chicken for the last 25 minutes, after I turn the heat up to 400.
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Old 10-22-2010, 02:09 PM   #16
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My mom taught me to always cover a chicken when roasting, she used tin foil folded over the roaster pan. It holds the heat in around a smaller space encasing the chicken. Add butter pats on top of chicken, (or margarine), and a little salt. Baste chicken with melted butter from pan every 20 minutes or so. You will have to pull back the tin foil to baste. Recover and roast at 350 degrees. She never used a rack, I don't think they had them back then! Uncover approx. 1/2 hour before done to brown the top. A standard size chicken should roast in 1 1/2 hours, if not stuffed. If stuffed, roast for at least 2 hours or more. If your chicken comes out cooked and browned without covering, then you are doing it right. There's no right and wrong, as long as it's cooked through and is browned. Good luck!

Quote:
Originally Posted by legend_018 View Post
I never use a cover when roasting a whole chicken. I usually use a rack though.

1. do people actually use a cover when roasting a whole chicken in the oven? Just curious. if so - is there an advantage to putting a cover on?

Secondary questions are:

1. do you baste? and

2. Do you put any water on the bottom of the pan and keep on replenishing with water as it's cooking?
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Old 10-22-2010, 03:08 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune View Post
That wouldn't be "Roast chicken." but I often baste the chicken while roasting. Not too often, but the white wine I usually use (or dry vermouth) mixes with the juices that emanate from the bird tomake "pan juices" that make a great sauce or gravy later.

If I am doing roast vegetables also, they go on a sheet pan on the shelf under the chicken for the last 25 minutes, after I turn the heat up to 400.
Why not?

Roasting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think your method is closer to braise

Braising - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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