"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-03-2009, 07:32 PM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Missouri
Posts: 588
Yeah... I couldn't find one smaller than this one. It's 5 lbs... So might take 2 hours then...
__________________

__________________
DietitianInTraining is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2009, 07:33 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
Big chickens roast up nicely! And you can carve the breasts like a turkey.
__________________

__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2009, 07:38 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
Here's a similar recipe that my family likes a lot. I modified and expanded on the instructions to make it easier for my daughter, who isn't all that experienced in the kitchen. It may give you a few useful hints and ideas.

ROSEMARY ROAST CHICKEN WITH
ONION-GARLIC GRAVY

1 whole chicken (about 3½ pounds)
1½ tablespoons olive oil
4 medium onions, cut in large chunks (3 really large onions will do)
1 lemon, cut in quarters, seeds removed
2 fresh rosemary sprigs (about 6 inches each)
8 whole garlic cloves, peeled
1½ cups chicken broth (unsalted canned is fine)
Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees (yes, I mean 450).

Remove and discard the giblets, rinse the chicken, pat dry and remove excess fat from around the tail area.

Rub the chicken inside and out with ½ tablespoon of the olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper inside and out.

Stuff the cavity with about ½ to 1 of the chopped onions, 2 wedges of lemon, a sprig of rosemary, and 4 garlic cloves; close cavity with toothpicks to keep veggies inside.

Use a bit of the remaining olive oil to grease the bottom of a glass baking dish. Place the remaining onions and garlic in the dish. Drizzle the remaining oil over the onions.

Place the bird breast down on the onion mixture; squeeze juice of another quarter of the lemon over the chicken.

Roast for about 20 minutes per pound. Check the onion mixture; if it starts to blacken or stick, add a bit of the chicken broth.

After 30 minutes, turn the chicken breast side up and add ¼ to ½ cup chicken broth to the onion mixture.

Return pan to the oven and roast until the meat in the thickest part of the leg just loses its pinkness. Add a bit more of the chicken broth if onions start to dry out.

Remove the chicken to a platter.

Scrape the onion mixture into a medium sauce pan. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add the leaves from the remaining rosemary (discard stem) to taste. Squeeze in the juice of the remaining lemon quarter. Puree with a hand blender, adding remaining broth if the gravy is too thick. Bring pureed mixture to a boil to meld flavors.

Cut the chicken in serving pieces and serve with the gravy.

(NOTE: if you don’t have a hand blender, which is also called a wand or immersion blender, put onion mixture and other ingredients in a food processor or regular blender, puree, then transfer to sauce pan.)
__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2009, 07:42 PM   #14
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Missouri
Posts: 588
Wow Scotch, that sounds good.. I will have to try that sometime. Hopefully this one wont be a disaster! It's smelling good though..
__________________
DietitianInTraining is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2009, 07:53 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
Quote:
Originally Posted by beginner_chef View Post
Wow Scotch, that sounds good.. I will have to try that sometime. Hopefully this one wont be a disaster! It's smelling good though..
To tell you the truth, unless you overcook it, you really can't screw up a roast chicken too much.

In his truly great cookbook, Glorious French Food, James Peterson says that when he's feeling lazy or rushed and doesn't want to make a big to-do in the kitchen, "I roast a chicken, my equivalent of a TV dinner." He "puts the chicken in a 450 degree oven for 50 minutes until the skin's crispy and brown and the juices that accumulate in the cavity are no longer pink, and I serve and eat."

I see that he does put a foil tent on the great for the first 20 minutes, but I don't think that essential if you're using a temperature of 400.
__________________

__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.