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Old 11-15-2009, 04:54 PM   #1
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Crushed Turkey?

Hi folks

I'm new here. I used to cook quite a bit (strictly home cooking). More recently, I've got out of the habit, but want to get back into it.

Last year a friend and I were travelling in the USA (I'm from the UK), and stayed briefly in San Francisco with some folks at Thanksgiving. They cooked a turkey in a very unusual way, and it was far and away the most juicy, tender, succulent turkey we've ever had. Now I want to cook it myself, but I can't get hold of these folks to get the recipe from them.

The key to this recipe was that the turkey had somehow been split (I suppose either breast bone or spine was cut or sawn, I don't recall) so that the whole bird could be opened up and pressed out flat. With the turkey spread flat like this, it required far less roasting time - I think about one third of the normal time. This seemed to be the reason why it was so tender and moist.

Has anyone heard of this technique, and can they tell me the method in detail? I have been volunteered to do the cooking for a Thanksgiving for 6 or 8 people in two weeks time, by way of remembering our travels and our excellent American hosts, so I really want to get this right!

mlg

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Old 11-15-2009, 05:08 PM   #2
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sounds like "spatchcock"

a google will get you lots of info / tips / instructions on "how to"
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Old 11-15-2009, 05:13 PM   #3
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Sounds like a spatchcocked to me to... You cut the back bone out of the turkey. Press on the breast until it's flat.

Munky.
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Old 11-15-2009, 05:30 PM   #4
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Bingo! I'd heard the term 'spatchcock', but never knew what it meant.

Thanks Dillbert.

mlg
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Old 11-15-2009, 05:31 PM   #5
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... and thanks Munky.
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:43 PM   #6
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I'm making a spatchcocked turkey this year. I Googled it and found lots of info. I'm going with Martha Stewart's version. I'm getting a 12 to 14 pound bird and from what I've read, it should take less than two hours to cook.
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Old 11-25-2009, 06:19 PM   #7
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I'd be most interested in hearing about your results and technique after you have the Turkey. I hope you will share!
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Old 11-26-2009, 09:45 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by jkgourmet View Post
I'd be most interested in hearing about your results and technique after you have the Turkey. I hope you will share!

I bought a 12 pound fresh free range turkey, turned it breast side down and with kitchen shears, removed the backbone. Turned it over and pressed down to break the breastbone so the turkey would lay flat. Brushed it all over with melted butter and then added salt and pepper.

Roasted it in a cookie sheet with a 1" lip at 375 degrees. Checked it after an hour and it was already up to 155 degrees in the thigh. I let it go for another 20 minutes and then pulled it out of the oven and covered it with foil for the 20 minute rest. It came out perfect. Crispy skin, juicy and tender breast meat. I'm sold on this technique. Cooking it this way cut the cooking time in half.
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Old 11-27-2009, 02:14 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sedagive View Post
I bought a 12 pound fresh free range turkey, turned it breast side down and with kitchen shears, removed the backbone. Turned it over and pressed down to break the breastbone so the turkey would lay flat. Brushed it all over with melted butter and then added salt and pepper.

Roasted it in a cookie sheet with a 1" lip at 375 degrees. Checked it after an hour and it was already up to 155 degrees in the thigh. I let it go for another 20 minutes and then pulled it out of the oven and covered it with foil for the 20 minute rest. It came out perfect. Crispy skin, juicy and tender breast meat. I'm sold on this technique. Cooking it this way cut the cooking time in half.

I'm sold on the idea now to! Glad you didn't have to fuss with a turkey all day.

Around here traditional turkey whole, is what makes everyone happy. That's what we had last night. But the more I think about it would seem to me on non holidays that's the way to cut the time and hassle of making one. Carving it up must have been a sweet deal to! :)

Munky.
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Old 11-27-2009, 02:42 PM   #10
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Wow! I never heard of the term or technique for butterflying fowl before. Spatchcock. I had to do the research. I found a great UTube video that shows how to prepare a whole chicken in this manner. It is so quick and easy. If it can be done with turkey as easily, it has opened up a whole new prep technique for me. Thanks guys. Even an old dog like me learns new things in hear every now and again. Check this out.



I've got a whole chicken in the freezer that is calling my name. But first, I think I need to eat up teh left-over turkey.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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