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Old 01-26-2016, 03:19 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
My understanding is that the "colada" refers to the coconut in the drink. "Piņa" is the pineapple.

I'm not a coffee drinker so I can't comment on that, but I love a frozen piņa colada on a hot summer day.
Coconut is coco in spanish. Since it doesn't refer to laundry my wild guess is that it is the past tense adjective of cola or tail. You could translate it loosely as pineapple with a tail, the tail being the rum.
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Old 01-26-2016, 03:28 PM   #32
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Colada might be a South Florida thing. It refers to coffee for a group. As Craig wrote, you get a big styro cup and several little "pill" cups. Super sweet. Google "cuban coffee colada" if you are interested in reading more.

I made the mistake of using it to make Irish/Cuban coffee once, had three 8-ounce cups (half coffee, half whisky, whipped cream, couple spoonfuls of sugar). Got about 3 hours sleep in 2 days when I finally started to come down.

The term has absolutely nothing to do with the drink pina colada.
I think it probably is a Florida thing and I've never lived there. I never heard the term in Cuba. I did look it up and it was described as a "shot" of coffee. I can't guess the source of the etymology. If it means coffee with a tail then it might well be about the same thing as pina colada. I brew some stuff called cafe Bustelo that I buy from the cuban market web site. I brew it with a small electric steam espresso machine and it certainly does pack a punch.
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Old 01-26-2016, 07:58 PM   #33
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I think it probably is a Florida thing and I've never lived there. I never heard the term in Cuba. I did look it up and it was described as a "shot" of coffee. I can't guess the source of the etymology. If it means coffee with a tail then it might well be about the same thing as pina colada. I brew some stuff called cafe Bustelo that I buy from the cuban market web site. I brew it with a small electric steam espresso machine and it certainly does pack a punch.
Again, IT HAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with pina colada. It is Cuban coffee served in a large styro cup, with a bunch of little "pill" cups for individual servings. I have my doubts about you looking it up since you keep comparing it to pina colada. Cuban coffee 101 | miami.com , 1 of many. Colada itself has no liquor in it and has absolutely nothing to do with a pina colada. It is an espresso grind dark black/brown coffee with lots and lots of sugar added after brewing. It is served in Little Havana and Cuban places to eat all day long. You use it to make cafe con leche, which is how I was first exposed to it with cuban bread for breakfast and/or churros for dessert.

We do live in South Florida in case you didn't notice, Craig all but a few years of his whole life and I have lived here 40+ years and was married to a Cuban man for several years. We have both worked and lived with Cubans and been greatly exposed to the culture. We are quite aware of the difference between colada and pina colada and they have ABSOLUTELY NOTHING in common.
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Old 01-27-2016, 02:43 AM   #34
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Again, IT HAS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with pina colada. It is Cuban coffee served in a large styro cup, with a bunch of little "pill" cups for individual servings. I have my doubts about you looking it up since you keep comparing it to pina colada. Cuban coffee 101 | miami.com , 1 of many. Colada itself has no liquor in it and has absolutely nothing to do with a pina colada. It is an espresso grind dark black/brown coffee with lots and lots of sugar added after brewing. It is served in Little Havana and Cuban places to eat all day long. You use it to make cafe con leche, which is how I was first exposed to it with cuban bread for breakfast and/or churros for dessert.

We do live in South Florida in case you didn't notice, Craig all but a few years of his whole life and I have lived here 40+ years and was married to a Cuban man for several years. We have both worked and lived with Cubans and been greatly exposed to the culture. We are quite aware of the difference between colada and pina colada and they have ABSOLUTELY NOTHING in common.
I don't think anybody ever said that they did. It certainly isn't worth getting excited over. It wouldn't be the first time that a word was coined or borrowed for a cocktail that had little or nothing to do with any dictionary meanings.

According to Merriam-Webster, in Spanish pina colada means literally, "strained pineapple" (the term dates from about 1920). If colada does mean "strained" then maybe it has something do with how the coffee is brewed? (as I said above, I don't do coffee of any kind, so I'm just throwing that up for discussion)

Addition: I just plugged "colada" in to a Spanish translator and it came up as "wash" in English.
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Old 01-27-2016, 05:47 AM   #35
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I don't think anybody ever said that they did. It certainly isn't worth getting excited over. It wouldn't be the first time that a word was coined or borrowed for a cocktail that had little or nothing to do with any dictionary meanings.

According to Merriam-Webster, in Spanish pina colada means literally, "strained pineapple" (the term dates from about 1920). If colada does mean "strained" then maybe it has something do with how the coffee is brewed? (as I said above, I don't do coffee of any kind, so I'm just throwing that up for discussion)

Addition: I just plugged "colada" in to a Spanish translator and it came up as "wash" in English.
RP, I wasn't addressing my post to you. It was addressed to the FMW post directly above where this was written.

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If it means coffee with a tail then it might well be about the same thing as pina colada.
I wrote in an earlier post that colada has absolutely nothing to do with pina colada (and provided documentation) and I'm not sure why FMW continues to write that it may.

You are more than likely right about it having to do with the brewing method. Before all the fancy machines came out it was brewed in something like this, obviously not an electric one but it's got the best blow-out diagram. 6-Cup Electric Cuban Coffee Maker with Free Cafe La Llave 10 Oz Pack | Coffee Consumers
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Old 01-27-2016, 05:51 AM   #36
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RP, I wasn't addressing my post to you. It was addressed to the FMW post directly above where this was written.
For some reason I haven't been able to edit posts for the last several days, even immediately after making them. So, wanted to add to above: Sorry if you thought it was.
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Old 01-27-2016, 07:02 AM   #37
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RP, I wasn't addressing my post to you. It was addressed to the FMW post directly above where this was written.



I wrote in an earlier post that colada has absolutely nothing to do with pina colada (and provided documentation) and I'm not sure why FMW continues to write that it may.

You are more than likely right about it having to do with the brewing method. Before all the fancy machines came out it was brewed in something like this, obviously not an electric one but it's got the best blow-out diagram. 6-Cup Electric Cuban Coffee Maker with Free Cafe La Llave 10 Oz Pack | Coffee Consumers
I didn't say it had anything to do with pina colada. I was referring to the term colada which doesn't fit with either product. Colada as a noun refers to doing laundry. It is the spanish word for laundry (Not the business but the task). The word cola as a noun is a tail in Spanish. Colada would be the past tense adjective translated as "tailed" or having a tail. I was simply trying add to the conversation. Sorry to have confused you.

I have two of those stovetop makers. I prefer the electric espresso maker.
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chicken, recipe, rice

Cuban Arroz con Pollo (rice with chicken) I was raised in Cuba as a child and have always enjoyed my grandmother's traditional arroz con pollo. The recipe is in my head and normally done by feel but I'll do my best to nail it down here. The Spanish or Latino triad is called sofrito and is composed of onion, bell pepper (or pimiento) and garlic. You will see it used in many Latino dishes including this one. Ingredients 1 cup long grain rice 2 chicken breasts 2 cups chicken stock 1 healthy pinch of Spanish or Iranian saffron 1 onion, chopped 1 green bell pepper, roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed or minced salt and pepper to taste olive oil Start by preparing the saffron. Put the saffron threads into a small ramekin or cup and add just enough water to cover it. Saffron releases its color and flavor in water, not in oil so you want to steep it a little. The result will be red threads in bright yellow water. put a glug of olive oil in a large sauce pan and heat it. Add the chopped onions, pepper and half the garlic and cook for a minute. Then add the rice. Cook for a couple of minutes to allow the rice to pick up the flavors. Add the stock, cover the pan and bring it to a near boil. Turn it down to a simmer and set the timer for 20 minutes. Cut the chicken breasts into thin slices or a large dice as you prefer. Brown the chicken in a hot skillet with some olive oil, salt, pepper and th other half of the garlic. This should take less than 5 minutes. Now add the chicken and saffron (threads and water) to the pot and stir it up well. Recover the pot and smack your lips as you wait for the rice to finish its 20 minute cook time. The rice should have a strong yellow color when done. I usually serve it with fried plantain and Cuban (espresso) coffee. You can also prepare it without the chicken and it becomes a popular side dish called arroz cubano. I've seen it prepared like risotto but in my experience that tends to overcook the chicken. Hope you enjoy it. 3 stars 1 reviews
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