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Old 01-28-2008, 11:31 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by black chef View Post
i've had the best marsala results using the lombardi (sweet), but the florio is good.

my favorite italian restaurant here in town uses versasi sweet marsala.

btw, i've also cooked the marsala with cream... i find it actually takes AWAY from the marsala flavor, and i believe that is what you want.
why would you use Marsala if you didn't want the flavor of it??????

Lemon juice and capers with your veal/chicken makes Piccata. I wouldn't use either with Marsala!

So here's my recipe for Veal Marsala. Sometimes I sautť mushrooms in butter before I start with the veal, because they take longer to cook than the veal does. (Talk about memories of my Dad! )

Veal Scaloppine with Marsala

I learned to make this dish early in life. Itís one of my dadís two or three favorite things to eat! When you make it, youíll understand why. The major caveat here is that milk-fed veal is a very important ingredient in the success Ė and flavor Ė of this dish. Make sure thatís what you use!

makes 6 servings

5 tablespoons olive oil (plus 2 more, if necessary)
3/4 cup unbleached flour
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
5 to 6 twists freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds veal scaloppine, (6 scallops) very thinly sliced and pounded flat
1/2 cup dry Marsala wine
3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1. Heat the oil over medium high heat in a heavy skillet.
2. Mix salt and pepper with the flour and spread it on waxed paper, or a flat plate. Dip the veal in flour, coating each piece on both sides, and shaking off any excess. Put the scaloppine into the hot fat, and brown them quickly on both sides. It should take less than a minute on each side if the oil is hot enough! (Do not flour the meat until JUST before you are ready to brown it, or the flour may get soggy, and the meat will not brown properly.) Transfer the browned veal to a warm platter.
3. Tip the skillet, and with a spoon, remove most of the fat. Turn the heat up to high, add the Marsala, and boil briefly, while you scrape any brown bits stuck to the pan. Add the butter, and any juices from the veal that may have collected on the platter. When the sauce thickens, turn the heat down to low, and add the scaloppine. Turn them to baste with the sauce. Serve immediately on a warm platter.

Teacherís Tip: Italians would serve this dish with a complementary vegetable and plenty of crusty bread to sop up the gravy.

Wine Tip: I would choose a Chianti Classico Riserva with this dish. Try one from Antinori, or Badia ŗ Coltibuono.
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Old 02-02-2008, 06:54 PM   #42
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chefjune, i think you misunderstood what i was trying to say...

i want the marsala flavor, no doubt. what i tried to say in that post is that the cream takes away the marsala flavor (lightens it a little) BUT that's what you want... the marsala flavor.

sorry for the confusion...

but thanks for the recipe.
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Old 02-02-2008, 11:52 PM   #43
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I misunderstood you as well, now it makes sense ;)
You want the marsala flavor, the cream takes some of that flavor away, so cream - not as good as sweet or dry...less marsala flavor.
Y'all got me thinking about making some now.. LOL.
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Old 02-17-2008, 10:52 PM   #44
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I misunderstood you as well, now it makes sense ;)
You want the marsala flavor, the cream takes some of that flavor away, so cream - not as good as sweet or dry...less marsala flavor.
Y'all got me thinking about making some now.. LOL.
not bragging, but i get compliments on my chicken marsala all the time.

my secret = high heat. high heat to sear and seal in the moisture in the chicken, and high heat to deglaze with just a little chicken stock first (1/2 cup) and then, a "slower" reduction with some good, sweet, lombardo marsala.

tonight, i made it using a little cream to "temper" the marsala flavor. i added about 1/4 cup which proved to be too much vs the 1/2 cup marsala... so i added in another 1/4 cup marsala and cranked up the heat.

it turned out good... but i prefer the stronger taste of the marsala to come thru.
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Old 02-18-2008, 09:50 AM   #45
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High heat does not seal in moisture. The only thing it does is create flavor (not a bad thing of course).

I have never added cream to my marsala. I prefer the stonger taste too.
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Old 02-18-2008, 10:12 AM   #46
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High heat does not seal in moisture. The only thing it does is create flavor (not a bad thing of course).

I have never added cream to my marsala. I prefer the stonger taste too.

I have done that. The cream adds a different mouth feel and a softer taste. I prefer it without but my daughters prefer the cream version.
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