"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-26-2007, 04:05 PM   #21
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 470
Maybe it's a joke.
__________________

__________________
carolelaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 10:25 AM   #22
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 605
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
BT and my exchange was based on the irony that if I really wanted to, I could've ripped into this recipe much, much, MUCH worse than you did (or at least what the OP thought you did. I didn't think you did at all). And I'm talking like Gordon Ramsay kinda ripping. And BT knows that which is why we made a joke of it.

I wasn't referring to your post at all. To say that I'm not "fond" of using an abundance of canned soup and mayonnaise in cooking? LOL that's like saying that the Yankees are not fond of throwing cash around. But, I quietly avoid conflict by not even bother reading threads that I know will touch that subject.
Actually, IC (may I call you IC?) , I had sort of figured all that out. I just used your post to make a point about not asking a question if you don't want honest answers.

BTW, your restraint is most admirable.
__________________

__________________
suzyQ3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 12:34 PM   #23
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin
If you don’t like Cream of Mushroom, how do you make Green Bean Casserole?
I once decided to make green bean casserole, completely from scratch, for
Thanksgiving, including home made cream of mushroom soup, from an Emeril LaGasse recipe. Does Emeril cook Thanksgiving dinner for the Salvation Army? His recipe made about 6 gallons of soup. I needed about a cup!

Oh and the major reason for people to hate, and steer clear of, canned soups, creamed or not, is the salt content. One can of cream of mushroom soup contains over 1600mg of sodium, which is almost 70% of your RDI, leaving very little room for seasoning anything else you're going to be eating that day.
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 01:26 PM   #24
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
I once decided to make green bean casserole, completely from scratch, for
Thanksgiving, including home made cream of mushroom soup, from an Emeril LaGasse recipe. Does Emeril cook Thanksgiving dinner for the Salvation Army? His recipe made about 6 gallons of soup. I needed about a cup!
I found this site for making a Green Bean Casserole from scratch. Maybe I’ll try it one day......but it is a LOT of work, and I might be too lazy to do this recipe.
__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 03:37 PM   #25
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
That's pretty much how I make grn bn casserole...it's awesome with real food. I actually make a mushroom veloute rather than a simple bechamel. But that's no big deal. Yeh it takes longer than opening a can of soup a can of beans and a can of onions, but it has way less fat, way less salt, and a LOT more flavor. really.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 03:51 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
That's pretty much how I make grn bn casserole...it's awesome with real food. I actually make a mushroom veloute rather than a simple bechamel. But that's no big deal. Yeh it takes longer than opening a can of soup a can of beans and a can of onions, but it has way less fat, way less salt, and a LOT more flavor. really.
If you’re making a mushroom veloute, how do you make the mushroom stock? Or do you start with a chicken veloute and then turn it into a supreme sauce by adding mushrooms and cream?
__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 05:31 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
I really, really want to say something, but I won't.
I remember when I was just beginning to learn the cooking arts. I thought hamburger helper was a gourmet meal back then. I can't stomach the flavor of it now. But we all start somewhere.

Homegrownrecipes; I won't tell you that yoru recipe doesn't taste amazing. I haven't tried it, and most likely won't. But that means absolutely nothing. I jsut have different tastes than do you. I can truly cook virtually anything I might want to cook, from canned beans with canned Vienna Sausage, to a wonderful rouladin stuffed with an herb/mushroom/crabmeat filling. Experience will truly give you a more refined pallate as you experiment and play with your recipes.

My youngest daughter started her cooking style by mixing various cans of veggies from the pantry, using the can-liquor (sp) to make the broth. she'd season with some garlic and onion, and various herbs from my herb & spice rack, and somehow, her concoctions came out very good. Over time, she grew more adventurous and learned the basic recipes for puff pastry (choux paste), for bread, quickbreads, pie crusts, various meats, and methods of cooking them, and then began to take on challenges such as helping make thanksgiving dinner. She is now, at the tender age of 21, a wonderful cook who suprizes her roomates and freinds with pastas, roast fowl, wonderful deserts, and still her favorite thing to make, homemade soups. She calls for advice every now and again, but just for a bit of info from her old man (that's me).

you will become more versatile with time, and will undoubtedly look back at your casserole and remember it with a smile. Don't ever let anyone tell you that what you like isn't good. If you like it, then it's good. You may one day prefer something else, but that's in the future. I mean, I still like potted-meat mixed with Miracle Whip and sweet pickle relish, slathered thickly on whole whet toast. Is it good for me? Not likely. Do I eat it often, or serve it to others; again, not likely. But I sure do crave that unhealthy, somewhat pathetic sandwich every now and again.

Don't let others tell you what to like or not like. Do take constructive criticism, and keep an open miind. Experiment. Immerse yourself into the cooking experience. It will open a whole world of flavors and experience for you. And maybe, just likek my daughter, you might just become the most sought after cook on the block.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 05:48 PM   #28
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Raton,NM, USA
Posts: 4,573
Im not touching this conversation with a 10 foot pole.
__________________
jpmcgrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 06:15 PM   #29
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
I remember when I was just beginning to learn the cooking arts. I thought hamburger helper was a gourmet meal back then. I can't stomach the flavor of it now. But we all start somewhere.

Homegrownrecipes; I won't tell you that yoru recipe doesn't taste amazing. I haven't tried it, and most likely won't. But that means absolutely nothing. I jsut have different tastes than do you. I can truly cook virtually anything I might want to cook, from canned beans with canned Vienna Sausage, to a wonderful rouladin stuffed with an herb/mushroom/crabmeat filling. Experience will truly give you a more refined pallate as you experiment and play with your recipes.

My youngest daughter started her cooking style by mixing various cans of veggies from the pantry, using the can-liquor (sp) to make the broth. she'd season with some garlic and onion, and various herbs from my herb & spice rack, and somehow, her concoctions came out very good. Over time, she grew more adventurous and learned the basic recipes for puff pastry (choux paste), for bread, quickbreads, pie crusts, various meats, and methods of cooking them, and then began to take on challenges such as helping make thanksgiving dinner. She is now, at the tender age of 21, a wonderful cook who suprizes her roomates and freinds with pastas, roast fowl, wonderful deserts, and still her favorite thing to make, homemade soups. She calls for advice every now and again, but just for a bit of info from her old man (that's me).

you will become more versatile with time, and will undoubtedly look back at your casserole and remember it with a smile. Don't ever let anyone tell you that what you like isn't good. If you like it, then it's good. You may one day prefer something else, but that's in the future. I mean, I still like potted-meat mixed with Miracle Whip and sweet pickle relish, slathered thickly on whole whet toast. Is it good for me? Not likely. Do I eat it often, or serve it to others; again, not likely. But I sure do crave that unhealthy, somewhat pathetic sandwich every now and again.

Don't let others tell you what to like or not like. Do take constructive criticism, and keep an open miind. Experiment. Immerse yourself into the cooking experience. It will open a whole world of flavors and experience for you. And maybe, just likek my daughter, you might just become the most sought after cook on the block.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Touché. But like Suzy said, one should not ask questions if they do not want to hear the answers.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 07:59 PM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,381
The only thing I will say is "be careful what you ask for"
__________________

__________________
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
Loprraine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.