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Old 11-02-2008, 04:23 PM   #11
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I often buy a frozen one. Cook it up and then cut it up and freeze bits of it. Breast slices for sandwiches, other bits for use in cooking.
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Old 11-02-2008, 05:14 PM   #12
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I thought about doing that too. But I want to be able to try different things by cooking different parts of the turkey. I think I'm gonna get one as soon as I find one. Be kinda nice to pull some turkey out and deep fry a piece, or roast a piece, pan fry... whatever! I know when I bought a turkey breast, that breast was enough for 2 or 3 meals for two.
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Old 11-03-2008, 07:58 AM   #13
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Sattie, I'm not sure about where you live, but here, I can get turkey parts pre-cut and packaged. While the price / pound is going to be more expensive than buying a whole one, the overall cost is cheaper for parts. Like Jeeks, I want to smoke some turkey legs. It would probably only cost me US$8.00 + tax to get enough turkey legs to feed my family. If you want to make stock, just by some wings, pan-roast or sear them off, add the veggies and water, and let it simmer for several hours. Wings will render A LOT of gelatin for a most delicious stock.
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:26 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
...In my experience, there is no economic advantage to purchasing a whole turkey, cutting it up, and freezing the parts.


Bigjim, around here, a whole turkey always has a lower 'per pound' price than turkey parts. I ran into this a couple of years ago when I wanted to buy some turkey wings to make a stock and found the wings were more per pound than a whole bird!
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Old 11-03-2008, 08:53 AM   #15
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Thank all for the replies... I'm going to find my bird, and there will be Turkey!!!! May get a couple and cut it up/ foodsaver it/ and I can have turkey done anyway I want. I really appreciate you taking the time to answer this post!!!
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Old 11-03-2008, 09:50 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Bigjim, around here, a whole turkey always has a lower 'per pound' price than turkey parts. I ran into this a couple of years ago when I wanted to buy some turkey wings to make a stock and found the wings were more per pound than a whole bird!
The last time I noticed fresh turkey here, it was about double the price of frozen. If I wanted to cut up a turkey and freeze, I would probably buy a frozen turkey and cut it up after patially thawing in the referigerator. I suspect that a whole lot of what we think of as fresh has been previously frozen. This probably applies to chickens and a lot of shellfish. When I buy chickens on sale, I buy a bunch and cut them up. I generally ask the meat manager for those not yet thawed, and thaw them in the referigerator to cut up, then immediately refreeze. I have had no problem. There is another thread here discussing refreezing chicken. Opinions seem to differ.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:13 AM   #17
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I agree with Allen about the price of turkey parts. Around here I can buy fresh wings, thighs, & drumsticks for a couple of bucks. Literally. And that's year-round. In fact, just yesterday two different markets had packages of fresh large drumsticks, 2 or 3 to a package, for $2 & change/package. I love buying those because they make excellent (& inexpensive) substitutes for braised dishes that normally call for lamb shanks (which husband doesn't eat). Wings & thighs are priced the same, as are turkey "chops" & "cutlets" (for sautes like "piccata" & "Marsala"), "tenderloins" (roasted whole or cut into kabobs), "ground" - heck, you name it.

I'd never bother spending the bucks for a whole turkey just to enjoy the quality & convenience I get in buying the parts. We do a whole fresh (organic free-range) turkey for Thanksgiving, which we order in advance, & sometimes a whole smoked turkey for Easter. That's it as far as dealing with a whole turkey.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:19 AM   #18
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I have trouble finding the parts unless I go to healthfood type stores. I see the ground turkey and the other processed turkey, I just want some actual turkey that I can dress up anyway I want. Skin on, skin off, you know. I think I am going to get a whole fresh one no matter what the cost. Just to try it out. Believe me, nothing will go to waste.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:38 AM   #19
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I never thought of using turkey legs in place of lamb or veal. Sounds interesting. With the price of veal shank over $10.00/lb here, I have not made Osso Bucco for a while. Turkey bucco? will have to try it. As a person that most often cooks for one, finding the right portion is a sometimes difficult. One turkey leg is about a single portion. Most of the time turkey parts are available here at reasonable prices.
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:46 AM   #20
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Sattie, is there a turkey farm near you? Look into that first. Might be a few bucks cheaper than a butcher. Here's mine.
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