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Old 10-10-2006, 11:09 PM   #41
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We usually use AB's fried chicken recipe, but fry it in an electric frying pan. (built in thermostat).

In the summer, we can cook it out on the deck, and keep all the mess on newspapers.

Check out Nick's onion soup recipe. Tried it today. Wow!!!!!!
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:26 AM   #42
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Hmmm... whats the difference between Traditional Fried Chicken Gravy and a White Sauce? Both start with a Roux, and then you add liquid. Veloute/Bechamel is pretty much a gravy that has been infused with some aromatics (onions/celery) and spices/herbs (thyme/parsley/pepper/garlic/bay). Then you just pour it through a fine-mesh sieve to remove the solids. The only difference I see is that with the traditional method you use some of the cooking fat, whereas with a white sauce you use whatever you want... butter/animal fat/oil/etc.

Yeah, I guess drizzling some gravy on the fried chicken would be blasphemous huh? I really like preparing food so that it requires no work on the part of the diner. I was thinking with boneless pieces they could cut it with the side of a fork rather than getting their fingers messy. I guess thats just one style that I've adopted in my cooking/serving. Those drumsticks certainly taste good to gnaw on though! But picking at the thighs just seemed awkward.

I'm really enjoying reading all the tips and techniques you guys have! I ran out of time yesterday and didn't get a chance to marinate my chicken pieces in buttermilk again, so I'll have to wait until tomorrow to try the next round of Fried Chicken. While I have the deep fryer out I'm going to try a few new beer-batter recipes someone gave me. I climbed an extra 50 flights of stairs yesterday to help make up for this stuff...
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Walt - Glad you liked the soup! I just bought a hunk of Gruyere the other day to make a batch this weekend. I probably shouldn't after eating all this Fried Chicken...

This weekend I'll be playing with some traditional shallow poaching recipes, so I guess that will help make up for it a bit too.
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:50 AM   #43
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Quote:
I was thinking with boneless pieces they could cut it with the side of a fork rather than getting their fingers messy
IMO, fried chicken is meant to be eaten with your hands. If you do boneless pieces, then it's not "Fried Chicken," its "Goujonettes!" Pardon me, but when I want fried chicken, I don't want anyone taking the bones out for me! Just my $.02
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:53 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune
IMO, fried chicken is meant to be eaten with your hands.
I couldn't agree more. The phase "finger lickin good" is around for that very reason
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Old 10-11-2006, 09:56 AM   #45
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I know... BLASPHEMY!

Actually, I got the idea from Alton Brown. His fried chicken recipe uses boneless breasts (with the skin left on) rather than splitting the chicken and leaving the ribs on. Seeing as eating the thighs with bones in seemed awkward to me, I figured why not do the same with the thigh-meat as well?

I do still have to test my theory though.
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Old 10-11-2006, 11:35 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I couldn't agree more. The phase "finger lickin good" is around for that very reason
" I agree w/both of these fine ppl., chicken must be eaten with the fingers- yum-- I sit a damp washcloth on a plate for anyone who may not lick their fingers! Love those thighs too-alot of meat on there. Not hard for me to eat ! Just enjoy Nicholas then wash your hands."
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:23 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
Veloute/Bechamel is pretty much a gravy that has been infused with some aromatics (onions/celery) and spices/herbs (thyme/parsley/pepper/garlic/bay). .
Veloute sauce is a white sauce made with stock instead of milk -- it doesn't necessarily have to have aromatics added, though it is tastier that way.

But anyway, my 2 cents is that when I want to use boneless breasts, I oven fry them. I have gotten to the point where my oven fried chicken is probably better than my pan fried, so I do this a lot. I make HUGE batches of chicken fingers this way when my niece and her family visits.

But if I want the real deal fried chicken experience, I always leave the bones in. The meat tastes better and is moister that way, IMO. Plus, that, to me, is what fried chicken is all about -- like others have said "finger lickin' good." My first job was at KFC and was hilarious and disgusting, but did get me a bit hooked on the stuff.
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:27 PM   #48
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Hey Nick... how about getting a pressure cooker/fryer and trying it the KFC way? Do so at your own risk!!
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Old 10-11-2006, 12:46 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher
I know... BLASPHEMY!

Actually, I got the idea from Alton Brown. His fried chicken recipe uses boneless breasts (with the skin left on) rather than splitting the chicken and leaving the ribs on. Seeing as eating the thighs with bones in seemed awkward to me, I figured why not do the same with the thigh-meat as well?

I do still have to test my theory though.
I know there are a lot of Alton Brown lovers around, but as far as I can see, he is a "theorist," not a cook. and certainly NOT a Chef. The aesthetics of eating Fried Chicken dictate that one pick it up with ones hands, and that it be on the bone. As I said before, otherwise, it's "Goujonettes!" Y'all want to make Fried Chicken French food???
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Old 10-11-2006, 01:28 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune
I know there are a lot of Alton Brown lovers around, but as far as I can see, he is a "theorist," not a cook. and certainly NOT a Chef. The aesthetics of eating Fried Chicken dictate that one pick it up with ones hands, and that it be on the bone. As I said before, otherwise, it's "Goujonettes!" Y'all want to make Fried Chicken French food???
I think the definition of "chef" is quite loose... the owner/proprietor/cook of a small restaurant is a chef just the same as the Thomas Keller is at the French Laundry. Personal Chefs are chefs just the same as chefs who run catering businesses - all the same, whether they have been to culinary school or not. In the business world there are "managers" - is the person who graduates from Harvard with a degree in "management" a "manager"? I dont think so. Does the project manager of an I.T. consulting firm become a "manager" when he manages a certain amount of clients, or a certain number of personnel, or when they put in x amount of hours, or when they handle a project that calls for x amount of dollars? What I am saying is that how and why one qualifies as a "manager" or a "chef" can be quite arbitrary.

Does it matter whether Alton Brown is or isnt a chef? I dont think so. Just like when I follow someone's good advice from someone here on the forum i am not concerned with whether they are or arent chefs.

On the topic of fried chicken, yes I prefer to eat it with my hands and get messy. Just like eating my buffalo wings. But I dont necessarily knock someone for suggesting a different approach. Hooters (ok, not a foodie establishment) has a buffalo wing sandwich in which they debone the wings; i dont think the buffalo wing sandwich would work with bone-in wings - this is certainly NOT French food!
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