"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-11-2007, 12:15 AM   #1
Cook
 
Easton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 66
Froze chicken twice

I bought some chicken a couple of weeks ago but I only used about a third of it and put it in the freezer. I defrosted it a few days later but then I changed my mind and refroze it again. Is the chicken still good? I also don't think I'll use all of it the next time around so I'll still have a third left, can I refreeze this bunch a third time?

__________________

__________________
Beginner cook!
Easton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 12:20 AM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: joisey
Posts: 18,598
so long as it was kept very cold when it was thawed, it should still be good. the texture will be off a little, and it won't be as flavorful as fresh chicken, of course.

i wouldn't freeze it a third time, though. it can't stay good forever.

when you thaw it, your nose will tell you if it's still good. if there's any odd smell at all, toss it.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.
beidh ar la linn.
wisdom is often in short supply within ones' ego.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 02:30 AM   #3
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,973
Next time you might want to divide it into the portions you want when you get home from the store, then freeze it. I buy a lot of family packs of meat because it is less expensive. Sometimes it is a pain in the neck to divide it when I get home, but I am always glad I did when it is time to prepare a meal later!

Barbara
__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 07:34 AM   #4
Sous Chef
 
bowlingshirt's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Compton
Posts: 551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbara L View Post
Next time you might want to divide it into the portions you want when you get home from the store, then freeze it. I buy a lot of family packs of meat because it is less expensive. Sometimes it is a pain in the neck to divide it when I get home, but I am always glad I did when it is time to prepare a meal later!
+ Gazillion. Buy fresh meat in bulk, break it up into smaller portions first, then freeze. You will then thaw out only what you need and won't have to keep re-freezing.
__________________
Official member of the club
Vegans die from arrogant smugness & sprout rot. - pighood
bowlingshirt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 08:49 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
I never re-freeze meat that's completely thawed. It's OK if it still has ice crystals in it, though.
What you can do is cook all of it and then freeze a portion of the cooked bird.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 11:04 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Aera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Easton View Post
I bought some chicken a couple of weeks ago but I only used about a third of it and put it in the freezer. I defrosted it a few days later but then I changed my mind and refroze it again. Is the chicken still good? I also don't think I'll use all of it the next time around so I'll still have a third left, can I refreeze this bunch a third time?

From what I know and have also done before, if you let it defrost in the refrigerator, you can safely refreeze it again even if it has completely thawed out.
__________________
Aera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 11:18 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 3,381
Interesting question. I've always been told never to re-freeze it. unless I fully cooked it.
__________________
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
Loprraine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2007, 11:30 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Aera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 140
This is very handy to have, USDA on safe food handling. Looks like I need 20 post to post the URL.


Basics for Handling Food Safely

Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential to prevent foodborne illness. You can't see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four Fight BAC! guidelines to keep food safe:
  • Clean Wash hands and surfaces often.
  • Separate Don't cross-contaminate.
  • Cook Cook to proper temperatures.
  • Chill Refrigerate promptly.
Shopping
  • Purchase refrigerated or frozen items after selecting your non-perishables.
  • Never choose meat or poultry in packaging that is torn or leaking.
  • Do not buy food past "Sell-By," "Use-By," or other expiration dates.
Storage
  • Always refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 F).
  • Check the temperature of your refrigerator and freezer with an appliance thermometer. The refrigerator should be at 40 F or below and the freezer at 0 F or below.
  • Cook or freeze fresh poultry, fish, ground meats, and variety meats within 2 days; other beef, veal, lamb, or pork, within 3 to 5 days.
  • Perishable food such as meat and poultry should be wrapped securely to maintain quality and to prevent meat juices from getting onto other food.
  • To maintain quality when freezing meat and poultry in its original package, wrap the package again with foil or plastic wrap that is recommended for the freezer.
  • In general, high-acid canned food such as tomatoes, grapefruit, and pineapple can be stored on the shelf for 12 to 18 months. Low-acid canned food such as meat, poultry, fish, and most vegetables will keep 2 to 5 years if the can remains in good condition and has been stored in a cool, clean, and dry place. Discard cans that are dented, leaking, bulging, or rusted.
Preparation
  • Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.
  • Don't cross-contaminate. Keep raw meat, poultry, fish, and their juices away from other food. After cutting raw meats, wash cutting board, utensils, and countertops with hot, soapy water.
  • Cutting boards, utensils, and countertops can be sanitized by using a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach in 1 gallon of water.
  • Marinate meat and poultry in a covered dish in the refrigerator.
Thawing
  • Refrigerator: The refrigerator allows slow, safe thawing. Make sure thawing meat and poultry juices do not drip onto other food.
  • Cold Water: For faster thawing, place food in a leak-proof plastic bag. Submerge in cold tap water. Change the water every 30 minutes. Cook immediately after thawing.
  • Microwave: Cook meat and poultry immediately after microwave thawing.
Cooking
  • Beef, veal, and lamb steaks, roasts, and chops may be cooked to 145 F.
  • All cuts of pork, 160 F.
  • Ground beef, veal and lamb to 160 F.
  • All poultry should reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 F.
Serving
  • Hot food should be held at 140 F or warmer.
  • Cold food should be held at 40 F or colder.
  • When serving food at a buffet, keep food hot with chafing dishes, slow cookers, and warming trays. Keep food cold by nesting dishes in bowls of ice or use small serving trays and replace them often.
  • Perishable food should not be left out more than 2 hours at room temperature (1 hour when the temperature is above 90 F).
Leftovers
  • Discard any food left out at room temperature for more than 2 hours (1 hour if the temperature was above 90 F).
  • Place food into shallow containers and immediately put in the refrigerator or freezer for rapid cooling.
  • Use cooked leftovers within 4 days.
Refreezing
Meat and poultry defrosted in the refrigerator may be refrozen before or after cooking. If thawed by other methods, cook before refreezing.
__________________

__________________
Aera is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002-2012 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cooking News & Tips Straight to your Email!

Stay up-to-date with Cooking info to your inbox!

unsusbcribe at anytime with one click

Close [X]