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Old 05-30-2005, 06:08 AM   #1
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Ground turkey jerky

I am wanting to make some ground turkey jerky because my mother has an allergy to beef, and cannot share the joy of consuming my homemade beef jerky. I was wondering if any safety precautions need be taken because turkey is poultry, and may contain bacteria. After I make the meat into strips, should I cook them for a minute or two, or should I just put them in my dehydrator (which gets up to 155 degrees)?

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Old 05-31-2005, 10:58 AM   #2
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bump.

i'm curious too. would like to make toikey joikey. anyone?
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Old 05-31-2005, 11:17 AM   #3
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I read that if you heat the meat up to 170 degrees fahrenheit, you'll be able to kill everything bad in it. So, do that before you put it in your dehydrator if you have one.
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Old 05-31-2005, 12:22 PM   #4
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Cut turkey with the grain for a chewytextured jerky, across the grain for a more brittle snack.

In addition to basic jerky seasonings, we include a teriyaki variation. For the liveliest flavor, let strips marinate the maximum time. Dry onion and garlic powders are options that give slightly more intense taste. If you want less saltiness, rinse the strips and pat them dry before drying. It's the drying step-in a dehydrator or oven-that removes moisture, inhibits bacterial development, and preserves the turkey.

Depending on how you store turkey jerky, it keeps well for quite a while.

Turkey Jerky

1 pound boned and skinned turkey

breast or tenderloins

1 tablespoon salt

1/2 cup water

2 tablespoons firmly packed brown

sugar

2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed, or

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 small onion, minced, or 1/2

teaspoon onion powder

1 teaspoon pepper

1/2 teaspoon liquid smoke

Nonstick cooking spray

Rinse meat and pat dry. Pull off and discard any fat and connective tissue. For easier slicing, freeze meat until it's firm but not hard. Cut into 1/2- to 1/2-inch-thick slices: cut breast piece with or across the grain, and tenderloins lengthwise.

In a bowl, stir together salt, water, brown sugar, garlic, onion, pepper, and liquid smoke. Add turkey and mix well. Cover and chill at least 1 hour or up to 24 hours; meat will absorb most of the liquid.

Depending upon drying method, evenly coat dehydrator racks (you need 3, each about 10 by 13 in.) or metal racks (to cover a 10- by 1 5-inch baking pan) with nonstick cooking spray.

Lift turkey strips from liquid, shaking off excess, and lay strips close together, but not overlapping, on racks.

In a dehydrator, arrange trays as manufacturer directs and dry at 140 degrees until a cool piece of jerky (remove from the dehydrator and let stand about 5 minutes) cracks and breaks when bent; this should take 4 1/2 to 5 hours.

In an oven set at 150 degrees to 200 degrees, place pan on center rack; prop door open about 2 inches. Dry until a cool piece of jerky (see above) cracks and breaks when bent, 3 to 5 hours.

Let jerky cool on racks, then remove. Serve, or store in airtight containers in a cool, dry place up to 3 weeks, in the refrigerator up to 4 months, or longer in the freezer. Makes about 7 ounces.

Per ounce : 88 cal. ; 15 g protein; 3 g carbo. ; 1g fat,- 40 mg chol.; 751 mg sodium.

Teriyaki Turkey Jerky

Prepare turkey jerky (recipe precedes), omitting salt and water. Add 1/4 cup soy sauce, regular or low-sodium; and 2 teaspoons Worcestershire.

Per ounce: 94 cal ; 16 g protein; 4 g carbo.; 1g fat,- 40 mg chol.; 498 mg sodium.
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Old 05-31-2005, 12:28 PM   #5
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thanks marge!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 05-31-2005, 01:05 PM   #6
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you are welcome..that was in Susnset Mag. I think it said 1988
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Old 05-31-2005, 01:05 PM   #7
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the jerky should be well dried by now...
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Old 05-31-2005, 06:21 PM   #8
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You could also consider making jerky with venison or bison Ive made it with bison and its really good.
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Old 01-31-2010, 08:21 PM   #9
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Talking Turkey Jerky revisited

I know this is a very old thread but in case anyone (like me) is doing a web search on the subject, here is some new info! In the discussion about making your Turkey Jerky safe...using Curing salt should do the trick. Largely this is if you dont eat it quickly or keep it in the fridge... or if you are using a longer dehydrating method. The units sold now are much faster at dehydrating since they use not only heat but a fan unit.

Curing salt, Curing salt was developed as a cure for meat, poultry, game, and fish. Also known as Prague powder #1, (Mortons Curing salt too) is a combination that is 93.75% salt and 6.25% sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. It is used in the preserving and curing of meats, and in sausage making. The nitrate component inhibits the growth of bacteria, specifically those which cause botulism, and helps preserve the color of cured meat. Curing salt containing sodium nitrite is the more commonly used of the two. Sodium nitrate breaks down more slowly, however, and will preserve meats for longer periods of time. Some brands are dyed a pink color to blend better with meat and to help differentiate its appearance from other salts. (wikipedia)
Here is a recipe I found showing the use of curing salt in Turkey Jerky.

Turkey Jerky

OH! and btw!!! I bought a lovely little unit today, similar to a cookie press...for making ground jerky. It's made by Autumn Harvest (Nesco) and it is called Jerky Works. Makes strips or pepperoni type shapes for your dehydrator. The jerky comes out just like the stuff you buy. My choice though is not to use their mixtures as they are loaded with msg. The press however is a wonder!
NESCO® American Harvest - Buy Online!

Good luck everyone!

Amber
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Old 01-31-2010, 09:50 PM   #10
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Stupid question,on my part.

I make jerky once or twice a year useing rump roast.I hate it when I slice the meat too thin,How can you possibly make jerky at home from ground meat?What would keep it from falling apart?I used to love the beef jerky when I was growing up that was a thin super compressed piece of something that was clearly ground up.The only reason you'd think it was meat is because it was brown.I therefore know it can be done, the only thing I can think of is useing asbestos as a binder.It was the cure all for anything and everything back then.I am kidding. I would opt for slices of which ever meat you choose.Who wants a long,thin dried up turkey burger?
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