"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-17-2016, 12:39 AM   #21
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I prefer chicken breast, much fewer ookies than thighs or legs, and I prefer the flavor. I used to just discard the dark meat after cooking a whole bird, but now I use it for stock and soup. I coated a bunch of breast nuggets in mayo and shook them up in a ziplock bag of seasoned panko last night, then baked them. Nice and moist, with a good crunch.
What the heck are "ookies"? And why would there be any such in a chicken thigh or drumstick? I've never seen anything particularly unappetizing in the dark meat, no more than the white meat.
__________________

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 09:22 AM   #22
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
What the heck are "ookies"? And why would there be any such in a chicken thigh or drumstick? I've never seen anything particularly unappetizing in the dark meat, no more than the white meat.
Dark meat chicken contains more cartilage and connective tissue which is why it needs to be cooked to a higher temperature.

Drums, in particular, contain tendons and other things that a lot of people find to be "ookie"
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 09:36 AM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,119
That's it exactly, Jennyema!
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 10:46 AM   #24
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Dark meat chicken contains more cartilage and connective tissue which is why it needs to be cooked to a higher temperature.

Drums, in particular, contain tendons and other things that a lot of people find to be "ookie"
I find that to be much more of a problem with a turkey drumstick than with chicken. And I don't see anything like that in the thigh.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 11:09 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Oh they are there in chicken, too. That's supposedly a picture of a chicken drumstick.

And thighs have more connective tissue and cartilage than breasts.

Just the nature of the beast.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 11:32 AM   #26
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,414
I get a chuckle when people say that boneless chicken breast is dry and has little flavor. Of course it doesn't. It's all protein and no fat and, without fat or another source of moisture, it's difficult to infuse flavor into the meat. As mentioned, a couple of things will help. First, you'll have better success with bone-in skin-on chicken breasts. If you are really opposed to eating the skin, then just remove it before eating. Personally, though, I think the skin is the only part of a chicken breast that has any flavor.

Also, brining will help, since, again, the brine provides a conduit for getting some flavor to the inside of the breast. I actually don't brine very often myself. In my opinion, it can contribute to sort of a "mushy" texture, for lack of a better word. What I typically do is salt and season the meat the night before I plan to cook it, and then leave it in the fridge to give those flavors time to transfer into the meat. Using brining solution helps provide some additional moisture, but I find it's still plenty moist as long as I leave the skin intact, as the fat in the skin also helps keep the interior moist.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 11:44 AM   #27
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,896
I agree with most of what you've said, Steve, although I don't think seasoning overnight is necessary. I recently made a Mexican-style casserole for a potluck. I seasoned boneless, skinless breasts with fajita seasoning (with a few extra shakes of stuff) and let it sit for about a half hour before cooking them in a sauté pan. They had lots of flavor.

Bobby Flay made chicken burritos for brunch recently. He fried the chicken skin and used them inside the burritos as cracklins'
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 11:46 AM   #28
Certifiable Executive Chef
 
Janet H's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 3,283
I think one of the biggest issues with most chicken is that it's factory raised and lacking flavor. Periodically we get an uncaged (free range) chicken and you can smell the difference as it cooks! More flavor, not boring and a little more fat IN the meat rather than just under the skin. The difference is quite astonishing. We seem to have forgotten that chicken can be ... well, succulent instead of bland, boring and dry.
__________________
Forget love... I'd rather fall in chocolate!
Janet H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 12:05 PM   #29
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Dark meat chicken contains more cartilage and connective tissue which is why it needs to be cooked to a higher temperature.

Drums, in particular, contain tendons and other things that a lot of people find to be "ookie"
Ookies, lol! DH and I are perfectly matched. He prefers dark meat and I prefer white, although both of us will eat either one. But when we have legs or thighs, he finishes what I don't eat from them. Insists I leave too much meat!
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2016, 12:22 PM   #30
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Dark meat chicken contains more cartilage and connective tissue which is why it needs to be cooked to a higher temperature.

Drums, in particular, contain tendons and other things that a lot of people find to be "ookie"
Ahh Haa....now I see why I don't like drums, only thighs.
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chicken, chicken breast, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.