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Old 10-13-2005, 01:48 AM   #11
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Julia Child had a recipe that I have used several times, but unfortunately cannot find it at the moment and it has been several years since I have made it.

Basically, you remove the legs, cut off the back, stuff the breast and cook the legs and breast together. You use the back and the rest of the stuff (necks, giblets, etc.) to make a stock for gravy.

The advantage for you is that you reduce a bigger bird to the size of the breast, making lots of room in the oven.

The other advantage is that you avoid the problem of the breast being overdone when the legs are cooked through.

Always came out very good. Used to do the butchering myself, but suppose you could get your butcher to do it.

If I can find the recipe will post, maybe someone else has it.

It was one of my favorite ways to make the bird. Just sort of forgot about it until your post.
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Old 10-13-2005, 02:13 AM   #12
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Goodweed of the North,

Thank you very much for your reply. I am starting to gain confidence on this again.

So, do you think I should marinate it in a bryne the night before, or just as is?

Also, should I stick with the smaller bird (and perhaps cook two separately) I decided to change to, to ensure the skin is as far away from the walls (where the heating elements hide behind) as possible, or can I go with the bigger bird (see dimensions of oven and turkey in original post) as long as I keep the foil on it to reflect some of the heat?

Thanks bunches,

JH
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Old 10-13-2005, 02:20 AM   #13
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Ahhh, but again, I live in Japan and the turkeys are imported - i.e. I doubt a Japanese butcher would be willing to dissect a turkey I bring in off the street.

Nice advice tho...thanks.
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Old 10-13-2005, 08:39 AM   #14
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just wondering about the electric roaster, beacuse they do work...you couldn't go on the internet and purchase one? or is current so differnt in Japan that it wouldn't be compatible?
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Old 10-13-2005, 12:24 PM   #15
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Wrapping the turkey up in foil will make it take longer to cook and will prevent the skin form getting brown and crispy. IMO, that's a bad idea, as the entire point of roasting with dry heat is to brown the meat.

I would stick to the samller bird or spatchcock the larger one to facilitate cooking.

And definitely brine it in a salt/sugar solution if you can.
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Old 10-13-2005, 12:43 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Wrapping the turkey up in foil will make it take longer to cook and will prevent the skin form getting brown and crispy. IMO, that's a bad idea, as the entire point of roasting with dry heat is to brown the meat.

I would stick to the samller bird or spatchcock the larger one to facilitate cooking.

And definitely brine it in a salt/sugar solution if you can.
Jenny; I don't wrap in foil, just place foil on the breast skin. This serves to allow all the meat to cook at the same rate. The dark meat gets done at the same time as the dark meat. Then, about thirty minutes or so before it's time to remove the turkey, I remove all foil and brown the skin to a crispy golden brown.

And to answer the question posed, yes. Brining will make the brid more juicy.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-13-2005, 12:48 PM   #17
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GW,

Re: foil, I do just the opposite.

I cook the bird at high heat (450-500)for a while (depends on weight), then turn to 375.

I turn the bird around once from left to right to account for the higher temp at the back of the oven and tent the breast at the end if it's getting too brown.

I tried it your way but could never get the breast to brown up the way I like, as I always mistimed taking the foil off.
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Old 10-13-2005, 05:14 PM   #18
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I've done it your way too. I find that it really doesn't make a great deal of difference, as long as you give the skin sufficient time to brown.

There have even been time when I forgot to take the foil off, and then had to brown the sking with the broiler. That worked pretty well also. And onece, just once, I browned the skin outside the oven with a propane torch. Now that was a pain. But no one could tell the difference when it was done.

I feel that the meat is the most important part. For me, both the white and dark meat have to be extremely juicy and tender. The crispy skin is a definite bonus that I strive for. It's yummy.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-13-2005, 08:54 PM   #19
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Does anybody have a nice and easy, yet delicious brine recipe?

I heard that the whole bird must be submerged overnight in the brine (usually in a large container). What about putting the bird in a large cooking bag, then adding the brine and tying it up, would that work? I ask cuz my fridge - along with my stove - is Japanese-sized, so space is limited.

One other thing: I HAVE seen some brine recipes, and they all call for "kosher" salt. Not sure exactly what that is, nor if I can get it here. However, what if I used "sea salt", would that work?

JH
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Old 10-13-2005, 09:22 PM   #20
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You should still have plenty of meat with a turkey weighing 12 pounds. We always roast the day before. I posted all about it in another thread. I'll look for it and let you know where it is so you can find it.
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