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Old 11-30-2013, 10:36 AM   #21
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I admit I know there is heat loss when basting. And I basted approx. per half hour the last 2 hours. It takes time to pull out the rack, so you can get at the bird and dibble up some drippings with a baster and repeat. I figure that just makes it seem like you are cooking low and slow, although that wasn't the goal. The turkey came up to temp just at 15 minutes well before the old 15-18-20 minutes/ lb that cooking instrux offer before I had a probe to check it.

G G did you cover your turkey with foil or a foil tent?
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New question. What is the purpose of a Roaster Cover? It doesn't fit once a turkey is in the roaster. I think if you covered it, it would steam rather than roast.
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Old 11-30-2013, 10:46 AM   #22
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I admit I know there is heat loss when basting. And I basted approx. per half hour the last 2 hours. It takes time to pull out the rack, so you can get at the bird and dibble up some drippings with a baster and repeat. I figure that just makes it seem like you are cooking low and slow, although that wasn't the goal. The turkey came up to temp just at 15 minutes well before the old 15-18-20 minutes/ lb that cooking instrux offer before I had a probe to check it.

G G did you cover your turkey with foil or a foil tent?
--

New question. What is the purpose of a Roaster Cover? It doesn't fit once a turkey is in the roaster. I think if you covered it, it would steam rather than roast.
I tented it loosely with foil after two hours because the skin was browning really well by then.

I've never had a roasting pan with a cover, but my guess is that it could be used to turn the roaster into a braiser.
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Old 11-30-2013, 11:04 AM   #23
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GG, I had one when I first got married. I used to roast whole chickens in it. My husband brought it to the marriage. It does a beautiful job on chickens. They do have bigger ones for turkeys. The purpose is to do away with basting. My roaster had a vent on the sides. It controlled the amount of heat maintained inside the roaster. I used it for all roasts. Loved it. Don't know what happened to it. I think I sent a dinner to someone in it and never got it back.
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Old 11-30-2013, 12:10 PM   #24
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GG, I had one when I first got married. I used to roast whole chickens in it. My husband brought it to the marriage. It does a beautiful job on chickens. They do have bigger ones for turkeys. The purpose is to do away with basting. My roaster had a vent on the sides. It controlled the amount of heat maintained inside the roaster. I used it for all roasts. Loved it. Don't know what happened to it. I think I sent a dinner to someone in it and never got it back.
Basting was never necessary; it's one of those things people believed and passed on, even though there was never any evidence for it.

It seems to me that cooking poultry in a covered pan would cause it to steam, as Whiska said, and so it wouldn't brown and get crispy. Was that your experience, Addie?
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Old 11-30-2013, 12:52 PM   #25
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Basting was never necessary; it's one of those things people believed and passed on, even though there was never any evidence for it.

It seems to me that cooking poultry in a covered pan would cause it to steam, as Whiska said, and so it wouldn't brown and get crispy. Was that your experience, Addie?
No. My roaster had vents in the two sides. So the steam escaped. What didn't go out the vents, went to the top of the lid and fell down on the bird, constantly basting it. The roaster also had a low rack so that the bird did not sit in any accumulated juices that were emitted from the bird. I always put the bird in just seasoned and dry. No liquid. The bird made its own juices. Enough for a gravy. The two vents were adjustable and I could control the amount of heat that remained in the roaster. I usually (if I remember right) opened the one all the way where the head was and closed the one where the bottom of the legs were. That way, the breast browned without being soggy. Yet it still got basted. I never had a dry bird.

I also used this roaster for a pot roast. For that I would close both vents as I wanted it to collect all the juices from the piece of beef. Halfway through, I would turn the piece of beef over. Always tender and moist.

As my husband was a pro chef, he had this on any job he worked at. It was his personal roaster.
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Old 11-30-2013, 01:02 PM   #26
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Granite Ware Covered Rectangular Roaster | CHEFScatalog.com

My roaster was similar to this one only it was heavy aluminum and had vents. Take a look at some of the reviews and you will see why so many folks think a roaster is the way to go.
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Old 11-30-2013, 02:14 PM   #27
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The big vented roasting pan that comes with the oven that a lot of people never utilize?
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Old 11-30-2013, 03:04 PM   #28
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Thanks for your explanations.

I'm pretty sure Dx gave away her big roaster like Addie's as her brother in recent years hosted T'sgiving, but now he's switching to Christmas, so we had turkey day this year.

Braising. That was the word I was trying to think of. I guess when you braise, it steams too. The roaster we used is more like the one pictured below, and it may not be as deep as this one looks or else the bird was almost as big as the pan. as there was no ability for any self basting. It sat on a flat trivet ( for lifting), but it stewed in its own juices, so to speak.

Well, the bottom line is the bird was moist, flavorful and juicy. For some reason I don't worry about that when I (rarely ) roast a whole chicken uncovered and it's not basted. And yes, it might get tented w/ foil if it starts to brown too much on top before it's done. I think the size of a turkey seems more daunting.
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Old 11-30-2013, 04:29 PM   #29
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Off the subject a little bit, but my sister in law cooks turkey well, but has a habit of opening the oven door, pulling out the rack to baste it. The thing is, it drops the oven temp quite a bit because she takes her time basting it. She does this quite a few times during cooking. I've always been of the mind to try and keep the bird cooking with as few oven cool downs as possible. Are many successive oven cool downs somewhat harmful to making the turkey cook up as best it can, or does it matter (takes longer)?

I'd be scared if she was able to read this, btw.
I always thought basting was pointless and complicated. Then Alton Brown confirmed it.

Skin is a moisture barrier. That's why you push butter under it.

Basting doesn't do anything meaningful on any front.
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Old 11-30-2013, 09:19 PM   #30
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Thanks for your explanations.

I'm pretty sure Dx gave away her big roaster like Addie's as her brother in recent years hosted T'sgiving, but now he's switching to Christmas, so we had turkey day this year.

Braising. That was the word I was trying to think of. I guess when you braise, it steams too. The roaster we used is more like the one pictured below, and it may not be as deep as this one looks or else the bird was almost as big as the pan. as there was no ability for any self basting. It sat on a flat trivet ( for lifting), but it stewed in its own juices, so to speak.

Well, the bottom line is the bird was moist, flavorful and juicy. For some reason I don't worry about that when I (rarely ) roast a whole chicken uncovered and it's not basted. And yes, it might get tented w/ foil if it starts to brown too much on top before it's done. I think the size of a turkey seems more daunting.
That roaster has the handle on the top. It will often interfere with fitting the pan in the oven if the oven is on the small size. Like an apartment size stove. Mine had the handles on the side and made it much easier to remove the lid. Dang, I miss that roaster. Now that I think of it, I believe my sister borrowed it and never returned it. Now she's gone and I will never know what happened to it.
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