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Old 11-30-2013, 10:42 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I always thought basting was pointless and complicated. Then Alton Brown confirmed it.

Skin is a moisture barrier. That's why you push butter under it.

Basting doesn't do anything meaningful on any front.
Sure it does. It gives you extra opportunities to burn your hands by brushing against the grates or sides or top of the oven.

When I think about it, basting doesn't really make any sense. I won't be doing it anymore, at least not for birds.
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Old 12-02-2013, 03:37 PM   #32
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No. My roaster had vents in the two sides. So the steam escaped. What didn't go out the vents, went to the top of the lid and fell down on the bird, constantly basting it.
It seems weird that an environment moist enough to constantly baste/wet the skin was dry enough to crisp it.
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Old 12-03-2013, 01:29 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
It seems weird that an environment moist enough to constantly baste/wet the skin was dry enough to crisp it.
True, but the secret is that the lids do not fit tightly thus a lot of the steam can escape. Yet enough remains so that you can have juices left for gravy. On my roaster, it was lost through the vents on the side. It does defy logic, but for some crazy reason, it works. A lovely browned turkey breast with moist meat. You have a Norman Rockwell turkey for the holidays.
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Old 12-06-2013, 06:58 AM   #34
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First married, no $, just moved into very tired apartment, summer. Found turkeys on sale at ridiculously low price and purchased a relatively small one. Put in oven at 375 or so (long time ago - memory fade). Hour and a few minutes later peeked - sure looked done. Was a tad dry, but pretty good bird.

Bought oven thermometer, found oven had two temps - off and tropics in Hades (well over 500 degrees). Learned a whole lot about high temp roasting until lease ran out.

Now inject with melted butter, roast at 375 with breast down until about an hour before anticipated doneness, then flip over. Check thereafter carefully with good instant read thermometer. Very juicy birds.
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Old 12-06-2013, 07:30 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by auntdot View Post
First married, no $, just moved into very tired apartment, summer. Found turkeys on sale at ridiculously low price and purchased a relatively small one. Put in oven at 375 or so (long time ago - memory fade). Hour and a few minutes later peeked - sure looked done. Was a tad dry, but pretty good bird.

Bought oven thermometer, found oven had two temps - off and tropics in Hades (well over 500 degrees). Learned a whole lot about high temp roasting until lease ran out.

Now inject with melted butter, roast at 375 with breast down until about an hour before anticipated doneness, then flip over. Check thereafter carefully with good instant read thermometer. Very juicy birds.
auntdot's back! Good to see you.

Funny story
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Old 12-06-2013, 09:39 AM   #36
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I have a deep aluminum roaster that was my mother's and usually use that for turkey, without the lid. This year, since I was cooking 2 turkeys, I used 2 smaller pans so they would both fit in the oven. They each had a V-shaped rack that came with them. This kept the turkey up away from the accumulated drippings, and since the pans were not deep they were just sitting up high in the oven. I also used the "convection roast" feature of the oven. They were nicely browned all over because they were not sitting down in the deep pan, and the breast meat was very moist and tasty. This is how I will do my turkeys from now on. Also, I was cooking them at 325 and when they appeared to be getting done too soon I turned the oven down to 300. Convection cooks faster than the regular oven, I think.
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Old 12-11-2013, 02:27 PM   #37
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I am old school.
325į for the entire roasting time.
I brush the bird with oil or butter and heavily season the outside and the inside.
I roast breast side down for 1/2 roasting time.
I always use a rack.
I never baste or open the oven accept to check with a temp probe or to turn it over.

It works well for me. Moist meat and crispy skin.
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Old 12-06-2016, 08:26 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
I admit I know there is heat loss when basting. And I basted approx. per half hour the last 2 hours. It takes time to pull out the rack, so you can get at the bird and dibble up some drippings with a baster and repeat. I figure that just makes it seem like you are cooking low and slow, although that wasn't the goal. The turkey came up to temp just at 15 minutes well before the old 15-18-20 minutes/ lb that cooking instrux offer before I had a probe to check it.

G G did you cover your turkey with foil or a foil tent?
--

New question. What is the purpose of a Roaster Cover? It doesn't fit once a turkey is in the roaster. I think if you covered it, it would steam rather than roast.
I used to have one of these inherited from my Mother when she moved house. OK for pot-roast or braising with only a little liquid. The lid probably has "pimples" which are supposed to collect steam of fat and baste the contents. I ended up using mother's mainly as a stew pot
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Old 12-06-2016, 09:20 AM   #39
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You sure have a knack for turning up old threads This one's three years old
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Old 12-06-2016, 11:36 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
I used to have one of these inherited from my Mother when she moved house. OK for pot-roast or braising with only a little liquid. The lid probably has "pimples" which are supposed to collect steam of fat and baste the contents. I ended up using mother's mainly as a stew pot
I have one and it has vents that are adjustable at each end of the cover. I will be using it today for the fresh pork shoulder roast.
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