"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-26-2014, 11:43 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
What dry brine recipe are you planning to use? Someone else I know was asking about that.
No recipe GG.
I had about two tablespoons of my homemade "Essence" left in my shaker bottle.
So I added about a tablespoon more of garlic powder.
A Tablespoon of kosher salt.
A tablespoon of fresh cracked pepper.
Some ground Thyme and sage and shook it up real good.

I liberally seasoned the inside and outside of the turkey last night and left it uncovered in the fridge to help dry it some.
I used the spice mixture quite heavily. I hope it will not be to salty. Its sure gonna have taste for sure.
I roast my turkey with breast side down for half the cooking time.
__________________

__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2014, 06:18 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
[snip]I roast my turkey with breast side down for half the cooking time.
Do you find that helps for a moister bird?

I understand the theory but haven't found it worth the effort to try it myself.
__________________

__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:04 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
Do you find that helps for a moister bird?

I understand the theory but haven't found it worth the effort to try it myself.
Absolutely! I used a non -injected fresh turkey and the white meat was as moist as the inner thigh meat. And this is a serious comment.

I am always asked how I accomplish this moistness. Most are not able or interested in turning a hot bird half way through the roasting process.
How would you know if its worth the effort if you have never tried the method? I bet once you try it, you will be sold as I am.

For the record. Our 20 lb turkey took exactly 3 hours. 325F. Empty cavity. Heavily seasoned inside and out.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:20 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
+1 on breast down to start.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2014, 01:54 PM   #15
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
[snip].
How would you know if its worth the effort if you have never tried the method? I bet once you try it, you will be sold as I am. [snip]
I asked because I've never had a problem with the turkey being moist without flipping it 1/2 way thru roasting it conventionally without flipping it. I keep an eye out for internal temps haven't had any difficulties.


"Most are not able or interested in turning a hot bird half way through the roasting process."

That's why I ask. I'm one of those not interested in fighting a hot bird unless it makes a significant difference in the outcome.

I'm not one to heavily spice my bird other then lots of butter, S & P. and maybe some thyme.

Guess I'll have to give flipping a hot turkey over for myself and see if I feel it necessary.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 11:25 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
I asked because I've never had a problem with the turkey being moist without flipping it 1/2 way thru roasting it conventionally without flipping it. I keep an eye out for internal temps haven't had any difficulties.


"Most are not able or interested in turning a hot bird half way through the roasting process."

That's why I ask. I'm one of those not interested in fighting a hot bird unless it makes a significant difference in the outcome.

I'm not one to heavily spice my bird other then lots of butter, S & P. and maybe some thyme.

Guess I'll have to give flipping a hot turkey over for myself and see if I feel it necessary.
So, just roast it the way you always have. It is how I roast mine. Its up to you how you roast yours.
Suggestions do not require any action. They are suggestions.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 03:11 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
So, just roast it the way you always have. It is how I roast mine. Its up to you how you roast yours.
Suggestions do not require any action. They are suggestions.
Just wanted opinions about the method and if it actually delivered a better bird.

I know that with my luck we'd be doing the hot turkey dance as it scooted across the floor.

And the added spices from the floor wouldn't do much to improve the flavor.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 03:23 PM   #18
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
Just wanted opinions about the method and if it actually delivered a better bird...
Here's my opinion:

Roasting the bird breast side down for some portion of the cooking time does not result in a moister breast meat.

When a protein such as meat and fish is heated, its cells contract, squeezing moisture out. As the meat cooks, it's not capable of absorbing moisture. If you cook the turkey upside down, any juices that originate above the breasts will run down over and around the breast meat.

If you choose to brine a turkey, the brine will add flavor and diminish the loss of liquid.

When you take a roasted bird out of the oven and let it rest for 30 minutes or so, the contracted muscles relax and re-absorb some of the juices that were squeezed out during the roasting.

Most important of all, if you want moist breast meat, don't overcook the bird. Bottom line, overcooking cries out the meat.

That's how I see it.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 04:31 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,229
Thank you again Andy,

That's where my mind was tending and why I watch temps while roasting.

I might give the hot turkey dance a try one day out of curiosity.

Who knows. Those floor spices might add a whole new dimension to my turkey.

And now to drift this thread further(I know that never happens here) Since we now have an Andypants posting are we to assume you're posting sans pants?

Or are they just wearing your hand me downs.
__________________
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2014, 06:11 PM   #20
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
...And now to drift this thread further(I know that never happens here) Since we now have an Andypants posting are we to assume you're posting sans pants?

Or are they just wearing your hand me downs.
You've got it wrong. Andypants because he's out of breath. I'm just better conditioned so I can breathe normally.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.