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Old 06-20-2012, 11:14 AM   #21
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While this is the way to go, cleaning the rack is the challenge.
Soak it in soapy water in the sink, or spray with oven cleaner, or one then the other.

Also, if you have a rack you often use for this, does not have to be perfectly clean. The carbonized stuff is in some ways analogous to a seasoned cast iron pan.
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Old 06-20-2012, 11:43 AM   #22
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...Also, if you have a rack you often use for this, does not have to be perfectly clean. The carbonized stuff is in some ways analogous to a seasoned cast iron pan.
Not sure it that works on a chrome plated wire rack.
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Old 06-20-2012, 12:20 PM   #23
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Depends on your definition of "works" and how critical you are about "clean."

I have commercial racks purchased at a restaurant supply store. They might be stainless steel. After a few dozen uses I clean them with oven cleaner spray.
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Old 06-20-2012, 03:29 PM   #24
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I saw on the show the Chew Michael symon baked his wings and then when done, deep fried them only for a couple of min. I tried this and they came out great ! not oily like if you deep fried them from the start. Nice and crispy.
Damnit man...the idea is not to have to get out the deep fat fryer from the cupboard. Lazy oven baked.
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Old 06-20-2012, 05:02 PM   #25
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Old 06-20-2012, 06:56 PM   #26
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I've never tried baking chicken wings. The grease collected allows the skin to get crispy (?), and drain the excess grease periodically as that will make the skin rubbery? I've got to try that one of these nights when it's too much bother to deep fry. A simple dry rub is probably a good idea too, and I can always coat them with some sort of Buffalo wing sauce near the end of the cooking. Thanks for those tips (I'll forgo any kind of coating).

Correct, draining excess grease will keep them from being rubbery, also make sure to prod them to keep from sticking. It takes a good while for oven baked crispy wings, but it is worth the wait, and making sure they are not cooking in luke warm grease or sauce will assure you they will not get soggy on ya! Cheers.
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Old 06-20-2012, 07:36 PM   #27
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75+ minutes...huh? OK i guess. That long..huh? I'm game. Reynold's non-stick foil is expensive, I keep a roll on hand.
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Old 06-21-2012, 01:29 AM   #28
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i'm not sure i'm being clear.

you use the broiler for direct, very hot heat, but you foil the broiler tray so as to collect a little of the rendered fat which causes the side that's 'down" (away from the broiler flames) to fry slightly in the hot fat. flipping the wings allows both sides to experience both dry, direct heat, as well as hot rendered fat frying.

hth.
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Old 06-21-2012, 01:52 AM   #29
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i'm not sure i'm being clear.

you use the broiler for direct, very hot heat, but you foil the broiler tray so as to collect a little of the rendered fat which causes the side that's 'down" (away from the broiler flames) to fry slightly in the hot fat. flipping the wings allows both sides to experience both dry, direct heat, as well as hot rendered fat frying.

hth.
You were clear with me the first time, if a deep pan, drain periodically. I have a small broiler pan tho (see pic).
I get what you mean by retaining some fat to crisp up the chicken. I was thinking of using a deep pan coated with non-stick foil and drain the fat periodically, keep a little behind.


Maybe I'll try cooking the wings on it ( I noted your how to). My aunt gave us a Norpro as an x-mas gift 25 years ago. I prefer the stainless steel on over the non-stick. I love this broiler pan, btw.
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Old 06-21-2012, 02:31 AM   #30
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i'm not sure i'm being clear.

you use the broiler for direct, very hot heat, but you foil the broiler tray so as to collect a little of the rendered fat which causes the side that's 'down" (away from the broiler flames) to fry slightly in the hot fat. flipping the wings allows both sides to experience both dry, direct heat, as well as hot rendered fat frying.

hth.
Sorry, I got confused about broiling and using a broil pan. As a matter of fact...forget it...lol.
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