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Old 04-19-2010, 09:23 PM   #1
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How to know when small pieces of chicken are cooked

Hi,

I liked to make wraps using chicken thighs I have frozen in my freezer. I first defrost the chicken thigh in the microwave on the defrost setting, then tear it up into small pieces so it cooks faster and cook it up in a frying pan with a bit of olive oil.

My question is, because I'm cooking small pieces of chicken, I can fit a meat thermometer into the pieces, so how can I tell when the chicken is properly cooked?

Thanks,

Omelas

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Old 04-19-2010, 09:46 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Omelas0469 View Post
...My question is, because I'm cooking small pieces of chicken, I can fit a meat thermometer into the pieces, so how can I tell when the chicken is properly cooked?

Thanks,

Omelas
A meat thermometer won't help with small pieces. You have to judge by change in texture and color. The color will change from translucent to opaque and the texture will change to be firm.
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Old 04-19-2010, 09:56 PM   #3
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I cook chicken thighs like this all the time. Just cut open a sampling of the small pieces to make sure they're cooked through. No pinkness or red juices should be apparent.
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Old 04-20-2010, 12:54 AM   #4
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cut open a sampling of the small pieces to make sure they're cooked through. No pinkness or red juices should be apparent.
Thanks. This is just the kind of testing technique I was looking for.

I love chicken but I find cooking it to be such a hassle since I'm always worried about undercooking it because of the health risk associated with undercooked chicken. This tip brought me one step closer to chicken-cooking nirvana.

Cheers,

Omelas
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Old 04-20-2010, 07:18 PM   #5
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you can also close your pinky finger to the tip of your thumb, now feel the meaty part of the ball of your hand(base of your thumb), it should be firm. That is how a cooked piece of chicken should feel.

And, A friendly chart to show for all stages of temp. This way, you don't have to cut into anything making a passage for juices to flow out of.
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Old 04-20-2010, 07:41 PM   #6
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LOL!!! Yup - I'm definitely going to do that when I have small bite-size pieces of chicken thigh braising away rather than just cutting into a couple of them. Gee - just think of the "passage of juices" flowing out of a couple of small bite-size pieces of chicken. The whole dish would be ruined!!!! LOL!!!!!

Good grief.
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Old 04-20-2010, 07:49 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
LOL!!! Yup - I'm definitely going to do that when I have small bite-size pieces of chicken thigh braising away rather than just cutting into a couple of them. Gee - just think of the "passage of juices" flowing out of a couple of small bite-size pieces of chicken. The whole dish would be ruined!!!! LOL!!!!!

Good grief.
yeah, such a bad idea of knowing more then one way to skin a cat.
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Old 04-20-2010, 08:20 PM   #8
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I think Tat's point is that if you get used to testing it by feel, you don't have to take the time to cut in either. Just touch it and you'll know when it's done. After nearly 50 years of cooking, I never cut into meat, and I rarely use a thermometer. I just push gently, and know how done it is.

I the long run, it really is an excellent technique to learn.
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Old 04-20-2010, 09:12 PM   #9
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For goodness sake - Read the OP's post for comprehension. We're talking about itty-bitty bite-size pieces here, not whole pieces of chicken. Pushing & prodding really isn't feasible. I still maintain that it's best to just cut into a few. Good grief.
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:45 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
For goodness sake - Read the OP's post for comprehension. We're talking about itty-bitty bite-size pieces here, not whole pieces of chicken. Pushing & prodding really isn't feasible. I still maintain that it's best to just cut into a few. Good grief.

lol, different strokes for different folks. No reason to get snarky or bent out of shape, GOOD GRIEF, lol!~
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