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Old 11-20-2011, 12:24 AM   #11
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I'm gonna get an organic one I think, aren't the butterball etc varieties pre-brined with their solution? I wan't to try my own with some rosemary sprigs and other herbs.

And I won't eat that cranberry sauce, Ever since I saw it as a kid I knew I would never consume it. I have weird food rules: I don't eat white stuff like mayo or cream based sauces, most cheeses, things in cans or was introduced to me in cans, ketchup on things etc. My fiancee drinks eggnog and I'm horrified. I always wear a disappointed look when she gives it to our daughter.

Give me any vegetable or plant based food and I'll eat it, but I wouldn't eat a tablespoon of ranch dressing for a hundred dollars.
Here is a thread that you might like. Combinations that just strike you as wrong
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Old 11-20-2011, 02:36 AM   #12
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I am being forced to cook this year. There will only be 4 of us so I'm thinking I'll just go for an organic whole turkey breast instead of a full turkey.

I've never cooked anything like this, I'm worried about it drying out so I'm considering brining it, I've only ever done this with pork chops, is this a good idea? What would be a good technique, high heat initially then lowering it to finish cooking?

Also does anybody know a good simple stuffing recipe? I work in a grocery store and we have tons of different types of those packs of dried bread from Pepperidge Farms etc, or do I use regular bread and just tear it up?

Thanks!
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Originally Posted by callahan9119 View Post

And I won't eat that cranberry sauce, Ever since I saw it as a kid I knew I would never consume it. I have weird food rules: I don't eat white stuff like mayo or cream based sauces, most cheeses, things in cans or was introduced to me in cans, ketchup on things etc. My fiancee drinks eggnog and I'm horrified. I always wear a disappointed look when she gives it to our daughter.

Give me any vegetable or plant based food and I'll eat it, but I wouldn't eat a tablespoon of ranch dressing for a hundred dollars.
and now we know why you are being "forced to cook this year".
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:33 PM   #13
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We're roasting a breast as well; nobody else in the house likes dark meat, so essentially, we pay more to eat less. I generally follow the package instructions and get prefectly cooked meat every time. Keeping the breast from falling over in the roasting pan can be a chellenge; I use an overturned (oven-safe) ramekin or bowl underneath the keel bone. You could also use a ball of foil to hold it up.

For some reason, I am looking forward to this meal more than I have in years!
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:00 PM   #14
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We're roasting a breast as well; nobody else in the house likes dark meat, so essentially, we pay more to eat less. I generally follow the package instructions and get prefectly cooked meat every time. Keeping the breast from falling over in the roasting pan can be a chellenge; I use an overturned (oven-safe) ramekin or bowl underneath the keel bone. You could also use a ball of foil to hold it up.

For some reason, I am looking forward to this meal more than I have in years!
I have heard people putting veggies in the pan then placing the breast on top to flavor and help keep it upright. Makes good drippings for gravy.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:15 PM   #15
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That's a wonderful idea! Not much drippings from white meat.
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Old 11-23-2011, 03:48 AM   #16
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I would fry the breast till golden, then remove, fry some onion add fresh sage and thyme,add stock some white wine, cranberry jelly, a shot of noilly prat. Put the lid on and simmer till done remove, as it rests strain the stock and thicken.
Plate before taking to table.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:15 AM   #17
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I work in a supermarket, if it was 7 dollars for a 16 pound bird it was a poor quality store brand. The name brand stuff gets more expensive, around 1.50 a pound, and the organic stuff we carry is 2.59 a pound whole bird or breast. You can tell the difference when you look at the organic ones, they look normal...the other turkeys look like selective breeding gone mad.
Very true. If it's in your budget buy a better turkey.

Avoid Jennie-O and ShadybrookFarms if at all possible.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:41 AM   #18
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How do you know if you are getting a "better" turkey?

Over the years I have had turkeys that grew up in good neighborhoods and in bad neighborhoods. They all tasted about the same.

I remember Julia Child commenting that she thought a frozen turkey was a safer bet than a "fresh" turkey because the frozen one was processed under optimal conditions and the so called fresh turkeys were processed far in advance of being used due to the high holiday demand.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:56 AM   #19
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How do you know if you are getting a "better" turkey?

Over the years I have had turkeys that grew up in good neighborhoods and in bad neighborhoods. They all tasted about the same.

I remember Julia Child commenting that she thought a frozen turkey was a safer bet than a "fresh" turkey because the frozen one was processed under optimal conditions and the so called fresh turkeys were processed far in advance of being used due to the high holiday demand.
I like that.

I have been getting the free store brand turkey for years and they taste wonderful. I have had Butterball turkeys and have been disappointed by them.
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Old 11-23-2011, 12:57 PM   #20
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The best turkeys I ever cooked were free-range, fresh, organic ones. But, they were expensive and as the "season" got closer to Christmas, the options for a small turkey were limited to between 20-22 lb. That, is not, IMO, a "small" turkey, but then, my friend whose husband did not specify weight when he ordered theirs, was a bit challenged to figure out how to roast a 48-lb turkey...and, according to her description, "it was as if she had a toddler crammed in her fridge" (first time "turkey" growers often end up with oversized birds the first year). The solution was to take it out to the workshop and cut it up using the band saw...
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