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Old 08-15-2010, 11:21 AM   #1
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ISO 40 clove chicken recipe

I can google with the best of them. I'm not looking for a link to epicurious or allrecipes or anything. I know we had a killer recipe on here and I can't find it. (DANG IT!) So now, what I would love is if someone would post their TNT recipe for me pretty please. I have a little chicken thawing and want to make this for supper tonight. TIA

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Old 08-15-2010, 11:57 AM   #2
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I have tried Ina Garten's recipe but Food Network must have removed it from their archives for now. Many chefs have done this but I tried Ina's and it was soooo yum! I found Ina's recipe on this blog for you:

Alice Q. Foodie: The Best Chicken EVER - 40 Clove Chicken a la Barefoot Contessa

I'm going to my sister's for flank Steak tonight...is there anyone at your table who would want to switch with me? ...i love this recipe!
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Old 08-15-2010, 12:44 PM   #3
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I've always used the James Beard recipe and it's always been stellar. Have not tried the Garten recipe, it sounds terrif but a lot more work.
I'm not near my recipe file, but found the link to the Beard recipe.
http://www.leitesculinaria.com/recip...40_cloves.html
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Old 08-15-2010, 12:53 PM   #4
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Alix, is this the link you were looking for?

ISO 40 cloves of garlic chicken
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Old 08-15-2010, 04:43 PM   #5
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ANDY! It's the one I was looking for! You rock!

Thanks guys, these all look great and really not a lot of work at all. I'm going to do AllenOK's recipe tonight. Will report back. I have a couple other chickens I will want to do this with and I'll try Ina's next and Beard's after.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:37 PM   #6
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Oh my goodness. That was a dish of delicious. I'll be doing that one again. It was easy peasy, and killer good.
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Old 09-12-2010, 06:19 PM   #7
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I'm not sure who posted the original recipe but a great big thanks for doing so. I couldn't find the original thread where I got this so I'm not exactly sure who to credit. I'm preparing it today and it smells fantastic.

I adjusted the recipe a bit to make it easier for me to read and understand but no material changes to the original. Here it is as listed in MacGourmet.


40 Clove Chicken
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recipe By: Adapted from Discuss Cooking

Ingredients:

40 garlic cloves
6 - 8 Split chicken breasts
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 tablespoons Cognac, divided
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
1 tablespoon sage
1 tablespoon rosemary leaves
1 teaspoon thyme
3 whole bay leaf
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
3-4 tablespoons heavy cream

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350.

Browning:
Dry the chicken and season liberally with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat the butter and oil in a large heavy pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. In batches, brown the chicken in the fat, skin side down first, about 3 to 5 minutes on each side. Turn with tongs or a spatula; you don't want to pierce the skin with a fork.

Deglaze:
Remove the chicken to a plate and add all of the garlic cloves to the pot. Lower the heat and saute for 5 to 10 minutes, turning often, until evenly browned. Add 2 tablespoons of the Cognac and all of the wine, raise the heat to bring to a boil, and scrape the brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Boil for one minute.

Bake:
Return the chicken to the pot and sprinkle with the herbs. Tuck the bay leaves in with the chicken pieces, cover and braise in the oven for about 45 minutes, until the chicken is extremely tender.

Crisp Chicken:
Using tongs, remove the chicken to a rimmed baking sheet. (Be careful, it might fall apart.) and turn the oven up to broil. Broil chicken for 3 - 5 minutes until golden brown and crispy.

Sauce:
Place the dutch oven on the stove and raise the heat to high. Remove half a cup of the liquid and whisk in the flour, then whisk it back into the sauce in the pot. When the mixture boils, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of Cognac and boil until it starts to thicken. Whisk the cream, salt and pepper into the sauce. When the sauce and chicken are ready - place the chicken on a plate and pour the sauce over. Pass additional sauce on the side.

Notes:

Beringer's 2009 California Chardonay
Hennesy VS Cognac
HEB - 8 oz tub of fresh whole peeled garlic

.40
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Old 09-12-2010, 07:57 PM   #8
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Quick couple of pics

Rich and tangy sauce...


Chicken after final step of crisping under the broiler.


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Old 09-12-2010, 08:59 PM   #9
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Next time you make it, try tucking in some quartered (canned or frozen) artichoke hearts between and on top of the cooking chicken.

Along with the garlic, it adds a fantastic new dimension to the classic dish. I have to do this again, and soon!

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Old 09-12-2010, 10:03 PM   #10
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Provençal Chicken in the Pot

I thought I had posted this recipe before. It sounds complicated, but it isn't. and the leftovers make a whole nother meal!

Provençal Chicken in the Pot


The French would call this dish "Le Plat Unique," because it is a whole meal in one pot. Although its execution is realistic for a twelve-year-old, the results are impressive enough for even your most discriminating guests. And, to top it off, it's incredibly low in fat because the chicken steams atop the garlic, herbs and liquid.

makes 4 to 6+ servings -- depends on what else you're serving, and how hungry your guests are

1 4-pound frying chicken
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Bouquet garni (include thyme, parsley stems, rosemary, marjoram, bay leaf)
1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
40 unpeeled cloves of garlic
Bed of fresh herbs for the pot (should include: 1 bay leaf, the leafy top of a whole bunch of celery, a whole bunch of flat-leaf parsley, several sprigs each of marjoram, rosemary, sage and thyme -- and summer savory and lavender greens, if you can find them)
1 cup dry white wine
12 small all-purpose potatoes (about the size of a silver dollar)
12 - 16 small white onions
4 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks
1 pound fresh peas, shelled (or 1 10-ounce package frozen)
2 tablespoons flour and 1 tablespoon water paste to seal the lid
Crôutes for serving

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Make a mixture of salt and pepper in a small bowl. Use this to generously season the interior and exterior of a 4-pound fryer. Tie a bouquet garni together with string and put it inside.
2. Pour 1 cup of olive oil into a large (about 9 quarts) Dutch oven with a lid. Add the bed of herbs and all of the garlic.
3. Set the prepared chicken on this bed and turn it over and over in the already perfumed oil. Add the dry white wine. Scatter the vegetables around on top of the bed of herbs.
4. Then with all the oil, wine and aromatics below and the chicken and vegetables on top, put the lid on and seal it “hermetically” with a band of flour and water paste. Bake 1 hour and 30 minutes in the preheated oven.
5. Remove from oven and allow the Dutch oven to sit undisturbed for 15 to 20 minutes. Do not lift the lid!
6. In preparation for serving, put a small serving bowl (for the garlic) and a slotted spoon on the table. A pair of poultry shears is the easiest tool to use for cutting the hot chicken into serving pieces. A sturdy wooden spoon will help you hold the chicken still for cutting without burning your fingers.
7. Carry the Dutch oven to the table and lift off the lid at the moment of serving, and take a deep breath. The aroma is incredible!
8. Serve with toasted slices of bread, which each diner will spread with the incomparable garlic purée. Don't be surprised. The chicken will not be browned.

Teacher’s Tip: When you have eaten all the chicken, vegetables and garlic, you will find yourself with a large pot of herbs and a chickeny, garlicky wine-flavored stock. You can make a wonderful soup the next day (or several days hence) using this as a base. Here's how:

Provençal Herbed Bean and Pasta Soup


1. Remove the herbs and discard them. Pour the wine/olive oil stock into a storage container, cover tightly and refrigerate overnight. When you are ready to make the soup, remove most of the oil that has risen to the top. Also overnight, soak 1 pound of small white beans in enough cold water to cover by 2 inches. The next day, drain the beans and put them back in the pot with enough water to cover by 2 inches, 6 black peppercorns and 1 bay leaf. Bring the beans to a boil and simmer for about 1 hour, until the beans are not quite tender. Drain the beans and reserve the water.
2. Return the beans to the pot and now add the reserved wine/olive oil stock from the chicken to the beans. Also add several fresh sprigs of the same herbs you used in last night's pot, and at least five of the following:
1/2 pound lima beans or fava beans, shelled and peeled
6 potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 3/4-inch chunks
1/2 pound green beans, ends trimmed
5 carrots, peeled and cut into 3/4-inch chunks
5 red onions, peeled and thickly sliced
5 zucchini, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
3 white turnips, cut into 3/4-inch chunks
2 leeks, well washed, dried and sliced

Teacher's Tips: 1. The more of the above ingredients you add to your soup, the more delicious it will be.
2. Add 1 teaspoon sea salt and stir the mixture. Bring the soup to a boil and simmer for 40 to 50 minutes more. Some tubular pasta added during the last 15 minutes of cooking will add substance to this second one-dish meal. Serve the soup in large bowls with freshly grated Parmesan cheese on top and crusty bread on the side.
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