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Old 06-05-2006, 09:47 PM   #11
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Jenny,
The taste of the sauce is a very sweet fruit taste (nothing like sweet and sour sauce) and it has Thai peppers in it. You taste the sweetness of the it and the heat comes after. The chicken, of course, is simply breaded with flour and corn starch and deep fried. I will mess with different types of sauces and try to come up with it. BTW, I called the grocer where I buy this chicken from and they told me it's called General Tso chicken.
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Old 06-28-2006, 10:03 PM   #12
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breaded spicy/sweet chicken

I'm looking for what sounds very close to Dina's description. In a Chinese restaurant in my city I go to, they call it:

Twice-cooked chicken

It's basically breaded fried chicken. Not soggy, not overly crunchy, just perfect. The dish comes with NO veggies. The sauce is dark brown, sweet, and spicy. The chiles I assume are Chinese as it's a chinese restaurant. They're dried, small (1-2"), thin, and red. Could be Mexican "Tree chiles" though...(they look very similar.)

Anyways, of course the sauce is the secret. I assume there's sugar, as it's quite sweet. A chinese co-worker said probably brown sugar. I don't know about sesame oil , usually I can detect that, at least there's no strong taste of that in this dish. Could be though... What else, who knows... Maybe some sherry/rice wine? as the sauce (to my taste buds) is very rich. But it's a little salty too, but not that much. I guess I could experiment, but also was hoping to find it on the internet. I'm just an amateur home chef guy, but have made my share of complicated dishes at home over the years....so based on my experiences that was my amateur description of the flavors.
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Old 06-28-2006, 11:34 PM   #13
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Fil,
It is General Tso chicken-just as you describe it too. I've prepared it twice now and it is marvelous! You'd need to get the Thai peppers or dried ones. Let me know if you want the recipe and I'll post it or PM it to you.
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Old 06-30-2006, 11:02 PM   #14
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Oh my it does sound like General Tso's and I would be interested in the recipe too if you don't mind. I LOVE general Tso's and so does my usually picky 7 year old. I've tried a few recipes but they are never even close. One had me using maple syrup and it was kinda good but not quite it.
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Old 07-01-2006, 03:18 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Spoken like a true transplant... New England gets no respect...
Not on topic, but I think it needs to be here.

Goodweed's idea of New England Chicken, in fact I'm going to create this recipe for you right here, right now, in honor of the New Englanders on this site.

Ingredients:
1 Large Roasting Chicken
1 large yellow Onion, cut coarsely
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/2 cup cooked wild rice
1/2 cup slivered almonds
salt
pepper
1 tbs. Rubbed Sage
1 tsp. finely-ground Black Pepper
8 oz. sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup melted butter
1/8 cup Maple Syrup.

Combine the rice, almonds, sage salt and pepper. Saute the mushrooms in butter until just cooked. Add the onions and sweat until soft and sweet. Mix in with the rice and stuff.

Soften the butter and mix with the syrup. Fire up the charcoal or gas grill. If using charcoal, configure in two piles with room for a drip pan between them. Stuff the bird with the rice and stuff. Wipe the chicken clean with a damp paper towel. Dry the bird with more paper towels. Place sticks of maple into the fire to create smoke.

Place the bird over the drip pan and baste with the syrup/butter. Cover and close vents to the half open position. Cook for 12 minutes per pound, basting every ten minutes or so with the syrup/butter. Check with a meat thermometer. Remove when the temp. reads 155 F.

Serve with acorn squash or sweet potatoes and cornbread.

Now that yells New England loud and clear.

To make it even better, add clams, scallops, or any of the other seafood for which the area is famous, to the stuffing.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-01-2006, 03:18 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Spoken like a true transplant... New England gets no respect...
Not on topic, but I think it needs to be here.

Goodweed's idea of New England Chicken, in fact I'm going to create this recipe for you right here, right now, in honor of the New Englanders on this site.

Ingredients:
1 Large Roasting Chicken
1 large yellow Onion, cut coarsely
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/2 cup cooked wild rice
1/2 cup slivered almonds
salt
pepper
1 tbs. Rubbed Sage
1 tsp. finely-ground Black Pepper
8 oz. sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup melted butter
1/8 cup Maple Syrup.

Combine the rice, almonds, sage salt and pepper. Saute the mushrooms in butter until just cooked. Add the onions and sweat until soft and sweet. Mix in with the rice and stuff.

Soften the butter and mix with the syrup. Fire up the charcoal or gas grill. If using charcoal, configure in two piles with room for a drip pan between them. Stuff the bird with the rice and stuff. Wipe the chicken clean with a damp paper towel. Dry the bird with more paper towels. Place sticks of maple into the fire to create smoke.

Place the bird over the drip pan and baste with the syrup/butter. Cover and close vents to the half open position. Cook for 12 minutes per pound, basting every ten minutes or so with the syrup/butter. Check with a meat thermometer. Remove when the temp. reads 155 F.

Serve with acorn squash or sweet potatoes and cornbread.

Now that yells New England loud and clear.

To make it even better, add clams, scallops, or any of the other seafood for which the area is famous, to the stuffing.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-01-2006, 10:12 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
Not on topic, but I think it needs to be here.

Goodweed's idea of New England Chicken, in fact I'm going to create this recipe for you right here, right now, in honor of the New Englanders on this site.

Ingredients:
1 Large Roasting Chicken
1 large yellow Onion, cut coarsely
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/2 cup cooked wild rice
1/2 cup slivered almonds
salt
pepper
1 tbs. Rubbed Sage
1 tsp. finely-ground Black Pepper
8 oz. sliced mushrooms
1/2 cup melted butter
1/8 cup Maple Syrup.

Combine the rice, almonds, sage salt and pepper. Saute the mushrooms in butter until just cooked. Add the onions and sweat until soft and sweet. Mix in with the rice and stuff.

Soften the butter and mix with the syrup. Fire up the charcoal or gas grill. If using charcoal, configure in two piles with room for a drip pan between them. Stuff the bird with the rice and stuff. Wipe the chicken clean with a damp paper towel. Dry the bird with more paper towels. Place sticks of maple into the fire to create smoke.

Place the bird over the drip pan and baste with the syrup/butter. Cover and close vents to the half open position. Cook for 12 minutes per pound, basting every ten minutes or so with the syrup/butter. Check with a meat thermometer. Remove when the temp. reads 155 F.

Serve with acorn squash or sweet potatoes and cornbread.

Now that yells New England loud and clear.

To make it even better, add clams, scallops, or any of the other seafood for which the area is famous, to the stuffing.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

I appreciate the thought, Goodweed. I'll put this at the top of the list of recipes to make next.

However, I'll stick to the squash and skip the sweet potatoes (not big in New England).
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Old 07-02-2006, 01:38 PM   #18
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I have heard that the chicken can be frozen after the first frying. This would sure make it easier and the house wouldn't smell like oil. I love General Tso's and want to make it for my son when/if he visits this summer. Has anyone ever frozen the chicken and then finished the dish later?
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Old 07-02-2006, 02:24 PM   #19
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hi! this is my first post here. i love general tso chicken as well.

iron chef makes a very tasty general tso sauce that you can find in your grocery store. even my friend that is not into 'prefab' food just loves this stuff.

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Old 07-04-2006, 12:50 PM   #20
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Thanks Dina, I found your posted tweaked recipe, on this link: http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ipe-22501.html

I'll give it a try, but I have to say I've never noticed any (obvious) peanut, ginger, vinegar, or orange juice (citrus flavor) in the recipe at my restaurant. I'll probably definitely leave out peanut due to my concern about nut allergies/aflatoxins. Also, next time I go to the restaurant, I'll see if General Tso's chicken is on their menu. If it is, I'm guessing that's a unique recipe. Maybe I'll order Tso's just to compare.
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