"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-01-2016, 01:37 PM   #21
Head Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 1,882
Super Juicy Turkey Baked In Cheesecloth And White Wine | Serena Bakes Simply From Scratch this way is how I crisp skins and it always,
__________________

__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:43 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
My main worry is that my turkey is too lean, I think I am going to brine it 12 hours, and add some melted butter to the brine, rather than basting, inject that right into the meat. I have a hypodermic injector meat thing rig.TBS
You might add butter to the injection, but I've never seen any added to a brine? I would think the butter would solidify when you put the turkey in the fridge. For smoking, you usually do one or the other. I brine my turkey for smoking. Some pure maple syrup goes in the brine and I make a finishing glaze with it also.
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:47 PM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Yeah, Dragnlaw, I think I will do it breast down, and use a aluminium foil shield.

Got Garlic, I have to disagree, and this is I guess a reason we have forums, I don't like a crispy skin. I kind of find the skin icky, and try for an overall moist bird.

I absolutely understand the crisp skin goals for a turkey. I go a different way.

My main worry is that my turkey is too lean, I think I am going to brine it 12 hours, and add some melted butter to the brine, rather than basting, inject that right into the meat. I have a hypodermic injector meat thing rig.

I'm just worried that this free range fresh turkey will not have enough fat in it. I think I am just being dumb, and should trust the bird.
That's fine - it's a matter of taste. I love crispy skin If you have different goals, then by all means use a different method.

The foil will prevent the skin from browning too fast, but again, it won't keep moisture in the meat. It doesn't work that way.

Melted butter in the brine? Why? Fat and water don't mix without some kind of emulsifier; it will just float to the top and solidify when it's refrigerated.

To avoid dry meat, just avoid overcooking.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:51 PM   #24
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,290
For those that have a hard time determining when the turkey is done, a simple solution is to add raw popcorn to your stuffing!
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 02:23 PM   #25
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
To avoid dry meat, just avoid overcooking.
I think that is the solution. My thing is I am trying to find tricks to prevent that, and overall, better just to keep an eye on the cooking and not overdo it, sounds good.

TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 02:25 PM   #26
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Some pure maple syrup goes in the brine and I make a finishing glaze with it also.
I am from Vermont, and never ever dissuade maple syrup in a recipe.

Brine and glaze, I approve
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 02:37 PM   #27
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I think that is the solution. My thing is I am trying to find tricks to prevent that, and overall, better just to keep an eye on the cooking and not overdo it, sounds good.

TBS
An instant read thermometer is the best tool to help prevent overcooking. Take it out when it's about 10 degrees below your target temperature. Carry-over cooking will take it the rest of the way.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 02:59 PM   #28
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,552
free-range

I raised my own turkeys for a couple of years (and chickens). I would not worry about them being too lean. Mine were free range, meaning they had a large pen to run around in - they were closed up every night (raccoons & coyotes).

I never did butcher my own turkeys, just the chickens usually. One year when picking up the dressed turkeys the guy asked me if they were free-range.

Evidently a couple had gotten out of their cage and he had a heck of a time rounding them up. His comment was that they were "very athletic".

Meat on fowl is not marbled. The fat is strictly between the skin and muscle. You can always add extra under the skin if you are really worried. It is common practice with store bought chickens.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 04:36 PM   #29
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 9,996
Hi, Fox. I'm glad you started this thread, it's definitely not too early to start thinking about Thanksgiving dinner. You've been given some very good advice here!

I've already started using up fridge leftovers, re-arranging, and making plenty of space in the fridge for new Thanksgiving leftovers. Nothing worse than trying to jam all those lovely leftovers in an already crowded fridge.

Just to add a few more tips I've learned over the decades - take your turkey out of the fridge at least a couple of hours ahead of roasting, to help take the chill off. Also, make as many of your sides as you can a day or two ahead of time. Mashed potatoes and stuffing will be fine in the fridge for a couple of days, just stirred up, re-checked for seasoning, and reheated the day of your dinner. Veggies can be prepped ahead of time, pickle and olive trays assembled and refrigerated....and as for gravy, there is almost never enough for my family so I almost always buy a couple of turkey wings a few days before and roast them for extra make ahead gravy.

I have limited counter space, so I make sure I have a sink full of hot soapy water to clean as I go, and make sure the dishwasher is completely empty Thanksgiving day. With a little planning and forethought, it IS possible to get Thanksgiving dinner on the table (or set it up on the countertops as a buffet type meal) with little to no dirty dishes cluttering up space. For me, that takes a tremendous amount of stress off and I can concentrate on the turkey and visit with family.

And speaking of stress...above all, just do the best you can with your bird, make no apologies, and enjoy the day with family and friends. That's really what it's all about.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 04:55 PM   #30
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 9,996
Oh, and as far as flipping the turkey - I never do that, I think it's dangerous. My grandmothers never did, and I guess I've adopted their methods as my standard. The way it goes into the oven is the way it comes out. I don't baste, either. Every time the oven door is opened, heat is lost and it just takes longer to get back up to temp. Plus, I like crispy skin. JMO.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 05:34 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
Oh, and as far as flipping the turkey - I never do that, I think it's dangerous. My grandmothers never did, and I guess I've adopted their methods as my standard. The way it goes into the oven is the way it comes out. I don't baste, either. Every time the oven door is opened, heat is lost and it just takes longer to get back up to temp. Plus, I like crispy skin. JMO.
Same here. No flipping, no basting. And good call about making things in advance; cranberry sauce or relish can even be made the weekend before, and bread or rolls a couple weeks before, frozen, then thawed the day before and reheated the day of.

When I had a large crowd coming, the day before, I set the table and got out all the serving dishes and utensils and set them up in the dining room with stickies identifying what would be served in each (I have a radiator and a window seat, so I can spread things out). This way, you can ask people to help fill them at serving time without having to remember details at the end. And I used my outdoor grill as an extra oven to keep sides warm till serving time.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 05:45 PM   #32
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
And speaking of stress...above all, just do the best you can with your bird, make no apologies, and enjoy the day with family and friends. That's really what it's all about.
Best advice I've heard. I admit, have been kind of stressing out about doing the Big Dinner at my place, but it is only gonna be me, wife, father in law and my Mom. it is basically a four person dinner party.

And I have a good turkey on reserve. I shopped several local farms to find this bird.

Gonna go with GotGarlic's plan, low and slow. 300 degrees and long baking. Going to make a nice sourdough bread ahead of time, with some apples, that and some herbs will make a stuffing. Maybe some raisins in that. Take off the fat to make a gravy, and we will be rather good. I'm going off a medieval goose stuffing recipe, I'll post it when I get it together. Still haven't decided how to spice it.

We aren't starting from frozen, so we have a bit of room. Get everything up to 165 degrees, we are fine.

I am kind of thinking about this too early, but it is my first year doing the Big Dinner, at my home.

TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 05:58 PM   #33
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Here's another idea. I have a tendency to forget about lunch on Thanksgiving, and I have to eat in the middle of the day, so last year, I made sure to have some munchies available - and I made a pitcher of apple sangria Once everything was tooling along and I had a minute to sit down, I fixed myself a little plate and a glass of sangria and relaxed on the porch for a few minutes. Definitely planning to do this again.

https://smittenkitchen.com/2015/11/apple-cider-sangria/
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1478037509674.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	68.3 KB
ID:	25619  
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 06:20 PM   #34
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
I don't think I'd ever call apple sangria a bad thing.

My family drinks, for some reason, bloody marys before thanksgiving dinner.

I think it started in the fifties, the men would drink bloody marys and watch football while the women were in the kitchen.
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 08:49 PM   #35
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,552
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
the day before, I set the table and got out all the serving dishes and utensils and set them up in the dining room with stickies identifying what would be served in each
LOL - I do the same and this reminds me of the year I was having 26 people for Christmas dinner. We would be eating buffet style. My sons girlfriend thought it would be funny to move all my labels around. I freaked right out! It is funny now but at the time it wasn't! We all laugh about that still.

I made quite a few of the sides about 2 weeks in advance and froze them. Mash Potatoes, Creamed Carrots & Sweet Potatoes, and a Beet & Pear puree. All super delish. The Brussels & Chestnuts had to do them fresh - but I ruined it somehow... still tasted good but looked a disaster . Can't even remember what else we had, condiments galore and salads.

Aside from all the pies for dessert, my SIL didn't tell me she had spilled the raspberry sauce being kept warm in the oven for the crepes. A gas stove and the sauce slipped right under the bottom pan - what a mess, she didn't realize it was all down there. Thought she had gotten it all wiped up.

Ahhh the memories, sure makes you smile.. Foxy - know you will have good memories from your big dinner! and no, it is never too early to plan and work on a menu.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 09:25 PM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Cheryl, for extra space in the kitchen, take your cutting board and place it across an open drawer that will be little needed and put the cutting board across it. And if you have a double sink, cover one of the sinks with a large board also. Each spot give you more room for one big item or two or three small items.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 10:38 PM   #37
Senior Cook
 
Sue Lau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: USA,Ohio
Posts: 135
My best tip is to not bake the turkey until it gets that deep golden skin color you see in magazines.
Just as an FYI I have it on good authority from food stylists- they get that color by making a food spray of kitchen bouquet (caramel coloring) mixed with corn syrup and water and spraying it on with a mister.
What you see in the magazines is all very fake.
In fact, bowls of ice cream in the summer magazines are probably mashed potatoes mixed with chocolate. It doesn't melt. LOL
I heard the best way to photograph sour cream is to use elmer's glue as it has a better color.
And WD-40 gives a nice moist look.
Point being, they photograph each subject for about an hour and NOBODY eats it. Into the trash it goes.
I bet you never look at a food magazine the same way again. ;)
__________________
There's no such thing as a little garlic.
Sue Lau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:36 PM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by mouse View Post
My best tip is to not bake the turkey until it gets that deep golden skin color you see in magazines...
I bet you never look at a food magazine the same way again. ;)
This is not new information for many of us As you say, the goal of food stylists is not to make a tasty dish; it's to make it look pretty for the pictures. That doesn't mean making a juicy turkey with a crispy skin can't be done. I've done it many times.

You might want to take a look at the article I posted earlier. There are several steps people can take to get browned, crispy skin without spraying it with anything.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 07:54 AM   #39
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,359
I've done a hundred turkey dinners over the years for catering...to make it easier, I cook the turkey a day ahead, or, that morning. I pull the bird when it is just barely done because I will be reheating the meat later. Let it cool enough to handle it, then debone and slice. Dark meat at one end and white at the other. Place all of your meat in a roasting pan and cover lightly with foil. Bones can go straight into a stock pot with neck and heart and boil. I use some of this cool stock later to add about a half inch to my turkey meat so it stays moist when I reheat it the next day. I also make the gravy using the pan drippings and fresh stock. I make the dressing separately using bits of neck meat, stock, seasoning and sauteed onions and celery. It gets packed in a large pan and covered also.

These three main items are done. So, if carving in front of everybody isn't important you just have to reheat gently the next day. I go about 300 for 45 minutes or so. You just have to worry about your veg, salad, etc...If the dressing gets a bit dry, I just add some gravy and give it a good stir to get it moist...

It certainly isn't traditional, but a heck of a lot easier...
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 10:14 AM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 23,589
Boom.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1478096092886.jpg
Views:	47
Size:	50.2 KB
ID:	25627  
__________________

__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other, turkey

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×