"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-01-2016, 11:38 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 21,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I'll probably do another smoked bird. Whether we have a roasted one is undecided. We do dressing instead of stuffing. Just remember, the best part of T-Day is the after dinner, Dagwood style turkey sandwich!
Craig, you must know my daughter. Did I hear you say "turkey sandwiches?" I have known her to do a turkey in the middle of a hot summer day, just so she can have turkey sandwiches. She removes the breasts and then gives the carcass to me for soup. he just can't wait until November or December rolls around. That baby goes into the freezer to wait for a cool day. S
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 11:47 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,964
No, this is the special T-Day sandwich, piled high with turkey, stuffing/dressing and cranberry sauce/relish/jelly. The bread is slathered with mayo.
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:04 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,217
We have had more than one thread about turkey cooking for the T day.
I am a big proponent of basting. Even make some broth/soup just for that. However, no matter how much basting you do, if it's overcooked, it's overcooked. So, mind the cooking temps. Brining is a good idea. Lucky me kosher chicken goes thru salting and soaking, so I do not have to brine. Personally, I like to season turkey night or even day before, not sure if it really helps seasoning to penetrate thru the meat, but I am sure I talked myself into believing that. Good luck.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:37 PM   #14
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
I both agree and dis-agree with a lot here. I believe in basting and tenting with foil. Other than my early years of first trying to cook turkey - I've never had any dry meat.

Rub and season well with butter, s&p and thn which ever seasonings you prefer, such as sage and/or thyme. I baste with the juice from the bottom - a fantastic mix of wine, homemade chicken broth, or a broth made from extra store bought turkey wings. Keep extra broth on the counter to add to the pan should it be needed.

I've pretty much stopped stuffing the turkeys. Usually stuff them with chunks of onions, apples, celery, garlic etc. This gets mashed into the gravy after. The stuffing I either cook in a casserole dish or wrap in foil - foil packets can fit into amazing spaces in your oven. Also remember, the more you need in the oven the more you need to adjust your timing.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:38 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 21,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Cut brining to 12 hours, increase cooking time at a lower temp, 300 and might be a long cooking, cut cooking at 165 degrees and let sit for 20 minutes.

thoughts?
I do mine at 325°F.

There are two problems with basting: 1) it doesn't penetrate the skin, so it doesn't get into the meat and 2) wetting the skin slows down browning. It has to evaporate before browning can happen, and, next to juicy meat, crispy skin is my major goal for roasted poultry.

From The Food Lab's Definitive Guide to Buying, Prepping, Cooking, and Carving Your Holiday Turkey

Quote:
Q: Does rubbing butter, oil, or a dry rub on my turkey affect the way it cooks?

Yes, though contrary to what some sources claim, oil, butter, and/or aromatics are nothing more than a surface treatment—they don't penetrate far beyond the skin (even if applied directly to the meat underneath. I generally do nothing more than rub my turkey skin with a little oil and season with salt and pepper, though there are other things to consider:

Going naked is the easiest, and will give you the crispest skin, particularly if you let the turkey air-dry overnight in the fridge. Do not let a turkey dry out for more than one night or it ill turn leathery and tough instead of crisp.

Spice rubs can add flavor to skin. For best results, combine them with your dry-brine and rub them on the day before. Here's a great guide to making a balanced rub!

Oil will get you a more even golden-brown color, as it helps distribute heat from air in the oven more evenly. It also provides a good surface for salt and pepper to stick to while helping prevent skin from turning leathery.

Butter or herb-butter will add lots of flavor to your skin but it'll also greatly reduce its crispness. Butter is about 18% water. It cools down the skin as it evaporates off. Milk proteins present in butter also brown on their own, so turkey skin rubbed with butter will have a spottier appearance than one rubbed in oil. Some people prefer this appearance.

Q: Should I baste my turkey as it cooks?

Basting will not add moisture to meat, but it can help a turkey cook faster if you are behind schedule. Basting will also re-deposit dripped proteins and aromatic compounds onto the surface of the turkey, which can add flavor but also creates uneven browning. Basted birds tend to have a streaky-skinned appearance.

Q: Any other tips for getting extra-crisp skin?

Yes! Combine your salt rub with a little baking powder before rubbing it into the turkey and letting it rest overnight. That's right, baking powder. It's a trick I discovered while working on my recipe for Really Good Oven-Fried Buffalo Wings a few years ago. Baking powder mixes with the juices on the surface of the turkey skin and reacts, forming microscopic bubbles. These bubbles then crisp up, adding extra surface area and crunch to your turkey as it bakes. Baking powder's slightly alkaline pH also promotes better browning and more efficient breakdown of proteins in the turkey skin.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:50 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 21,448
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
No, this is the special T-Day sandwich, piled high with turkey, stuffing/dressing and cranberry sauce/relish/jelly. The bread is slathered with mayo.
You have my mouth watering!!!
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:50 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
Carving at the Table

As to carving at the table - I know it looks wonderfully Norman Rockwell"ie" but in truth?...
.. By the time the last person receives his plate, the first person is asking for seconds and the carver never gets to eat.

Should everyone wait till all is served before 'digging in'? Well, their food is going to be pretty damn cold. In 'days of yore' waiting for everyone to be served is from having a servant standing behind you with the next plate - hello Downton Abbey!
AND heated plates are mandatory. Most of my dinner guests are no longer surprised when dinner is served on heated plates.

Depending on how many are at the table, I will do platters and bowls for both ends of the table. My sister often entertains up to 24 adults for either Thanksgiving or Christmas - almost everything is cooked a day or two ahead and wrapped well in foil - including the turkey!!! You would never know when it comes to the table.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 12:53 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 1,858
If I do turkey, I remove the back bone and flatten it out and it cooks really fast, becomes moist and lovely.
__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:08 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 2,938
Upside down!

I almost forgot!

Some start their turkey or large chickens breast side down. For really large and long cooking birds, I quite like this. I have done it a couple of times and been quite happy with it. Many think the breast meat stays moister this way.

Cook the bird on its breasts until ready to brown the skin. Flip it over (careful here - I've ruined a couple of shirts with splashing) breast side up and keep basting to help with the browning and crisping up of the skin.

When all is said and done you will just have to find out which formula works for you. I have eaten turkey done in completely different ways and they have always been moist. (well, I can think of a few failures.. )
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2016, 01:33 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Yeah, Dragnlaw, I think I will do it breast down, and use a aluminium foil shield.

Got Garlic, I have to disagree, and this is I guess a reason we have forums, I don't like a crispy skin. I kind of find the skin icky, and try for an overall moist bird.

I absolutely understand the crisp skin goals for a turkey. I go a different way.

My main worry is that my turkey is too lean, I think I am going to brine it 12 hours, and add some melted butter to the brine, rather than basting, inject that right into the meat. I have a hypodermic injector meat thing rig.

I'm just worried that this free range fresh turkey will not have enough fat in it. I think I am just being dumb, and should trust the bird.

TBS
__________________

__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other, turkey

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.