"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-24-2015, 12:12 AM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I put 3 thighs and 3 wings and 3 drumsticks in a bowl and will soak them overnight, then drain and freeze them. This way I don't have to wait overnight if I want spur of the moment fried chicken. It also helps in that I can now try 2 or 3 methods of battering, frying while learning.

One site mentioned putting a splash of buttermilk to the flour mix to firm it up so it's not so powdery. That sounds logical. Also, I'll probably let the chicken set awhile on a cookie sheet after dipping and flouring. Some say this is key. I'll probably try Dixie Fry mix one time, Golden Dipt one time and my own powder mix from scratch one time. I'll start off high temp, then reduce the oil to a less splattering temp to let it slowly oil boil. Some suggest to finish baking in the oven at 350F for about 20 minutes to keep the skin from overcooking and yet cook the inside thoroughly. They say this also causes any excess oil to drain out of the chicken. Sounds good to me. I'll look to see if they sell a glass top for my chef Emeril 10" CI pan as it seems important to cover while frying, especially at the lower oil temp. I have a splatter screen for the first part of the frying at high temp.

I may have to go thru some not so great batches to get to where it comes out great and which I can repeat with consistency (frying temps, time cooking, battering etc.). Good thing chicken is inexpensive.
Well, it appears that you have been busy reading. Good for you. And you have a plan in place. Go for it and keep us apprised of how you are doing with each effort.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 12:14 AM   #32
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,702
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Well, it appears that you have been busy reading.
Yes. It was almost information overload.
__________________

__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 11:19 AM   #33
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 482
The number one problem newbies have frying/cooking pretty much everything is they use too high a heat setting.
For fried chicken have the chicken pieces at room temperature. Have the oil just hot enough to fry small batches at a time. Cooking takes time to get things right.
__________________
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 11:29 AM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,285
New breeds of chickens have been developed. They are market size at 8 weeks. A friend raises meat birds. He kept one until it was 18 weeks. Dressed, it was just under 10 lb.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 12:11 AM   #35
Head Chef
 
Caslon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Inside the fridge
Posts: 1,702
OK...my first attempt at pan frying chicken didn't come out as well as I thought it would. I had the oil at about 340F and placed the Dixie Fry coated wing and leg in the oil. I let it roil boil for 5 minutes on one side, but upon turning it over, it was already dark and burnt on that side. I think 5 minutes on that one side was too long. Anyways, I flipped the pieces over and let it fry for only 2 or 3 minutes to avoid burning it. Then I lowered the temp and let it cook for another 15 minutes. I then set it on a rack and into a 350F oven to let it finish cooking the inside. The meat came out ok, but the coating was hopelessly ruined.

What I'll do next time. I'll keep the oil temp at 350F and let it splatter fry for only 2 minutes max per side, to keep it looking golden brown, not burnt brown. Then I'll move the skillet off the burner for a minute and let the oil cool down, then return it to the burner and cook at a reduced temp for awhile, then place it in a 350F oven to cook the inside and drain out any excess oil. Still learning !!!
__________________
Caslon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 10:34 AM   #36
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,830
I never finished my fried chicken in the oven; I did the whole thing on the stovetop. Your oil is too hot. You should be able to brown it more slowly, 10 minutes or so per side, to render out the fat under the skin and cook the meat gently. If you're using a lid, that will increase the temperature inside the pan as well, like taxlady said.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2015, 11:51 AM   #37
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
I made two different seasoned coating recipes, to see which I liked better. I have to say that they were tied, but tasted much different from each other. This was back in 2009. I've given this recipe to many, and all enjoyed them, with one man stating that the first recipe is the only fried chicken he will make.

I might seem to be boasting, but really, I used trial and error to come up with the seasonings, my mother-In-Law's cooking technique, and a bit of luck to create this chicken, and it's very good. I just want to share a very good recipe, and technique with everyone who likes good chicken. Give both of these recipes a try.

Recipe 1: The Chief's Bulldog Chicken
This recipe has significant thought put into the seasonings. So here goes. How do I describe this one? It is soooo good, but dramatically different than the second recipe. The coating doesn't have that mild crunch like the second one does, but isn't sloppy or gooey either. It's a proper coating. But the flavor is much more intense. If your after great chicken meat flavor, then opt for the recipe number two. If you want intense, great flavor, opt for recipe number one. I can't really decide which one I like better. This recipe is bold and literally takes over your senses. It is a spicy, but not pepper hot coating. The flavor is well balanced, and is what you think of when you think chicken while watching the super bowl. I would say that it would rival hot wings for popularity as a snacking food. But you'd better have something to wash it down. I would put this up against anybody's chicken. Good thing this isn't a competition.

Recipe number 2: The Chief's mildly Crunchy Chicken Delight

Oh wow. The coating is very light, slightly crispy, and the chicken is hot, almost to hot to handle. But it is possibly the most tender chicken I have ever made. The flavor is mildly savory, with a hint of sweet undertones, and just enough pepper to warm your mouth, almost without being able to be detected. But it does enhance the flavor. The coating doesn't hide the chicken meat flavor, but rather, compliments it. I really like this batch. This one is a keeper. Wait, I need another bite. I'm not kidding. This is the most tender chicken I have ever eaten, let alone made. And it's just grocery store chicken, pre-cut and packaged. It's very moist, without being sloppy, and my hands aren't coming away greasy. The after taste is mild, but lingers. It's pleasant. This is good chicken! Delicate but wonderful flavor.

Ok. so here are the recipes.

Recipe 1: I'm going to name this one – Chief’s Bull Dog Chicken
Preheat the oven to 375' F.
In a bowl, combine the following with a wire whisk.
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp. kosher salt
1/2 tsp. granulated garlic powder
1/8 tsp. powdered ginger
1/2 tsp. marjoram
1/4 tsp. rubbed sage
1/4 tsp. ground thyme
1/2 tsp. black pepper
1/4 tsp. turmeric
1/8 tsp. red pepper
1 dash Chinese 5-spice powder
1/8 tsp. celery seed
1/4 tsp. granulated onion powder
1 tsp. chili powder
In a separate bowl, make an egg-wash from 1 large egg whisked with 1/4 cup water.

Preheat your oven to 375' F. Preheat 2 inches of oil in a frying pan until fragrant. Turn heat to medium flame.

Skin the chicken (or leave the skin on if you like) and dredge in seasoned flour. Dip in the egg-wash, and then again in the seasoned flour. Shake excess coating from the chicken and place in hot oil. Don't crown the pan. Fry on each side for 2 minutes. Remove the chicken to a foil-lined pan and place into the oven. Bake for 20 minutes. Serve immediately.

Recipe Number 2: So good chicken!
Preheat oven to 375' F. Preheat cooking oil in a heavy frying pan.
Again, whisk the following ingredients into a bowl:
1/2 cup flour
1/4 cup uncooked farina (cream of wheat)
1 1/2 tsp. Kosher salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp granulated garlic
1/8 tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. red pepper
1/8 tsp. ground cumin
Egg-wash
Follow the same cooking technique as in recipe number 1.


Ok. So while the first recipe is a bold statement, the second is a more delicate, but crispy celebration for your taste buds. Neither is your grandma's fried chicken. This is pure Chief Longwind stuff.
try both recipes. If you don't, you'll be cheating yourselves. You can tell your family that you created them if you want. I don't care.

Tip, you can season Panko Breadcrumbs for the 2nd coating, instead of using flour. This will give you a more crisp coating with the same flavor profile. Serve with steamed corn on the cob, sweet potatoes, and some freshly steamed green beans. Make a butter sauce to go over the green beans. Enjoy.

Tip: both of these recipes make great boneless chicken fingers too.

For those days when it's just too hot to cook inside, here's a great recipe for the grill - Smouldering Chicken.

The recipe looks like it' going to make something too spicy hot to eat. But trust me, the heat is there, but mild heat it is. And it lingers, like the warm glow of a smouldering camp fire, hence the name. This chicken is a favorite in my family. It too is worth trying.

Smouldering Chicken

If you love Hot Wings*

If you love hot wings, then I have an outstanding barbecue chicken recipe for you. I call it Smoldering Chicken. It doesn’t burn your mouth, but leaves a warm glow.
And the flavor is amazing. Trust me, when you read the ingredients, you will probably think that this chicken is beyond the taste buds of ordinary mortals. It looks like it will be blistering hot. But it isn’t. It will surprise you. (By the way, this is my eldest daughter’s, and husband’s favorite chicken. She begged for the recipe.)

The technique given is for use with a kettle-style charcoal grill, but can easily be adapted to any covered grill or barbecue, gas, wood, or charcoal. Enjoy.

Sauce:
1/3 cup Sriracha brand Hot Sauce
2 tbs. Tabasco Pepper Sauce
1 tbs. good soy sauce

8 to 10 chicken thighs, with the skin removed

Mix the sauce ingredients together. Pour into a 1 gallon freezer bag & add the chicken pieces. Move everything around inside the bag until the chicken is well coated with the sauce. Press the air from the bag and place it in the refrigerator for two hours. Make your side dishes during this marinating time.

Fire up the grill with a solid bed of charcoal and let it go until the coals are glowing. Place the chicken on the grill, leaving space between the pieces. Cover and close all vents half way. Cook for 7 minutes. Remove the lid and turn over. Cover and cook for 7 additional minutes. Test with an instant read meat thermometer. Remove the chicken when the internal meat temperature reads 160 degrees.

Serve with chilled, ripe cantaloupe, and a nice three-bean salad.


Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2015, 03:19 PM   #38
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
So many fried chicken recipes call for a 3.5LB-4.0Lb chicken. I haven't seen a chicken that small in many years.
We have a store close by that sells small chickens. Under or about three pounds. They also sell larger ones for a little less money per pound. We buy the small ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
OK...my first attempt at pan frying chicken didn't come out as well as I thought it would. I had the oil at about 340F and placed the Dixie Fry coated wing and leg in the oil. I let it roil boil for 5 minutes on one side, but upon turning it over, it was already dark and burnt on that side. I think 5 minutes on that one side was too long. Anyways, I flipped the pieces over and let it fry for only 2 or 3 minutes to avoid burning it. Then I lowered the temp and let it cook for another 15 minutes. I then set it on a rack and into a 350F oven to let it finish cooking the inside. The meat came out ok, but the coating was hopelessly ruined.

What I'll do next time. I'll keep the oil temp at 350F and let it splatter fry for only 2 minutes max per side, to keep it looking golden brown, not burnt brown. Then I'll move the skillet off the burner for a minute and let the oil cool down, then return it to the burner and cook at a reduced temp for awhile, then place it in a 350F oven to cook the inside and drain out any excess oil. Still learning !!!
My wife and I have been frying chicken on the stove top for over 40 years combined.
First. How much oil are you using? We add about 1 inch or better. So when the chicken is frying, the oil almost covers it. About 1/3rd of the chicken is always submerged.
We do not measure the temp. My wife turns the stove to medium while she seasons and flours the pieces.
She then ads one piece and it should seem very hot. She then adds more pieces, but not to many. Do not overcrowd the pan.
They cook this way covered for 10 minutes. The lid is removed and they are fried until that side is golden brown.
She then turns them over to brown up the other side. The second side goes much faster.
Either your oil is to hot or you are overcrowding the pan and simmering them instead of frying them.
There is no reason to turn more than once.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I never finished my fried chicken in the oven; I did the whole thing on the stovetop. Your oil is too hot. You should be able to brown it more slowly, 10 minutes or so per side, to render out the fat under the skin and cook the meat gently. If you're using a lid, that will increase the temperature inside the pan as well, like taxlady said.
Good advice. Sound advice that should be heeded.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2015, 10:37 PM   #39
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,297
Caslon, you kind of have to get a feel for frying chicken...keep at it, once you get the hang of it, you'll be so glad you did. Nothin' better than nibbling on some cold fried chicken for a couple of days, or taking a bunch of it to a gathering. I love good ol' down home fried chicken and have made it every few months or so for 30 years.

I dust the chicken pieces lightly with seasoned flour, dip in beaten egg, then put them in the flour again and let them set for a while. Maybe 20 minutes or so. Meanwhile, I heat up the skillet and when it's hot, I add an inch or so of oil and let that heat up. I try to add enough oil to come up to about half of the chicken.

I don't use a thermometer - I just sprinkle a pinch of flour in the oil and if it bubbles and sizzles right away, I figure it's time to add the chicken. I don't cover it with a lid, but do use a spatter screen.

Like GG says, if your oil is too hot, you won't get that fat rendered from under the skin. After a few minutes or so, lift up a piece of the chicken and check underneath, it should be starting to brown nicely.

If you use the same skillet, and the same chicken pieces for the next couple of times, you'll get the hang of what works for you. As others have said, there's a bunch of different ways - some cover with a lid, some finish cooking in the oven, but it's all good.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2015, 11:17 PM   #40
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,297
These drumsticks are from a couple of days ago, I fried up 6 of them and still nibblin' on them.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	002.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	47.1 KB
ID:	22811  
__________________

__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chicken, how to

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.