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Old 04-27-2015, 11:24 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
Caslon, you kind of have to get a feel for frying chicken...keep at it, once you get the hang of it, you'll be so glad you did. Nothin' better than nibbling on some cold fried chicken for a couple of days, or taking a bunch of it to a gathering. I love good ol' down home fried chicken and have made it every few months or so for 30 years.

I dust the chicken pieces lightly with seasoned flour, dip in beaten egg, then put them in the flour again and let them set for a while. Maybe 20 minutes or so. Meanwhile, I heat up the skillet and when it's hot, I add an inch or so of oil and let that heat up. I try to add enough oil to come up to about half of the chicken.

I don't use a thermometer - I just sprinkle a pinch of flour in the oil and if it bubbles and sizzles right away, I figure it's time to add the chicken. I don't cover it with a lid, but do use a spatter screen.

Like GG says, if your oil is too hot, you won't get that fat rendered from under the skin. After a few minutes or so, lift up a piece of the chicken and check underneath, it should be starting to brown nicely.

If you use the same skillet, and the same chicken pieces for the next couple of times, you'll get the hang of what works for you. As others have said, there's a bunch of different ways - some cover with a lid, some finish cooking in the oven, but it's all good.
It is hard to say what temp you should be frying your chicken. You just know when it is right. Each stove is different. It is like when my mother taught me to stick my hand in the oven and know when it was ready for the food.
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Old 04-28-2015, 12:03 AM   #42
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Thanks all. I'll lower my oil temps. I still have a bunch of pieces that I soaked in buttermilk and froze.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:27 PM   #43
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So many fried chicken recipes call for a 3.5LB-4.0Lb chicken. I haven't seen a chicken that small in many years.
Interesting, to get Kosher chicken bigger than that I'd have to special order and even then there is no guarantee I would be able to get it.
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Old 04-28-2015, 05:42 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
So many fried chicken recipes call for a 3.5LB-4.0Lb chicken. I haven't seen a chicken that small in many years.
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Interesting, to get Kosher chicken bigger than that I'd have to special order and even then there is no guarantee I would be able to get it.
I find organic chicken in that weight range. Just as well, they cost $11.98/kg (~$5.44/lb).
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Old 04-29-2015, 12:11 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
Thanks all. I'll lower my oil temps. I still have a bunch of pieces that I soaked in buttermilk and froze.
What?
"Soaked in buttermilk and froze" Why would you freeze the chicken AFTER you had it in buttermilk? I don't know why, but for some reason that just sounds atrocious.

Lets start with the buttermilk.
I have made it with and without buttermilk and prefer the "without".
For some reason chicken that has been soaked in buttermilk browns way to fast for my liking and I now will never use buttermilk again.
Just chicken, seasoning and flour.
No overnight marinades or special rubs or seasonings. Salt and pepper only.

Freezing buttermilk soaked chicken would be way out of my realm of experience. But I am certain its not a good idea and personally I would not do it.

Are you using a heavy bottom skillet?
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Old 05-01-2015, 04:42 PM   #46
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We fry chicken in an electric frying pan - I've been using the same one for about 20 years. The sides are a bit deeper than a standard frying pan and it keeps a nice constant temp. Use enough oil to submerse chicken a little over half way, Don't crowd the pan but also try to have it full enough so you don't need so much oil.

I also recommend cutting up a whole chicken - the precut parts almost always have added saltwater and the result is soggier chicken.

For coating you could keep it simple and use seasoned flour or you could go all out and use a dry - wet - dry process. For extra thick and crunchy coating. Seasoned flour, eggwash and then a final dredge in flour or breadcrumbs.

Experimenting will be fun :)
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Old 05-02-2015, 04:02 AM   #47
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I finally figured out not to try and make extra crispy chicken. Also, I made the simplest of a flour mix consisting of salt and pepper and a smattering of other spices. I lowered the level of oil in my pan to almost less than half way up the sides of the chicken pieces. I didn't even use a thermometer but waited until the oil in the pan started to shimmer. Then I put plain floured chicken pieces into the oil and let it slow oil boil, and I flipped it a few times. The chicken came out great.
Maybe not super coated like KFC, but at least the pieces didn't come out burnt brown. I learned a lot.

I bought one of those tubs of mashed potatoes and some chicken gravy (just to get that authentic KFC wallpaper paste taste experience), some coleslaw too. The only thing missing was the biscuits and honey. That's next on my list to learn...biscuits.
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Old 05-02-2015, 05:03 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Caslon View Post
I finally figured out not to try and make extra crispy chicken. Also, I made the simplest of a flour mix consisting of salt and pepper and a smattering of other spices. I lowered the level of oil in my pan to almost less than half way up the sides of the chicken pieces. I didn't even use a thermometer but waited until the oil in the pan started to shimmer. Then I put plain floured chicken pieces into the oil and let it slow oil boil, and I flipped it a few times. The chicken came out great.
Maybe not super coated like KFC, but at least the pieces didn't come out burnt brown. I learned a lot.

I bought one of those tubs of mashed potatoes and some chicken gravy (just to get that authentic KFC wallpaper paste taste experience), some coleslaw too. The only thing missing was the biscuits and honey. That's next on my list to learn...biscuits.
Caslon, it sounds like you are on a trip of a true foodie. I am sure you will get a lot of help with the biscuits also. For the honey, you will have to talk to the bees. Good luck on your next food adventure.
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